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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931 - File 003. April 10, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/94/show/92.

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(April 10, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/94/show/92

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931 - File 003, April 10, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/94/show/92.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 10, April 10, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 10, April 10, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date April 10, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR The Cougar Scientist NO. 3 SCIENTIFIC HUMOR > Portia: I looked over the textbook for the meaning of an amalgam. Prof. Bishkin: Yes, but not in it. * A German scientist converts wood into food. Now "board and rooms" can be taken literally.—South Bend Tri- •bune. A Potent Brain Food Dear Sir; I cheerfully recommend, ■ *your sardines as a brain food. I was lost in the mazes of chemistry. After eating one box of your sardiens, I, thoroughly understood all about electrons. If Sir Isaac Newton had based his, calculations on a skirt we observed yesterday, instead of on the apple, the thoughtful old boy would have concluded that the law of gravitation worked in the opposite direction. No, Nora, Sir Isaac Newton did not invent fig newtons. f . * * * What? Professor: So you've never used sodium stearate? Student: No, sir; what is it? * Professor: Soap! Rah for the Muzzle ^ Willie: "Did Mr. Edison make the first talking machine, Pa?" Pa: "No, my son. God made the first talking machine, but Edison made •the first one that could be shut off. Reaction and Reduction We now have before us the question I *of a simple reaction, followed by the • application of a reducing agent, i.e., a, ' drunken man in a restaurant by a pimple reaction combines with every- ^ thing in reach; but the proprietor act*- a' a reducing agent. | Example: Young lady cashier rushes I .out excitedly and calls in the proprie- * tor. Proprietor rushes to drunken ' man at the counter, feels his pockets, 1 and recovers a bottle of ketchup, salt *and pepper. A further effect of the reduction, is to precipitate a ten-dollar bill into the cash register. Scientists have produced a more permanent finish for cars, but nothing yet invented beats a locomotive. nice and safe i need is a gaa , Of course helium is around fire, but what \ that is safe to step on Anthropologists always go away from home to search for the missing link. Thanks for the compliment.— Toledo Blade. A prehistoric skeleton has been found, its legs wrapped around Its neck. This would seem to indicate • that the rumble seat is older than we 1 supposed. Fire Extinguishers BY RICHARD MOELLER , There are fires caused by many different kinds of substances. Some of these fires can be extinguished by water, others can not. The main pur* " pose in attempting to extinguish a fire is to prevent oxygen from coming in contact with the flame. Fires caused by ordinary sources can not burn without oxygen. When a substance like oil is burning water is of little value, because the oil is lighter than the ■ water and it therefore floats on top of the water. - Sand, earth, or sawdust is the best method of extinguishing a lighter than water substance. Sawdust i" better than sand or earth because it will float on top of the burning fluid and thus it cuts off the supply of oxygen from the flame. Many chemicals have been used for • the extinguishing of flames. Attempts have been made to employ certain gases which do not support combustion, and that can be obtained com- * mercially at a fairly cheap rate. The advantages of this method are doubt ful. If the flame is in the open there r is a draft of hot air that forms a rapid upward current which would draw the extinguishing gas upwards and out of the region of the flame. This method can be used in a closed area where the gas can be applied without escap ing. An example of this is: If there were a chimney on fire, the combustion could be stopped by throwing a handful of sulfur on the fire in the grate. The sulfur burns, forming sulfur dioxide which is drawn into the chimney by the draft. The sulfur dioxide takes the place of the oxygen by forcing it out of the chimney. As soon as the oxygen is excluded from the flame the fire is extinguished. Due to the fact that certain gases and salts will extinguish a fire under certain conditions, many different types of apparatus have been designed. These various types of apparatus vary in size from the pint milk bottle to the motor driven fire truck. Some of the gases that have been used successfully for this purpose