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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 006
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 006. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1055.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 006. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1055

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 006, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1055.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript DOWN TO EARTH ON continued Nine-Point Farm Plan from 75 to 90 per cent of parity on com, wheat, cotton, rice and peanuts. However, the Act has not had a chance to be effective; it is over-burdened with surpluses already on hand. Government granaries are bulging, and these stockpiles cannot be kept forever. There are only two disposition routes open — discounting the fact that they could be destroyed, which would, most agree, be an asinine thing to do — these stockpiles of food must be used either in this country or disposed of abroad. If used in this country, these surpluses would compete with crops which farmers are currently selling. Moreover, if the surpluses were moved abroad in large amounts, they would, in the words of Mr. Eisenhower, ". . . shatter world prices and trade, injure our friends and undermine domestic prices as well." It is possible, of course, to dispose of some of the surplus, both abroad and at home. However, these available outlets would be of such a minute nature as to absorb little of the mountainous surplus. Surpluses, whether the taxpayer knows it or not, are costing us one million dollars daily in storage charges. And, when the government starts tapping John Q. Taxpayer on the hip. it hits J. Q. T. in the vital area where he lives. It is claimed that under Eisenhower's plan there would be no need for large appropriations of money to finance the agricultural program, because it would pay its own way. And, as a matter of record, both Eisenhower and Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson want the plan to be on a voluntary basis. Indeed. Mr. Benson, in a speech before the Vegetable Growers Association, December 8, 1955. Sheraton Park Hotel, Washington, D. C, made the following statement: There are now a lew people in this country who apparently think it is smart politics to capitalize on agriculture's troubles. These are the same people who previously shackled fanners with price controls and regimentation — and who tried to ram down the throat of agriculture a Brannan Plan that would have made farmers' income depend on government checks. They are now popping up all over the place with quack remedies and discarded nostrums. . . . We cannot accept economic aspirin tablets that do not get at the roots of our agricultural ills. We must build soundly — with programs that assist fanners to meet the problems of today and also to face the future with confidence. Secretary Benson, in the same speech, made reference to the six-point farm program which he and President Eisenhower had announced in Denver a few weeks earlier. This program had as its goal the helping of farmers to gain a fairer share of the nation's prosperity. The six points mentioned were as follows: 1. A stepped-up program of surplus disposal and expansion of exports. •2. A vigorous purchase program to remove market gluts, wherever they occur, and to assist fanners to adjust to market demands. 3. An enlarged program of soil conservation and incentive payments to divert cropland into grass and trees, particularly in drought areas. I. Expansion of the Rural Development Program for low- income farm families. 5. \ stepped-up program of research, emphasizing lower costs of production, new uses for farm products, new crops, and expansion of markets. Page 4 6. A speed-up of the Great Plains Program in cooperation with the ten states involved. This is a program directed toward better land use and better farming practices in tlie dry-land of the West where drought and soil-blowing are a constant threat. The above-mentioned six points were explained more fully and augmented with three more points by Eisenhower in his message to Congress. Briefly, in outline form, Eisenhower's Nine-Point Program is as follows: 1. The Soil Hank A. Acreage-Reserve Program B. Conservation-Reserve Program 2. Surplus Disposal 3. Strengthening Commodity Programs 4. Dollar limit on price supports 5. Rural development program 6. The Great-Plains Program 7. Research 8. Credit 9. Gasoline Tax. As point No. 1, the Soil Bank plan lias as its purpose the working-oil of surpluses in order to gear production to possible markets. According to Eisenhower, an intelligent attack is needed as follows: first, future production of crops in greatest surplus must be adjusted both to the accumulated stocks and to the potential markets. Second, producers of other crops and of livestock must be relieved of excessive production from acreage diverted from surplus crops. Third, lands poorly suited to tillage, now producing un- needed crops and subject to excessive wind and water erosion, must be retired from cultivation, (Continued on Page 6) -Should Secretary o MT NO f Agricol'J n of Senator '"j . .l- _l .ten . .. was the reaction M. Dirksen (R-lll.) to the above q"e£ on a recent Facts Forum radio p'°9 contir tliat , today As am] I- the (. 'Ill' CI exceec of the It Was r fired 1 began Th raised misunc contaii to Ii,. hilling raised soil ba Thi: r<?main Ported 8 niatb ties in [o li,.a, farmers ''"son ** V A a OKDrNG to Senator Dirksen. it seems to be the fa L political sport these days to pan Ezra Benson, '''j It is not surp^ V'-. made the following statement that there are some who shout for Benson's blood what I can see and make out of this whole ease, tb»J reason I know they can assign for wanting to get Secretary Benson is that he has resolutely refused "' j, sue a course which he believes to be unsound, ° y refused to follow a program that he deems to be " for the country as a whole. ". . . It takes consummate moral courage of * i like Ezra Benson to wrestle with the farm prol>l<'"'\ 1 _..! -• ;J » 11 . . 1 ■ 1. 1. .1-1 ...,t e we have now. and which tin: mil incidentally, which he did il"1 administration inherited. And it takcsj( moral courage to wrestle with them and not keep ;l constantly on the ballot box. . ." Since Benson became Secretary of Agriculture traveled over a quarter of a million miles to atti'i"'. ings and to confer with people everywhere. DirkseH] eluding remark was as follows, ". . . America and | can agriculture will look a long time before another Ezra Benson. That's win I say we'd bettef on to him while we've got him." S *TOR J< nught "'TO U, Was n «S he,,, V 1 '"lias ,;""! cole > the , '*) . l"'».,,is, &w e«son's | ' "> Viol; ;u,o, I \i is i'oia xi \i w s. April
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