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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 003. November 9, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/7.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 9, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/7

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 003, November 9, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/7.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 3, November 9, 1932
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date November 9, 1932
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR PAGE THREE GIRL OUTDOOR CLUB SPONSORS OLD TIME BARN DANCE IN GYM Junior College's student body turned out en masse to the Halloween dance of the Outdoor Girls' Club. The affair was a masquerade party although many who came did not wear costumes or masks. Shortly after 9:30 the gym begai fill with students' and their friends who had come to celebrate, with littl thought that they were at a religious celebration, and that the masks that they wore were an outgrowth of the mummery plays that they used to have in England in the period between Chaucer and Shakespeare. Costumes of all countries and all eras were worn by the dancers. Tha costumes made the group look like an international convention of folk-lorists who had refused to give up the traditions of their respective countries. The grand march was started after there had been some attempted square dancing. It was led by Allen Marshall, the spieling master of ceremonies, and Evelyn Cochrane, one of those pajama clad twins. The costumes were judged by the members of the faculty who had been appointed by the members of-the club. The pri?:e winners wore Nora Louise Calhoun and Elmer Hamilton. Nora was dressed in a suit of men's underwear of the style in vogue about 1890 and over that she had n very old, glass-beaded dress. She wore heavy cotton stockings and some overshoes. The prize was a paper skeleton which was later presented to Mr. Hooker by Elmer Hamilton who seemed to have some idea of humor but could not put it over even enough to convince himself that it was humor. Elmer Hamilton received the prize for the most unique* boys' costume. He was dressed in whatever he had found when he cleaned out his closet. He had found a pair of spats (those he wore at the freshman dance last year), an old pair of shorts, a very loud and multi-colored pajama jacket of Chinese and Russian design, last year's freshman tie and a black tarn with a feather stuck in it. A mask with bells on it completed this cockeyed costume. Hamilton claimed that he was the League of Nations. He said. "The spats aro English, the jacket is Chinese, the green tie is Irish and the tarn is either Scotch or French, depending on the slant that I wear it." Music was furnished by the Old Timers, but it was at least an excuse and that was all that was needed for every one to have a perfectly g-r-a-n-d time. The girls sold popcorn and soda water. Two blackfaces wearing pe.iamas bought some of the fluffy stuff aTid couldn't get it through the small mouth openings of their masks. Someone remarked, displaying their usual intelligence. "Oh! doesn't that popcorn stand look pretty." "After all, when the old fashioned girl said (hat, she was only gold digging," remarked Donald Aitken. Izzy was another barker but couldn't find the right tree to bark up. And so on through the crowd, every one had a laugh that will probably continue for the next year anyway. CAN YOU IMAGINE— —Mr. French without his spats? —How old Leeds Bayless is? —Mr. Birney taking an assignment after the "dead line"? —Jimmy Cou'son with black hair? —Mack Douglas not snooping into your "personals"? —Paul N. acting like a saint? —The nerve of the Prof who give; test after a full moon nite? —H. A. Willrich rushing the ladies' —Helen Tomlin unshadowed by her B. F., Tom Barker? —Jesse Darling being anything else? —Where Ruth Sparks got the name "Spark Plug"? —An operation taking place in the conservatory? Ask Jack Blackburn and Buck Rogers. PHONEY LETTERS Dear Dad: You asked in your last letter what I was doing in school. Well, I guess reck and neck just about describes the actions of any college student? Hoping we all develop giraff-like, I am, Your son, HAROLD RENFRO. Paul Nordling: In reply to your note as to when beef was the highest, the answer is when the cow jumped over the moon. Economically yours, PROF. S. W. HENDERSON. Blanche Dekel, Chem. Student: In reply to your question as to why the earth is heavier in the winter than it is in the summer—the only an- sewer I can give is that in the winter time everybody has on an