are: Carbon dioxide, hydrochloric acid gas, and ammonia, none of which support combustion. Some of the salts which are used are common salt and borax, tungstates, and phosphates of the alkali metals. These salts form a protective coating on the surface which is burning and this excludes the oxygen. Chemical extinguishers may be divided into two classes. One class is the extinguisher that contains liquid carbon dioxide i n a capsule, that can be pierced when ready for use, or the gas generated rapidly from a charge of some carbonate, such as sodium carbonte, in the presence of an acid and a large volume of water. When the gas forms it causes a great pressure to be exerted. This pressure causes the carbon dioxide gas to be dissolved in the water. The force of the gas causes the carbon dioxide and the water to pass through the small hole or nozzle in the extinguisher on to the flame. As soon as the water which has the carbon dioxide in it reaches the outside air it gives up the gas. The gas together with the water passes to the flame where it drives away the oxygen. The water has a cooling effect upon the burning surface. The salts which are in solution also coats the burning surface. All these combined effects help to cool and extinguish the flame. Sodium carbonate and sulfuric or hydrochloric acid are usually employed to give the rapid evolution of the gas. These chemicals must be kept separate in the apparatus until the time when the extinguisher is ready to be used. There are several methods employed to keep the components of the mixture separate. One method to obtain this is to place the acid in a thin glass bottle which is left unsealed, at the top qf the apparatus, and have the carbonate dissolved in the water contained in the extinguisher. When the apparatus is ready to be used it is turned upside down, this permits the acid to run-out of the bottle and mingle with the sodium carbonate that is in the solution. The rapid evolution of the gas occurs immediately. Another method of keeping the acid separate_ is to place it in a sealed bottle. This bottle is either broken by the release of a weight in the apparatus or by a blow on a plunger from outside. In the large type of extinguisher the bottle containing the acid is sealed by a lead capsule. This capsule can be pierced by a lever on the outside of; the apparatus. The second class of extinguisher contains solutions of chemicals which coat the combustible materials. Some of these chemicals give off gases, which do not support combustion, when they are heated. A very effective solution of this type is one that contains sodium sulfide and ammonia chloride. When this is thrown upon a fire sulfur dioxide and ammonia gas are given off. These gases smother the fire, and at the same time a glaze of common salt is formed on the surface of the burning material. For small fires in a closed area the chemical extinguishers have proved very useful, hut for fires in the open, that have gained considerable headway, they are practically useless. A fire can be rapidly and easily extinguished when it is attacked in the early stages of its development, but in many cases fires originate during the night or when no one is present. Thi* permits a fire to gain considerable head way before it is noticed. To comba this many automatic devices have been devised, such as sprinklers. When LIBRARY CLUB MEETS The Junior College Library Club held its second social meeting Thursday, March 26, at the home of Mary Adele Cobb. Those attending were Mm. L. W. Shearer and the members including Misses Iona Brown, Isabella Ventresca, Jeannette Willman, Eleanor Stanfield, Mildred Lark in, Helen Tom- lin. Mrs.- Shearer's daughter, Mrs, Hudgins, attended as the guest of honor. The meeting was called to order and a literary program followed. Miss Willman gave a talk on "Lighting in the Library," Miss Stanfield recited "Captain Siren," Miss Brown gave an interesting article on "Sinclair Lewis," the Noble prize winner, and Miss Cobb gave some readings on Jonathan Swift, the literary character, by Wm. Makepeace Thackeray. Mrs. Shearer, the librarian and organizer of the club, contributed to the program with some readings on a "Cruise to Europe." After the completion of the program, a luncheon course was served, the Easter holiday motif being carried out. The meeting then adjourned with bright prospects in mind for future meetings, judging from the already successful past affairs. If the club progresses as rapidly in accomplishments and spirit as heretofore, the Houston Junior College will have a library club of predominance to look forward to in the years to come. INITIATION Cougar Collegians, pep club, held its first initiation for the spring term in Mrs. Bender's office at 7:10 p.m. Monday, March 30. Edith