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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 047
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 047. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1096.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 047. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1096

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 047, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1096.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 047
Transcript nave disappeared and there is no ready reference or written evidence of any program. Much material apparently Was lost when the libraries of the elementary curriculum, secondary curriculum, and personnel offices were coordinated into a central filing system under Superintendent Goslin. Evidence of change in the school program is Scattered all over Pasadena — in newspaper files, in private scrapbooks, in pamphlets, and in stacks of records at the office of the Board of Education. After gathering information concerning the Goslin 'urninistration, the researcher is confronted with a more baffling; task. The source material is not easy to read. It is infusing. To the layman, there appears to be something new tind vague about the philosophy of education. It is difficult to identify. Familiar philosophy is used to indoctrinate the reader with unfamiliar philosophy. Take, for Sample, these parallels: FAMILIAR IDEAS t W'- should conserve and pro- ^'t our natural resources. (Children should not be made 1 feel inferior. ft(. i s""i'"-iry: Words such as <;(i"iu. liberty, peace, conser- l,;''1""- love of man for his """■i. democracy: UNFAMILIAR IDEAS The conservation of natural resources necessitates public ownership ami communal enterprises. There should he no grades, no failures, no curriculum restrictions, and no competition, because "competition is the poorest base on which to try to develop (lie little citizens ol a dee country." Were re-interpreted in terms of a new and questionable concept of democracy. 011 years in America, the schools have been the center BlUch community activity; however, this activity has tally been confined to education, social gatherings, lec- jes- and occasional local meetings. In this capacity the "'"Is have served the community well. the Goslin administration advocated a school-centered "Irnunity in which the school was elevated to a position extreme importance. The school was to be the living j e "I the community, the center around which all activ- ' revolved. With the school as the leader, the community i as h> participate in solving problems of labor, business, ">l|Si.,.. .—If .-Jr-i . -in ■ -. l.l:.. ..i:l::•..-.... "ls!'itals. , ''<■ pressure for a school-centered community created ^ ''-'Min-ss in Pasadena. Although few were acquainted th "'e P'an for such tt school, many were aware that Schools were expanding into more and more of the Og, welfare, medicine, public services, public utilities, •Ovation, food, race and class problems, and even %>, "Uinitv life and into the home as well n. 11 order to organize a school-centered community it to use groups. Groups were the "pilot •is ' through which the activities of the people were lei nie, the group idea was to be enlarged into interna- At ' lh tn"(''<'(l. The group was important first, last, and always. ti ">1al I,"'"" ^ h, "sm. It vvtis believed that there should be the "devel- "t of an ever-widening group consciousness until 'niian race is the group." Excessive emphasis on the !,,.' ''"'tance of the group at the expense of the individual v-i, '(' People wonder if this interpretation of group •it, niacy had a collective significance. They were not where it was leading. s,.i " order to speed up the program, study groups of "'i personnel were organized to discuss the Pasadena schools. Later these study groups, or workshops, extended to the lay people in the city who met to discuss civic and world problems, conservation, UNESCO and world understanding, and human relations. The method used for conducting these meetings was group dynamics. Although The Pasadena Story maintained that there were no curriculum changes under Willard Goslin, there were many. The 100 per cent experience curriculum was introduced by Dr. William Heard Kilpatrick. The curriculum was to be broadened on the base of experience. Fixed courses of study were to be reduced. The teacher was freed from curricular requirements in the lower grades. Courses of study were introduced as experience necessitated. The first job of education was defined as personality and character development. The teacher was deprived of guides and a set curriculum which had already been tried and tested. In the upper grades the 100 per cent core curriculum was expanded to include subjects such as citizenship, home and family living, philosophy of life, personality problems, the spirit of science, and human relations or race and class consciousness. One bulletin carried the amazing description: "The curriculum is within the child." Both teachers and parents were confused with the 100 per cent experience curriculum, which removed yardsticks for measuring achievement. The experience curriculum threatened to water down courses of study with vague substitutions which could not be graded. People began to wonder if children could receive an education under the new curriculum. It was further recommended that college requirements be abolished. Colleges were to be open to everybody regardless of qualifications. Scholarship societies should be abolished. These recommendations made many feel that the whole structure of education was being broken down. XJsk of the suggestions that met stonewall resistance was concerned with setting up school camps. A committee met for the purpose of setting up a school camp for sixth grade children far away from home and parents. Distance from home influence was essential. Children in school camps would learn "group-cohesive" living. The individual would learn to accept his place within the group. The group would rule and the individual would be subordinated to the group at all times. Discipline, rewards, punishments, and routine duties would be imposed not bv the teachers and counselors, but by the group. Socialism was to be lived in the mountains, away from home influence. Hoy Scout, VMCA, and other independent summer camps would be replaced by school-ruled camps. Parents and citizens in Pasadena feared these camps in which children ruled themselves and decided upon their own discipline. In Japan as in Germany, school camps started innocently as week-end sojourns and ended as harsh training camps. The camps were used to indoctrinate youth in totalitarian doctrines and to alienate children from their parents. In group self-discipline children vv ere not to be restricted with rules, except those which they agreed upon. Students were to decide upon the course of study, and were not to be committed to the teacher's choice. The feeling was widespread that group self-discipline, as advocated in Pasadena, threatened teacher authority V t fs ing t - I, \i us. April, 1956 Page 45
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