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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 035
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 035. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1084.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 035. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1084

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 035, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1084.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 035
Transcript t-n« lonth. Nl" tes that al The otl» have aboi more thj readvaJB le seal in editorial content of maga- rtgage pa) - es and newspapers, and in advertis- ")"■ people everywhere will get the *a that " '56 is the year to fix" - and ?ey will be encouraged to improve *e'r homes this year. Operation Home Improvement is "deed a big idea. And it is a well- iment wO<]^Ordinated national effort. But per- *Ps most exci * local level JJPs most exciting is what happens at ■ j? local level when tt whole city gets ociatiortl c ^overniTif1l*!liud OHI and makes a local cam- that Ope^ J""?" out of it. Today, many mayors is a b ye proclaiming "Home Improvement leve a $ ]^{ to mark the beginning of their h one S" ^.campaigns. clarationjc'rus local level application is most ■, this important because it means that deal- edented'1 ^ ' contractors, and lenders are join- level. A? Id •ogcther to encourage more people ,el in 09 improve their homes and to help to the idc" ^ *e it easier for them to buv mate- >ne pull" * and services. j^. he timing for this integrated cam- eal of 0» 8" is perfect. Our economy needs :he great* history ar, this s< ons ortisi « tod „(I ; thousfl lers, and SlUttl nroduct* in cle°rance, urban renewal and public housing are linked this multi-billion-dollar stimulus — the building industry needs this campaign to maintain sound growth — and the American people need the help that this campaign promises in making repair and remodeling work easier to buy. Thus, Operation Home Improvement is private enterprise's answer to President Eisenhower's request that there be established a concerted effort to improve old but still sound dwellings. As Collier's magazine stated on its editorial page . . . "The campaign is based on a valid premise: that pride in one's home and community can be as infectious as slovenliness — and far more rewarding and economical. From any viewpoint — the welfare of the community or the self-interest of the home owner — the program makes sense and deserves vigorous support." provision was tied to renewal of FHA — so that a vote against public housing was a vote against the necessary FHA. All this I saw. Even the President's restrictions on public housing were, and are now, removed. President Eisenhower's program requested thirty-five thousand public housing units yearly, but only, first, in connection with slum clearance and urban renewal; and secondly, that the tenants qualifying would be only those persons displaced through slum clearance. his* ** "b//c Housing - Pro and Con 'Pro- Administration's housing program. Operation Home p,r'0Vernent will center on urban renewal; all facets of this local \f orth of' teal di"\ to? orni however, have a common denominator in the nation's In add* Jfciomy. ' tei'i fqc. erTIQrks of Congressman Bruce Alger (R.-Texas), on a recent vities l,s" '% rum radio program, emphasize the importance of keep- GOOD <livl-' Publ st pi' .i/ii"' I better ns an'1 iding ' rial "",,', .rial ff ie and 8 our '""id, government in its proper confines with free enterprise lrig the motive power. Bruce Alger rv j0'1l*e housing would be completely oil "^' ''s r? e '" a socialistic society, since eOn,"''!M| "t °' t'"'"' l'kin. In our country tin rood nI I's i'tat)'(' in a socialistic societv, since ^conAl&t «f their plan. In ndustO \> ,tentioned citizens who cry <■<■'''* V .°.r'<-'',ns should have decent hous- prices thev can afford," forget j 0°uld say the same lor clothes OiH'i'1'! W transportation and till other ■'"V" ' rve th''J fcb|[icanism of the constitutional Re- line m^ ko^ *°rm of government. If federal 'Hy "^ "II MKlllid [)|l \,y0t f"o<l, clothing K °s - for us all? \\ ng th<'s imp8' \,)n lit should provide housing, nd other no- . We all know the i-lv' We want no part of socialism, lu <lnt opportunity and freedom in- Constitution is sorely strained ;*°»nt for the I lousing Act of '55 sin t'1<" Congress. Does public S "line under the over-extended "'<■ tie general welfare" clause? Forum News, April, 19.56 Is it outright constitutional violation? In earlier congresses since 1949, public housing litis repeatedly been voted down. I was there last term when the public housing was eliminated from the Housing Act by a vote of 217 to 188. 1 was also there three days later when public housing suddenly became the law of the land bv a vote of 187 to 168. This reversal resulted when bags were packed and tickets bought to leave Washington. We were threatened with no adjournment or a special session if we didn't pass it right then. Those who knew that the House conferees improperly gave in to the Senate in compromising their difference, refused to fight further with adjournment imminent. Some had already left. Further, in a rather dishonest legislative maneuver, it seemed to me, the public housing DANGERS OUTLINED The American people are capable of right decisions when they have the facts. This is still a government of, by, and for the people. It's time we re- emphasize the danger of public housing so the march toward socialism in this direction can be halted. Here are several pertinent considerations in the light of our previous experiences in the public housing field. Do you think members of the low- income group — those with the most easily recognized need — get the housing? In Detroit a tenant earning $4,500 yearly can live in public housing, in Wilmington, Delaware, $4,800, and in Dayton, Ohio. $5,800. Is this the low-income group? In Congress a New York representative pleaded for help for the middle-income group. Should everyone have public housing? Further, what bureaucrat is so able as to pick and choose the right tenant? Also, will the tenant refuse a promotion in his job if the offer of increased income means he vvill exceed the maximum qualifying income and lose his housing? Arc we passing laws to kill initiative and incentive without regard for human nature? Surely such is not our intention. Now let's think about the cost to the taxpayer. The cost is fantastic! The $10 thousand unit (the lowest cost) eventuallv costs in the neighborhood of $25 thousand. It would even be cheaper to give the property to the tenant initially. However, the tenant is better off living at government expense so lied probably refuse the gift together with taxes, upkeep, and other ownership expenses. The 2?« per cent interest on the money, plus the 2 per eent fixed annual contribution makes the $10 thousand into $18,600 per unit over the forty years life expectancy. And to this, add these expenses — the federal tax loss on the government bonds of $2,352 per unit: the tax loss to the local community, which must keep up the property including gar- Page 33 V
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