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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 027. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1076.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 027. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1076

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 027, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1076.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 027
Transcript OF! AD INFLUENCE? hut , he nied peri- \ UN-UNESCO* Critics urge concentration of resources on more practical subjects tion* ;tion i-in£ for rt of Mur- than Bel- man, rid a The trgee ,1 be •on Id gov- in- it nited over V. Y.) 7ITH all credit in the world for ' good intentions, the record of NESCO becomes steadily poorer. *o or three recent occasions bring "lescapably to the fore, and raise B grave question, to those who a °ade ago were among its most Jent enthusiasts, whether it is worth ■ay not only tlie huge sums spent Hually on it (the United States be- ! by far the heaviest contributor) | also the energy required to defend 'ESCO's motives against many who 9ck them for the wrong reason. Jause of UNESCO's extensive- ' perhaps far too pretentious, cer- •ly misdirected — tirt program, the 'Wem deserves the attention of *v reader who is a sensitive tax- It as well as a citizen of the world. Tie recent occasions, upon none of fch UNESCO has put anything J? its best foot forward, are: Two different but equally direct ■fries in art (its own art books and d this si Q\ESCO sponsored and run First ; that in< ^national Congress of Plastic Arts, incemen' 1 at Venice in October on which igs can < %1 reports are just beginning to y. They' fe through); and its eighth general It is met lerence, at Montevideo in Decem- lolden P ii,, which far too little comment omics J Peen made in the American press, the pan' help remedy the latter, it is forth' our " be to find so detached and authori- servantsj \, ,U| ()])server as one 0f tne fore- new )U [political weeklies, the more than "'I'fV, P,tury-°'c' Economist, surely de- " , J of partipris on behalf of either l abro Hca or (]](, aruv Here are some tsproteiif ex ts fron1 (ha( y.d]u.lhlc love t" rt: his tat J was encouragjug ro }lear t]iat "rll" ^ESC0'S ci"hth general confer- wl j ' held at Montevideo, common '' Sral • seemed at last to be making ;s ' felt. The conference considcr- '.''",'. Jfeduced the number of projects "''^.(l1'undertaken, and it decided that " ,()]|'"embers of its executive board, ar' t, ]j fto elected as individuals, should "Pj nfl We be responsible to their gov- riizatioA 't'nfs' Tne ,atter ,('lo"n- original- ..'■(,,]) pposed bv Britain some years 1 ' "" .should help to keep UNESCO's of cUI °"' "' ''"' c',OIK'-s an<l to fpei on ml le3 '0|,n('- R'd fuller accounts of the V ladings at Montevideo revive the itual iM "'>fs- The delegates apparently lid, ". • d ,,Hi Ltd fro, all I " ( in the April- n,„ March Issue ol .Art News, nie Congressional Record lor j 1955, by Sen. Price Daniel (D-Tex.). thought they bad done something of note by ordering their officials to 'study means of promoting peaceful cooperation' and by asking the governments they represent :to take all necessary measures to assure freedom of expression and to remove barriers to the free flow of undistorted information between member states.' Among the sponsors of these resolutions were the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia. Dr. Evans described the two resolutions as 'ample proof of the lessening of international tensions.' People who know just how much freedom of expression and free flow of information is encouraged by Communist governments may be pardoned if they see in these resolutions fresh evidence of UNESCO's ability to cut itself adrift from reality and even from honesty of mind. "UNESCO started life eight years ago, with the fixed idea that it must have a finger in almost every conceivable pie. The logic behind this reasoning was obscure; what is clear is that it has proved well-nigh disastrous. With less than ten million dollars to spend each year up to now. the organization has been forced to spread the butter very thinly over the great hunks it has tried to swallow; and the impression has inevitably been created that it is no more than a happy hunting ground for cranks. Culture alone is a vast and amorphous term; in no other field is it so easy to let one thing lead on to another, or to juggle so convincingly with the theoretically desirable and the practically useful. Thus it is that a body whose constitution contains ringing words about preventing war by attaching its roots 'in the minds of men' now finds itself designing a 'mobile museum specially adapted to arid zones,' fostering a 'symposium on bromatology' at Santiago de Chile, and submitting reports reviewing research literature on the 'design of wind machines.' "Dr. Evans, who was appointed Director-General some 18 months ago. has sought to adopt a realistic attitude toward UNESCO's manifold projects. But people acquire vested interests in education, science, and culture just as they do in other fields; and although UNESCO is young in years, it has shown itself old enough to be set in its ways. It will not find it easy to turn a deaf ear to those who urge it to provide the world with colored reproductions of Australian aboriginal art or gramophone records of the folk music of the. Eskimo, Tuareg, and Foula peoples. . . . "To argue in this strain is not to prove oneself a Philistine. It would be in UNESCO's own interest to abandon some of its more esoteric projects and to concentrate its resources on those that offer practical results. Admittedly, at Montevideo, some fears were expressed that emphasis on the practical might lead to neglect of spiritual values: but international organizations tire unsatisfactory vehicles for the propagation of spiritual values, and the sad fact is that UNESCO's misguided efforts in some directions UNESCO'S ANSWER TO TRIBUNAL'S DECISION By JOHN f. McJCNNCn, JR. Assistant Director of U. S. National Commission lor UNESCO tt ITU regard to the damages awarded discharged employees of UNESCO who are American nationals, tlie following are the facts: Following the refusal of these employees to respond to a questionnaire and to appear liefore an appropriate loyalty board, Or. Evans, Director- General of UNESCO, advised them that he had lost confidence in them as employees and discharged them from the Agency. These employees, like all others in the Sceretariat, are employed by eontraet. Thus, the routine of discharge involved eontraet termination and. therefore, eame under the statutes applying to contracts. A group of the employees appealed lo the Tribunal of the International Labor Organisation on the grounds that under the statutes their eontraets bad been illegally terminated because in the process, they allege, Dr. Evans violated the clause in the statute relating to reasonable expectancy. The Tribunal of the International Labor Organization found ihe charges in their favor and awarded damages. At the meeting of the Executive Board of UNESCO in late 1955, the Hoard voted in support of the United Stales position to contest the Tribunal's findings in the International Court of Justice, to be argued this spring. I 1 Forum News, April, 1956 Page 25
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