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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 046
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 046. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1095.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 046. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1095

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 046, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1095.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 046
Transcript 1 he primary aim of the Communists is to change society. The primary aim of the social planners is to change society. Obviously, the danger of progressive education lies in its proximity to socialistic and communistic theories. Dr. Bella V. Dodd, as an ex-Communist, told the United States Senate Subcommittee on Internal Security in 1952: "The Communist party as a whole adopted a line of being for progressive education." She said that progressive education was "eagerly seized upon and championed by the Comintern as being the ideal system for limiting the ability of children in capitalistic societies to.read, write, and think or act for themselves, and so to cause them to depend upon the state for a guaranteed livelihood and for protection against the hazards caused by their inadequate training for the battle of life." John Morley, foreign correspondent, wrote: "I came out of the Iron Curtain (secretly) in a wagon last year, with two University of Prague professors. Both had been educators and statesmen under Eduard Benes and Jan Masaryk. Their conclusion as to the real reason back of the 'Red Victory' behind the Iron Curtain was that it was due, for the most part, to Communist infiltration into schools, all schools, from elementary to college level." Concerning infiltration of the schools, he says: "I heard it from Protestant Winston Churchill, from Hindu Nehru, and directly from the lips of Pope Pius XII, that infiltration into schools is the modern method of most effectively spreading the cancer of communism. Igor Gouzenko, who confessed to Russian espionage in Canada and in the U. S. a few years ago, told that Zarubin's Number One target was the schools in Canada, the U. S. A., and Mexico. Zarubin is Russia's Ambassador in Washington.'' In 1948 the planners of the new or modern, alias progressive, education, launched a full-scale invasion of the schools in Pasadena under the leadership of Willard E. Goslin. There seems little doubt that Pasadena was the testing ground for the nation. Therefore, it behooves those in other communities to know what really happened in this conservative city. Ihe average reader has had little or no opportunity to get facts about the story. From coast to coast a distorted version of what happened in Pasadena has been circulated. Practically all the material written concerning the Pasadena controversy has indicated strongly that the people who opposed Willard Goslin's modern education were undermining the public schools and were thereby traitors to America. What were these people defending? What were they opposing? The people of Pasadena were defending the American way of life as provided in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. As parents, under the Constitution they exercised their right to state the kind of education they wanted for their children. Since thev felt that the traditional form of education provided greater literacy, more inquisitive minds in their children, and better discipline, parents sought to protect this form of education against annihilation. They urged the teaching of competition, American history, and the basic fundamentals. They defended the free enterprise, capitalistic system. When they stiw the axe swing at their concept of democracv, saw the blows strike the individual, and learned that they had to be re-educated in their concept of democracy, they rebelled. Loose interpretation of the Page 44 Constitution, the use of textbooks (such as the "Building America Series") which had been declared unfit for California schools, the hiring of radical left wing thinkers to augment the school program, and constant pressure to eliminate the majority vote in favor of the consensus, til contrary to the security of the American way of life frightened the people of Pasadena. It appeared that not only democracy but also the public schools, life blood of democracy, were in danger. Therefore, they protested loudly. When citizens protested, they were ignored. As their voices grew louder, they were criticized. Every conceivable weapon was used to drown the voice of the people- Anyone who opposed the school administration vvtis promptly denounced. Finally, when the people of Pass* dena knew that their voices would not be heard, when they learned that they must accept something they did no' want, they turned to the one defense that the Constitutioi" of the United States provided for them. On June 2, 19,50, the voices of more than 22,000 people were heard. In the secrecy of the election booth they stamped their disapproval, and the Goslin administration vvtis defeated by a vote of two to one. Five months 1 a*1'' Willard E. Goslin was asked to resign. The Pasadena story should have ended with the rest nation of Mr. Goslin. It didn't. The citizens of Pa.sadci>;1 found that instead of being heralded as the standard bear ers for good education, they were being condemned lj attackers of the public schools. Dr. Harold Benjamin ° the National Education Association branded Goslin's opp"' sition as "the enemy." In the summer of 1948, Willard E. Goslin assumed ''" duties of superintendent of the Pasadena schools. He "'* welcomed by many who, if they had taken the time •* examine the contract that the Board of Education sign1' at the request of the superintendent, might have be1' wary. This contract virtually promoted the new super" tendent to a role of supreme power. The board was subordinate itself to the superintendent in the choice ° administrative personnel, outside lecturers, and in all '"'' ters pertaining to the schools. In retrospect it is quite clear that this contract ma' it possible for the superintendent to introduce ideas '"' would otherwise have been rejected. When Willard G° lin first interviewed the board, he asked them if Pasad'"' were ready to become the "cutting edge" in educat"' Undoubtedly, they didn't know what he meant. It is '1'" f certain that he was proposing to them to use the I'asad''1', schools as the testing ground for modern or progreS^ education. According to The Pasadena Story. Mr. Goslin had t'lf , goals: to improve the quality of teaching; to carr) c('"l'„ tion in democratic practices to the community; to defl>cji lati/.e the administration. Although these goals may SOU commendable, they carried all the elements required ' reconstruction of the school system and revision of c'" munity thinking as well. ., Like the planners of the new social order, Willard "1 lin did not wait for the enlightenment of the people b^B introducing his program. Inasmuch as his program c0 J tilted tt major change not only in the schools but in &jft munity life as well, the people should have been C0nsuffl| Anyone seeking to ferret out the story of Willard (,'|| lin's administration would find it exceedingly d'"'1'^ today. He did not leave an easy trail to follow. lvec"r Fachs Fouum Nt April-
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