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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 026. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1075.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 026. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1075

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 026, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1075.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript (Continued) U N ESC O —GOO D O «A D EDITORIAL SPELLS OUT LEGION'S WARNING J. HE Administrative Tribunal of the United Nations ruled . . > that four citizens of the United States who were employed by UNESUO and were fired because they would not affirm or deny that they had been Communists be paid $31,000 damages plus court costs or rein- staled. The ruling stated that irrespective of what the United States Loyalty Board said, or irrespective of what American rules or regulations they broke, there was no reflection on "the high standard required of an international official*" If there is anyone who does not believe the United Nations threatens American sovereignty, or that the organization is often utilized as a defense for communism, he should look into this case. The American government, after checking up on the aforesaid employers, suspected them of membership in the Communist conspiracy. The employee* were questioned by United States officials as to whether or not they were in the camp of the enemy. The} refused to answer, so tin- United Stales demanded they be discharged from the jobs they held with UNESCO and be replaced by loyal Americans. It took considerable time, influence and pressure by Ambassador I^odge anil oilier government officials to bring about the action by UNESCO. The dismissed employees appealed to the United Nations for reinstatement or hack pay and lawyers' fees. Three UN officials, none of them Americans, sat in judgment on the right of the American government to act against citizens deemed disloyal OT serurity risks. The foreign trio told the I idled Stales it had no control over its own citizens, that its regulations uere not valid, and that questionable loyalty to the United States was of no importance. If the United States accepts this decision and puts up the cash to abide by this ruling, it will not only indicate our sovereignty is dead but we can, on foreign demand, be made to indemnify citizens deemed disloyal. It is a humiliating experience. The ruling of the United Nations tribunal vindicates the recent action of The American Legion in refusing to accept a whitewash report for UNESCO and makes the report of the committee headed by Ray Murphy look even more stupid than hitherto. . . . The tribunal consisted of a Belgian, Albert Deveze; a Dutchman, Jonkheer van Rijekevorsel, and a Creek, lasson Stavropolous. The three agreed that if the discharges were upheld a precedent would be set so that UN employees could be dismissed if their national governments objected to them. Thus it is now UN law that the United States has lost all jurisdiction over ils citizens in U.N employ. (Reprinted from The Tablet, One Hanson Place, Brooklyn 17, N. Y.) Cri ft ITH which were most effective were those where the persons engaged in the work were living with the people they were trying to help. To subject oneself to the living conditions of a backward people requires an attitude of humility and dedication to service which is most often found in our great religious institutions. The persons cm- ployed by political government, on the other hand, are motivated more by the wages thev- will receive and the conditions under which they will live, the promotions they may expect, and so forth. And this is not meant to be critical of them, because government service in relation to employment in private enterprise requires a certain amount of dedication. However, security plays a great role in choosing government service as a career. The result has been, as might be expected, those who have been administering the UNESCO and Point 4 programs do not usually live with the people whom they are trying to help. I want to point out there are many splendid exceptions to this generality, but these exceptions would work well under a missionary program. Missionary programs are not all attached to churches; some educational missions have been set up by educational insti- tions, many health missions by private individuals. Furthermore, the government programs conducted by these people are almost without exception the least costly and the most effective programs toward gaining real friends Page 24 abroad. I will never forget the time I inadvertently came across an item in the foreign-aid budget for 100 air-conditioning units to be sent to a spot in India. Certainly it was hot in that section of India, but I wondered just how these Point 4 persons were going to work with the people of India in ail-conditioned offices. No; they were not for hospitals. In 19.54 I successfully sponsored an amendment to our tax code which gave an additional 10 per cent deduction for donations to medical, educational, and religious institutions. I did not have in mind our domestic institutions, although I was happy to know thev would benefit also. I had in mind a little discussion I had with a Congregational minister after 1 had spoken before tt symposium held at his church along the lines of this present talk. He said to me: "This is all well, but the problem is so vast that some source like the Federal Treasury is necessary in order to meet the need." Well, it is true that the problem is great, but I do not think money will solve it. Money will help if channeled into the proper places. This tax credit, as far as I am concerned, was to help a little in getting money channeled into our private missions so we could get Friends abroad. Essentially the problems of our would-be friends abroad will never lie solved until thev take from the limited success experienced in our society the .good i NESCO 1 *o or thrt Joescapab ! grave q Cade ago Jent enthu % not oi "ually on > by far t 'also thee 'ESCO's n »ck them Jause of 1 Perhaps "y misdiri *>lem des ty reader £r as well [he recent ith qne< J 'ts best (liffere; Jvities in ar things that have produced this SJlJNESCO cess, and eschew the things that in" Jnational I society still block our advancement i a( Venic greater success. These things can i1 :ii(| report, ther be sold nor given away. They' le through be taken freely, however. It is 1111'' erence at a philosophy of life — the Golden P on which applied to modern economics < ho,.,, mad< proper attention paid to the pan' Lj- of the three servants. If only our i it(, m o , sionaries and government servants e , | gaged in work abroad knew j"/ I political ' little more about the economics 01 inturv 1 I American society, they would be] nr - ' (. intent on selling socialism abroad r- ' 'P1 the belief that because of its profei „.Ld 01" ™' love of the people it did love tl* I excerPt: Which son did the will of his fatlKJ ' the one who said: "I go, sir," and '■ffpopn?0 not-or the one who said: "I will '4' ,'■". .° s but went? Do men gather grapfl ! a *} thorns, or figs of thistles? r (V'V. The Very Reverend Francis r , ' \"e, Savre, Jr., dean of the Washing^uced tl Cathedral, states that I'NF.Sd „',""'Tt'lk< inferior to church missionary wofl Lm,rs ° promoting world friendship. ReM P° etected how he once attended a conforciiC , ""' '"' "" the United Nations organization ^ts- The I said he came awav with a "poig"1 (iPos.ecl ") sense of futility, ' hou,t) "<'' "All those ambassadors of cufl °"t of the those emissaries of art and leafl J°jmd. But and national handicraft . . . j ^d'nRs at I ablaze For the cause of mutual u" °ubts. The standing and peace," he said, "■ - the drawstring that could ArSf L . . together was Licking, and all I N i •,, „>;.""f. at the last was aimless talk." 1955, by Se Facts Forum News, April, VOHl VI \
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