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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 048
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 048. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 048. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1097

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 048, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 048
Transcript and control. Without proper discipline children would lose respect for those in positions of authority; and a generation of lawless individuals, without respect for law and order, could result. A new interpretation of learning flourished. Anyone acquainted with the dictionary meaning of the word was baffled. Drill and repetition were considered to be meaningless in the learning experience because learning could not be imposed on the child from without. He had to accept learning. Therefore, it was necessary to employ new methods. Group discussion technique was introduced; it was even recommended that the group discussion technique replace the pro and con of debate. The majority vote was to be abandoned in favor of the consensus, a single opinion supposedly representing the group opinion. When a meeting was deadlocked, it was not possible to vote. The deadlock had to be broken by some members' giving up their views — in a word, compromise. JVIany felt that the American way of life was threatened by the group discussion with its accompanying consensus wherein the majority vote was abandoned. The majority vote guaranteed to each individual the right to express his opinion on a final decision through the secret ballot, whereas the consensus did not. It seemed that the consensus, or collective opinion, was not necessarily the result of majority thinking. Therefore, the group discussion technique as advocated in Pasadena appeared to be a serious threat to the representative form of government. Pasadena had long been aware of the need for an intercultural program and had taken steps to meet this need. A human relations committee had been functioning for several years before the arrival of Mr. Goslin; its primary goal had been to create better understanding among those of different races and culture. Under Mr. Goslin this committee was sidetracked; the primary aim of human relations became that of creating awareness of race and class, and discrimination against minorities. Understanding was of secondary importance. Racial awareness and feeling were created where none existed before. Sex was to be taught at all levels of the school in mixed classes (boys and girls). Sex pictures were to be shown to children according to their ages. Books supplementing the pictures were to be introduced to high school children. The teaching of sex by the schools is a highly controversial subject. If Willard Goslin had brought his own dictionary to Pasadena he would have spared the people considerable confusion. Leadership, the dictionary states, means the ability to lead; or, the guidance of a leader. Under Mr. Goslin, leadership was defined as the function of the group. The teacher was to recognize that all children were leaders. In practice it meant that the best students and the natural leaders were repressed. Since no one received recognition for ability or application, there was little encouragement to excel or to reach a position warranting leadership. Iv spite of the fact that we are a highly competitive society Mr. Goslin did not believe in teaching competition to children. He said it was a great way to sell bananas but a poor way to raise children. Competition was frowned upon because children of lesser ability could not compete and would feel like failures. Grades were competitive, Page 46 hence other methods of evaluating the child's progress were recommended. Grades made children feel inferior- All children were to be promoted whether they failed or passed, because a child's confidence and personality wouM lie injured if he had to repeat a class. Such views were not acceptable. Without lessons U> competition, children would not be adjusted to fit out society which is highly competitive. With no grades, there would be no measuring rods for achievement. If good and poor work received equal recognition the incentive to excel would be destroyed. With no failures for incomplete an1' below-passing work, children would go from grade '" grade without adequate foundation. Some citizens in Pasadena who were informed concerning education in totalitarian countries stated that the aim of those countries wa5 to eliminate competition in all forms from the mind of tl"e student so that he would be incapable of earning a living and would lean on the state for support. Teacher-parent relations became verv- strained nudC the Goslin administration. This was due in part to th6 basic changes that the teachers had to incorporate int0 the curriculum in the classrooms and in part to the extrcii" emphasis on psychology. Parents resented the intrusio0 into their home life. JVIost revolutionary was the "philosophy of change" thi" Willard Goslin brought to Pasadena. Those participate in a group were persons trained to effect change, who we"* to be action-minded so as to carry change into actio"1' Change — for what? By whom? Where were the inn(,v:1 tions leading? Those who had the temerity to qticsti"' the changes were informed that the educators were h^ qualified to determine the needs of education. By creating an aura of superiority around the Goffl program and by ridiculing the tried and tested vie«* many changes that made no sense whatever were intf duced and accepted. Change — for what? By whom? "'! modern education? For the new social order? For sod'1 ism? For communism? For chaos? For greater indepo" ence, or for slavery? Change is a means to an end. "'' is it an end in itself? Too many changes too fast create uneasiness and "r trust. Willard Goslin moved too last. Almost iniinedia11' after assuming office he began to reorganize the sllP\J visory staff at the central office, flis actions seemed follow the pattern of gathering greater control. He *J not the blustering type. He made friends who became^ followers, and he gradually wooed them away from " established order to his dreams of modern education- , Imported to Pasadena by Mr. Goslin was Dr. Hoi"'1* I Gilchrist, in the summer of 1949, to fill the important Pj| tion of assistant superintendent in charge of instructi" Unfortunately for those who desire a more conserVSJ] form of education, Mr. Gilchrist is still iii Pasadena, sp^jj soring the same program of education as that atlvoc:'" by Willard Goslin. Oltside speakers were employed to speed the pro.-1'1 ,, Dr. William Heard Kilpatrick, one of the original BwJ bers of the Progressive Education Association and I1' ... ently connected with the American Education FellowtfJ Dr. Theodore Brtuneld, known for his pro-Marxist v <v, Erika Mann; Owen Lattimore; Michael Fielding!, ^ Hubert Herring; Dr. William Jack Stone; Dr. Robert Bj One fact was clear — Willard Goslin's main sup? Facts Fi April,
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