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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 043
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 043. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1092.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 043. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1092

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 043, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1092.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 043
Transcript INTRODUCTION N othing is of more vital consequence to us, individually and collectively, than the progress and welfare °' our children, who represent the nation's future. That is why American communities support their public Scnools with unselfish zeal, and watch keenly the effects of public-school training upon impressionable youth. '"at is why widespread interest was focused on Pasadena, California, when the "progressive" or "modern" educational system was introduced there, only to be subsequently rejected by that city. Our purpose in selecting this book for condensation is to present the lesser-known side of the story, as told v Mrs. Allen, a housewife and mother who, when these stirring events took place, was among those present. The editorial attitude of FACTS FORUM NEWS toward the Pasadena controversy is one of complete ^tachment and impartiality. Therefore, from numerous older, hence more widely-circulated books on the sub- '6ct/ which champion the opposite side, we refer you to the following books: THE PASADENA STORY Published by the Notional Commission for the Defense of Democracy through Education, NEA, 1951 THIS HAPPENED IN PASADENA By David Hulburd. Published by The Macmillan Company, New York, 1951 Education or Indoctrination A CONDENSATION OmETHING litis happened in our public schools. Businessmen, university professors, ministers, judges, politicians, commentators, doctors, writers, parents, many others have voiced their alarm. Concern over I lc'ntion litis spread from the largest cities to the most !j «ted communities. Our schools, once the proud heritage f '.'" children in America, have become the center of con- 0 .°n> emotional wrangling, and extreme differences ol '"'lint,. It '''tit has happened in our public schools to thrust t) '" 'nto the forefront of a battle of ideas? Not long ago We saine schools were heralded as institutions of Icarn- feft V'1'cn "'fr'"''' to ('v<,ry child the opportunity to 1)(., "' knowledge and improve his status in society. The 'if were satisfied. Today the schools are losing pres- And the people are dissatisfied ertainly the people of America 1 ) jjtgness to support their schools with tax (loll ,,^'itainly of America have demonstrated a """ess to support their schools with tax dollars. At L ""'c in the history of America has so much money ay. sPcnt on the temples of learning. Unquestionably, ,, ' '"' classroom facilities tire necessary; but education largely on the teacher and the learner. It can halt, tt prison cell, or tl eoncen- camp. tr;,. P'ace in a mining "Oct, "1 ">' educators see today the educative process from '-economic point of view Involving relation, inter '""I elaborate tools of instruction, rather than as tt (r)Q,''ess designed to provide each individual with the "' learning which would enable him to reason intelli- Ut, cia "Oil, N- 'oiu vt News, April, 1956 gently, live morally, and strive toward the highest possible goals attainable in our society. This very difference in the meaning of the word education makes it difficult for the lay citizen and the educator to understand each other. In the past, an educated person was considered to be one who had accumulated a storehouse of information and knowledge. The gathering of knowledge through the educative process was not considered a selfish goal or a wtiste to society. It was tt respected goal because an educated man was more likely to abet social progress through invention and wisdom. Social conformance was not so important as social progress, It was no crime to be different from one's fellow man and no disgrace, among one's classmates, to be an honor student. Although the public schools made academic education available lor all. not all were qualified to meet the requirements. Since everyone has some contribution to make to society, the object of education should be to develop each child to the highest degree possible, commensurate with his ability. Therefore, trade, industrial, and business courses, equally as important to our socictv tts academic ones, were introduced. However, in making the changes to meet the needs of the child Otherwise gifted, something happened. If this wen- not so, we would not be hearing from educators, writers, and businessmen that we are turning out illiterates, that children are poorly prepared for life in our competitive socictv-, and that respect for authority, our Page 41 V
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