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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
File 004
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 004. 1956-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1053.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-04). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 004. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1053

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956 - File 004, 1956-04, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1119/show/1053.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 4, April 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date April 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript DOWN TO EART Any solution to the farm problem must, of necessity, consider not only farmers, but urban dwellers as well — taxpayers all. President Eisenhower advanced what he considered a fair and equitable plan in his message to Congress. The plan is outlined below. PRESIDENT Eisenhower's Nine-Point Farm Plan most likely has been cussed and discussed by any number of informed and uninformed farm operators, as well as by legislators, housewives and businessmen. Doubtless it has also become a matter for much discussion to the staunch chew-and-spit crowd who congregate on street corners. Farmers, in all likelihood the greatest individualists in America, are always sensitive to a shift in the wind of governmental interference. A panacea offered for the agricultural barometric disturbance was Eisenhower's Nine-Point Farm Plan. Some farmers are no longer sure of their "ground," for the Hydra-headed farm plan presents problems peculiar to certain areas, and its many ramifications are not always discernible per se. To some farmers it seems a veritable lifeline; to others it appears to be a strangle hold unequaled in modern times, marketing quotas notwithstanding. Additionally, the President is said by some to be assiduously wooing a rustic maid in order that he may marry the rural vote. Election campaign hoopla to the contrary, the truth of the matter is that the farmer, who generally operates out of the limelight, has become, hyperbolically, the cynosure of all eyes. And now the farmer regards those eyes, perhaps with some justification, as too often astigmatic and myopic. Undeniably, the farmer's difficulty is no Johnny-come- lately thing; it is a problem of long standing. He is caught in a squeeze play — squeezed between rising prices for the things he buys, and declining prices for the things he sells. Furthermore, it has long been a matter of record that as the agricultural economy goes, so goes our entire social order — economically speaking, that is. Two of our greatest farm problems are the utilization of pre-existing stock, and a sensible way to diminish output. If these two problems can be dealt with concurrently. Page 2 perhaps the farmer will no longer be getting there (W bank) "latest with the leastcst." . s President Eisenhower, in his message on farm P1'"1'1.] sent to Congress on January 9, 1956, stated that CtP farm problems needed prompt congressional action- outlined the causes of these problems as follows: First - production and market distortions, the result j wartime production incentives too long continued. Second current record livestock production and n09 record crop harvests piled on top of previously accumuia« carry-overs. Third - rising costs and high capital requirements. ^ One of the greatest problems facing our nation •> ever-growing surplus. These surpluses are the res" wartime production incentives which were continues long after the war. Disposal efforts have been inclh't By way of explanation, for each hypothetical bushel ^ given commodity sold, one and a half bushels have stockpiled to take its place. One is reminded of the; climbing stairs in the dark—he takes one step up and ■ down two. And, were it not for these mounting SUTPJ currently farmers would be getting more moncv M commodities which they sell. ^^ Until 1954 there was 90 per cent of parity p port, a practice still favored by a great many 1 ,| However, the Agricultural Act of 1954, passed <J**| partisan support, was felt by many to be a step in t'1 J direction. It brought price flexibility, which was a&Q to keep commodity supplies in balance with niar'<^S!,r0l' than 60 different survey groups and more than 500 1 J nent farm leaders participated in the study that a develop the Agricultural Act. Agricultural eo J research institutions, mail from thousands of farm' * A farm organizations all contributed to this bipartrS' p' ture. Essentially, it replaced the 90 per cent price S"*j| with "flexible* supports. These flexible supp<>rts Jf (Continued "" Fai is Forum News, Ap" JUDGIN lowed mi tree' tent of par; distress for Unfortui to the aver *ho refuse '"nil philos ilrin incom. "n'ng concr The Ser *d not ado Parity price karvi the 8 deluded tl P'oportion i lv-'s similar! °r'its voted Why, tl, SuPports sh. The rea< ?°»ipelling * billion si th« third q, Holer's doll 1,1 1951 t,, 3 fj'tely that '''"t incom r"sl'cctively It was tl Unl«s immt 'ncome, the Wead into We con; l0"me, and
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