Lord, the new member, received congratulations from Genevieve Weldon, president, and other club members. Hazel Taylor, treasurer, made quest for all club members to pay their spring term dues sometime in the near future. MRS. SCOTT HONORED . Mrs. Harvey Scott, nee Ruth Kidd, formerly president of the Pep Club, was honored by the Cougar Collegians Saturday afternoon at an informal tea given at the home of Miss Genevieve Weldon, president of the society. ■Mrs. Scott was also president of the Cougar Collegians during the time that she was a student at Junior Collej In the receiving line were Rena Mae Butler, Hazel Taylor, Lucille Cafcalas, Mrs. John R. Bender, and Mrs. Kidd, mother of the honoree. Decorations carried out the color scheme of pink and green, while table decorations of sweet peas and roses added charm to the scene. The social commitee representing (he Collegians was composed of the following members: Maurine Edmin- ster, Maurine Keach, Nelwyn Turner, and Marie Coppin. FRESHMEN MAKE" PLANS Plans for the annual Freshman picnic were discussed Wednesday evening at a called meeting of the class. Tentative plans for the event were agreed upon, one of which is that the picnic will be held on the first week in May. On that date all freshmen will take their bathing suits, and their lunch baskets and go to the San Jacinto river club. A minimum fee of fifteen cents has been decided for the expenses of the nesday, April 15. The H. J. C. team picnic. | will meet the visitors in an annual de bate in the regular general assembly program in the auditorium. Revenge lurks in the mind of Coach Harris—revenge for a defeat suffered last year in Beaumont in a similar debate. This contest is over the Free Trade question, also. HONORARY SOCIETY MEETS Members of the H. J. C. Honorary Society met Wednesday, April 8, at hich time a constitutino was adopted, also a pin to be worn by the members. Those who belong to this organiza- sn have made an average grade of B. The next meeting of the -society will be held on April 12, at 3 p.m., at the home of Mrs. Floyd P. Soule. Mrs. Soule states that many of those eligible for the society have not attended. The newly elected officers are: President, Earlene Gunn; vice-president, Marie Coppin; secretary, Louise Shepperd; treasurer, Ruth Wheeler. MRS. SHEARER RETURNS College students are glad to welcome Mrs. Hanna Shearer, school librarian, back after her ten days' illness. Mrs. Shearer was hit by a Ford truck while walking across a street intersection near the school building. She was knocked down and severely bruised. Again we say we are glad that she s able to be back with us. MRS. OBERHOLTZER IMPROVING Mrs. E. E. Oberholtzer, wife of Superintendent Oberholtzer of the city schools, is rapidly convalescing according to the latest reports given out by attendants. On Saturday Mrs. Oberholtzer was able to go for a short automobile ride. She is just recovering from a severe attack of influenza last ig some eight or nine'weeks. Miss Violet Herbert is back at school fter several days' absence due to illness. Miss Sammy Lane Fowler is report ed to be still in the hospital at Cam- i, Tex. Miss Fowler was a student at H. J. C. last semester. sprinklers are used the room of the building is fitted with a system of pipes which have nozzles on the ends of them. These nozzles have a seal in them that consists of some easily fusible metal. If there is any serious rise in temperature the seals will melt. When the seals hav melted, water sprayed throughout the room. Fusible alloys have also found use In the lease of fireproof doors, windows, etc. With these automatic sprinklers, tomatic alarms have ben placed in buildings. These alarms sound at any convenient place, such as a fire sta 'tion. There are various methods employed for the action of these alarms. Some alarms work due to the equal expansion of the metals, others work due to the relative expansion of large and small masses of the same metal. The main purpose in all the automatic alarms is to complete thi electric circuit and thus ring the bell SUMMER SCHOOL— (Continued from Page 1) rapid g»owth and support it is begin' ig to stand among the leading edu cational institutions in the state." Several new courses are included in the program foi the summer. Outstanding among these is education 213-1, the study and application of the methods of teaching industrial arts the elementary schools. It is especially designed for the training of the teach- in directing projects and instructing under the integrated curriculum. Of interest to teachers and present .A. candidates is the proposed course t special physics. This is a general physics course with less problem work, planned to satisfy degree requirement; and supply the student with a basic knowledge