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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 011
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 011. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 22, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1060.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 011. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1060

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 011, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 22, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1060.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript O H the farm problem iv-incotl tost froU ;ith the! progrtj i, EduO ould pr» particul v. techi •tl tow* i the I ing are' desiral tllirntS in base ichniqul produ| dance I ined rrj irocessi am Eis^ n while share « il prioSj eases i" d distrf tin I'''1' of A tanners which cannot be found elsewhere. This would be 'fue particularly for young farmers, or for those who have started farming recently. In the words of Eisenhower, the Administration is determined to see to it that an ''"equate supply of credit remains readily available to our •armers at all times." It is a matter of record that the poor lot of many ■"Tilers has forced them off farms and into cities. Birth |*'es balanced against death rates in cities have never een high enough to justify the phenomenal growth in Ver-all population during the past lew years. Such growth "as come largely from farms. Some of the older fanners who made money during the Postwar '40's have been able to ride out the stormy recent ^ears. The young fanners who started from scratch and no are without reserves, have been harder hit. Harder hit continued The Soil Bank Plan ils. ress i on le il j^0 are the middle-size farmers who have too much farm ttuuce it possible for them to work part-time in town, as ariy others have done and tire doing, and yet are without ''Ugh hind to allow them big-operation efficiencies. The i^u result of all this is that, even though the total niiin- .r °f farms has decreased, the decrease is in the middle- farms. Large farms and small ones are actually taking in numbers. e Gasoline Tax, as point No. 9, would make farmers i '"l>t from paving federal lax on gasoline which is to (1 in farm equipment and machinery. Approximately f^-half ;'ri„ ol the gasoline used by them is utilized on the Administration feels that the farmer me relief in this respect. • and the """"tl to so,,,, ,. Us arnieis are tt kind of buffer group, standing between '"al higher living costs. It seems, then, to be the con- lr) . "s ol till the John Q. Taxpayers that it is time to stop \ ' °8 the farmer often a bridesmaid but never a bride F*** Specifically, that it is time to help the farmer gain a equitable share of the nation's prosperity. 'cq, e is no EASY way to unload the government's |)r() '"illations of farm products and bring about a greater sign | 't>' for the farmer. The nine-point plan was de- to |° bring production in line with consumption, anil by, '"to practical operation the philosophy expressed ' : "■ Eisenhower that: th. fnr0Der role ol gover cut ... is that of partner with Jill 'ir'"<,r ~ never his master. By every possible means we develop and promote that partnership — to the end that for tu ii'nv- continue to he a sound, enduring foundation v"M>i <j itior£ le s to tog experien H 8 should talk with those with whom we disafirve s ' ' *here*& always a chance, rather remote, that /,,,." sl><irks might come tit light « candle which would t* us an, — sir Anthony Eden *u t°vernntent for the people must depend /or its "'it'l' * "" ''"' "''''"'A'''"''''- ''"' morality* the justice, "*e interest of the people themselves. — Groveb Cleveland ft tt,, "taction of free thought and free speech is the 4lt yangrrous of all subversions. It is the one mii- r"nn act that could most easily defeat us, "~ Supreme Coi rt JUSTICE William O. Douglas SF, '-""m News, April, 1956 ELEMENTS OF SIMILARITY He pointed out the present soil bank proposal and the 1933 plan are similar in that fanners would be paid for taking land out of production in surplus crops, and the government would make soil conservation payments for soil-building practices. Another point of similarity is that the new plan, like the old one, would provide the option of the farmer taking surplus crops from the government in lieu of cash payments. PROVED SPECULATIVE "Farmers taking surplus cotton for payment was tried in the early 1930's," said Dr. Benedict. "The record shows that some tanners made money by a rise in price after thev took payment in crops. Presumably the architects of the new legislation would provide suitable curbs for speculative use ol surplus crops." The economist pointed out three areas of dissimilarity, saving: "The new proposal is unlike the old program in that it provides for agreements between the government and the growers for periods of five to ten years, whereas the earlier <le.il mostly was on a year-to-year contractual basis. "Also under the new proposal lands diverted from sin- plus crops could not be used in the production of other crops which would create new surpluses elsewhere. TREASURY PAYMENTS "Another change is that under the system of the thirties the money for benefit payments to growers was derived from a processing tax whereas the new plan would make the payments directly out of the federal treasury." Dr. Benedict termed the soil bank plan of the thirties as not entirely successful although being of some help in reducing acreage anil surpluses in wheat, corn, tobacco and cotton. The greatest factor in leveling off the situation was the droughts of 1933 and 1934 which wiped out the formidable wheat and cotton surpluses of the 1931-32 period, and had the United States on a wheat importing basis by the end of 1934. LEGAL BARRIER? The legal late of the 1933 soil bank plan poses a question in the consideration of a revival of the idea. "After operating for three years," points out Dr. Benedict, "the Supreme Court in 1936 declared the crop adjustment plan unconstitutional on the grounds the government could not tax the processors and could not enter into contracts with individual farmers in connection with the land rental feature. "The present soil bank proposal has individual contractual provisions similar to the contracts ruled unconstitutional in 1936. Possibly, however, the trainers of the new legislation can keep it within the bounds of the 1936 decision, or hope for a more favorable interpretation in tin light of present-day conditions." end Page 9 is ing
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