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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 013
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 013. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1062.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 013. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1062

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 013, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1062.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript What do you know about the specialized agency of the United Nations known as UNESCO? Some think it is doing a great job. Others think some changes need to be made. Still others radically disagree with the whole idea. Here and on the following pages are some statements representative of various points of view. V (Fol owing are excerpts from ih< booklet, ™Momu and Answers about UNESCO, ''."''"-lied bv the II. S. National Commia- *'a« for I NESCO, Department of State, Washington 25, D. C.) •Vh, ot Is UNESCO? Set Ihe United Nations Educational ^"'ntific and Cultural Organization ■ "lie of ten specialized international '^'"ties affiliated with the United ,/"'ons. Its purpose, stated in its '""stitution, is: : • ■ tn contribute to peace and secu- .1-v by promoting collaboration among .'"' nations through education, science '"<' culture in order to further universal ^'HX'1'1 for justice, for the rule of law jr™ tor the human rights and lunda- jj'l't-il freedoms which are affirmed for j?8 Peoples "I the world, without dis- ..'"'''"ii ol race, sex, language or reli- peoples nl the world, « ithoul dis- ■ juon of race, sex, language or reli- v"". by the Charter ol the United fe^/Article I, Constitution of 0* Did UNESCO Get Started? /\|i."'' of the problems lacing the \v '''<' leaders (lining World War II and restoring the educational On. cultura] heritage of war-torn Cntri &?*« 'l'" destroyed and libraries had More important. Hl(r" generations of minds had been be jP?1' —with what then seemed to „ r,f!htening efficiency. L ?«'sinen, educators, cultural lead- 'kit" '"any countries were convinced Kg., '"' international organization \r he set up to pool Allied rc- iii., t?8 '111(1 skills for the job of mend- It, the K>ote Vli "ig. havoc of the war and to better international uiidcr- V's ,;5 representatives of 43 coun- VH' '"eluding the United Stales. ^(j "l> a constitution for this organi- "• Delegates from the United States played a substantial role in dialling the document and espociallv in widening the concept of the organization to a broad pcople-to-people type of collaboration. Why Was the United States So Interested? Leaders in both the executive branch and in the (.'(ingress, and private organizations as well, saw this organization as a necessary part of the foundations for lasting peace. To the private organizations, at least, it was no new idea. Since the founding of this country private citizens have taken pail in international cooperation in intellectual and cultural fields. Such organizations as the Internationa] Union of Peace Associations in the International Cooperative Alliance had been formed before World War I. During the interwar period such groups as the International Council of Scientific Unions, the International Union ol Academies, the International Federation of University Women, and Rotary International had affiliate organizations in this country. And, although the U. S. government did not participate in the League of Nations International Institute of Intellectual Cooperation, a National Com- mittee of International Intellectual Cooperation had been set up in this country. Thus, these and many others, including religious and philanthropic groups whose work had long ago taken them into international educational and cultural matters, gave their support to the proposed organization. Accordingly, resolutions were introduced in the House of Representatives "urging" the 1 . S. gov (ailment to participate in the creation of a permanent international organization for educational and cultural cooperation In Representative (now Senator) Karl Mundt of South Dakota, and in the Senate by Senators William Fulbright of Arkansas and Robert Taft of Ohio. They passed with overwhelming majorities. Later our participation in UNESCO was ratified by a vote of 264 to -11 in the House and without dissent in the Senate. Who Belongs to UNESCO? There are now 74 member states. They are as follows: Afghanistan Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Bolivia Brazil Burma Byelorussian S.S.R. (lambodia (lanada Ceylon Chile ('hina < Colombia Costa Rica Cuba (Izechoslovaloa Denmark Dominican Republic Ecuador Eg) ju- KI Salvador Ethiopia France Germany, Federal Republic "I Greece Guatemala Haiti Honduras Hungary India Indonesia Iran Iraq Israel Italy •IS F, "Hi vi \, ws. .\pril, 1956 Japan [ordan Korea, Republic of Laos Lebanon Liberia Libya Luxembourg Mexico Monaco Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Norway Pakistan Panama Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Saudi Arabia Spain Sweden Switzerland Syria Thailand Turkey I Iranian S.S.R. Union of South A Erica I'. S.S.R. I nited Kingdom United Stales Uruguay Venezuela Viet-Nam Yugoslavia Page 11 fs
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