of physics. Applicants may register June 1 and 2. Late registrations, accompanied by the regular fee will me accepted June 3 through 8. No registration for credit may bi made after that date. Further information and detailed programs may be obtained in the Houston Junior College administration office. VISITING TEAMS— (Continued from Page 1) calas will debate a girls' team from South Park Junior College of Beaumont in the general assembly program. Wednesday, April 15. Today witnesses verbal battles between debating taems from Westminster Junior College at Tehuacana and from H. J. C. FIREMAN HURT— (Continued from Page 1) drew up, and whisked the unconscious man to a hospital. ;'s all in the day's work of a fireman; you can't fight fires standing in the street," remarked a husky fighter when questioned by a man standing The fire was not discovered until it had gained considerable headway. As the first arrivals came near the house they saw the family sitting quietly eating their evening meal while the roof blazed above them. C. A» Scanlon, manager of a nearby cafe, was one of, the first arrivals. He dashed into the house to warn the occupants. An elderly man who was sitting at the table arose suddenly and dashed up the stairs to the second floor. The restaurant man followed to the top of the stairs where he found the man had slumped down in a fain^ within a few feet of the fire. With the help of others in the house, the old man was carried away from danger. For about 20 minutes fire burned fiercely; but with the arrival of sev- ral fire companies the flames began to slacken and soon were entjrely extinguished. The extent of damage is not known exactly. The roof and upper floor were ruined by fire, while water greatly aged the remainder. The building frame structure of a rather old- fashioned type and is surrounded by similar structures. The fact that there was very little wind probably prevented far greater damage to the neighborhood. The house is the property of Mrs. J. C. Foster who is the widow of the late General Foster, Civil War veteran and one-time commander of the United Confederate Veterans. CHORAL PROGRAM— (Continued from Page 1) negro spiritual called, "Couldn't Hear Nobody Pray." A solo number was presented by Vida McGriff who had made 5 A's in her courses. A mixed chorus of voices singing "I'm Alone Because I Love You," and "When Your Hair Has Turned to Silver." Dean D. E. Fox, who is also the director of the choral club, explained that there were 355 students enrolled in the Negro Junior College. Mr. Dupree thanked the singers in behalf of the Houston Junior College, and invited them to return again next. year. Other numbers on the program were: "Holy Unto the Lord," by hte girls' quintet; "Down by the Riverside," boys' quintet; "Couldn't Hear Nobody Pray," Vida McGriff and girls; "Oh, Mary, Don't You Weep," boys' quintet; "Popular Songs Group," mixed chorus; "Smoked a Cigar," boys' group. SCHOLARSHIP COUNTS— (Continued from Page 1) into the high-salaried groups as those I who graduate in the lowest third. Gen- Both boys and girls will debate the erally speaking the men with the proposition, "Resolved, That the Na- highest scholastic records get the most tions of the World Should Adopt a responsible jobs and the best salaries Policy of Free Trade." | afterward. A number of large corpo- One contest started at 5:00 p.m., the rations have standing offers open with other starts at 9:30. The music room | various colleges to give good jobs to on the first floor is trie scene of ac- the leading scholars in every class. tion. And don't think the college students Phil Hamberger and Gordon Jones haven't waked up to that fact long will represent H. J. C. in the boys' j ahead of the public in general. At contest, while Elizabeth Sinclair and Amherst recently 80 per cent of the Lucille Cafcalas debate in the girls'] senior class indicated that they prized division. Phi Beta Kappa (scholarship society) Coach Harvey W. Harris has prom- ahead of any other college distinction, ised two splendid debates. Last Fri- Yale students have often indicated a day, at Tehuacana, Jo Ed Winfree similar preference. ceded first place in an oratory. contest The college students who get mixed to a Westminster boy, and the teams up in booze parties and the like get determined to avenge the loss. This debate is a scheduled meet of the Texas 'Junior College Public Speaking Association. For the first time this year, Houston Junior College is a member of the organization. South Park Junior College of Beaumont sends a girls' team here Wed- the publicity. The ones who work at their studies get the jobs. It has been written: He that bloweth Not his own horn The same shall Not be blown.
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