overcoat. Scientifically, SAMUEL L. BISHKIN. To The Cougar: Please publish this. Several psychology students have expressed a desire to know what the shape of their noses indicate. A sharp nose indicates curiosity. A flat nose indicates too much curiosity. A. L. KERBOW, Phychology Instructor. To the H. J. C. Students: After long and painful hours of research and study, we wish to announce the following statistics: Out of every 100 marriages, 50 per cent of the per- COUGAR BOARD OF STATISTICS. Mack Douglas, Editor "Burp": Please enter my subscription for 11 copies of the Burp. Your paper is very useful in my business. Before a football game I let every man on the squad read a copy. If he is in a good humor—it will make him fighting mad. Ti' he is already mad—it will make him madder. So that when the team takes the field they are in the right mood for destruction. Yours for more Burps, COACH A. W. FRENCH. Dean Dupre, H. J. C: Just a note to inform you that I am stopping my daughter, Nelda, from attending your horrid school. You mu.it have nothing but thieves enrolled—for 1 read in the last Cougar where some teacher had her face lifted. For honest schools, MRS. SMITH. Handsome Hamp Robinson, Houston Junior College: After one of our representatives saw iu at the Hallowe'en dance, we have proposition to make to you. As you should recall you won the prize for wearing the ugliest mask. When our igent found out that you didn't oven :nve on a mask, he wired us of your lossibilities. In short, we want you to ioss for Hallowe'en masks and funny ares. We feel that with your natural ability you should be able to "go over". That is, you should have no difficulty n being ugly. Some people are ugly, Jut vou seem to abuse the privilege. Also this job may lead to a better me, because anyone with your looks could easily get a job at haunting Yours for life-like masks, BOO-HOO SCAREM MASK CO. Field Hockey Will Be Added to Junior College List of Sport Events Interest in field hockey has been expressed by so many students of H. !. that the Athletic Directors have been considering including it in the list of athletic activies of he college. If this fast and interesting game is put in the school, the college will be introducing a new sport into Houston. Hockey is a fast, cold weather sport which nearly all the older men have played in the field, as it was a popular game several years ago. Ice hockey has grown out of the field game. The sport will not be introduced into the college until near the holidays. J. C. STUDENTS BLAZE TRAIL IN WOODS FOR JUNGLE PARTY Journeying far out into the midst of the dark and gloomy jungles last Sunday night, two score J. C. students drove wild animals from their lairs, built a huge fire, and turned the dangerous jungle into a happy playground. Of course the "jungle" was only the woods bordering the bayou off Mac- Gregor Drive and the "wild animals" were sleeping turtles and harmless birds. But plenty of "eats" were put away and a good time was had by all. Mary Lou Gaines did all the game suggesting and everything was played from football to "post office." George Gayle, Paul Sparks and Harold Renfro kept things hot by acting as chief "fire tenders-" Donald "Suitcase" Aitken did the path making, and thanks to his oversized brogans, several forest fires were "stomped" out. Naturally Bill Goggan had his Mar- jorie Cheek along and Hamp Robinson had his Mary B. "Woozy' 'Anderson. Why these two couples remained "lost" throughout the larger part of the night will often be a big mystery. Fairfax Moody took honors as the "All Sqwakie1' by keeping up a continual iine of chatter from start to finish. Carnes Weaver, San Jac student, had his hands full keeping care of Alice Claire "Popeye" Luckel. Some ferocious animal bit Janet "Shorty" Simpson, San Jac co-ed, on the head and for a while it was thought to be Bud Steeger. Later it was learned it was' learned that he spent most of the night pulling himself out of the bayou, so fcnet's "biter" must have been a "pink elephant." (Thanks to Guy Lombardo and his pink elephants.) Fred Aebi ate twice as much as any one except his date, Wilma Lindsey, who forgot all about her diet program. Wilma ate at least two quarts of olives. "When did you last coffee pot" and "truth or consequences" are two questions that came near spelling the doom for "Cisco" Kellogg and John Hill. Hill ^tagged the affair and sang to keep everybody happy and sad. After the "Bring Them Back Alive" part of the night was completed, the mob adjourned to the home of Mary Lou Gaines, where dancing kept up till early in the morning. Broken furniture, crushed ribs, smashed feet, empty heads, and gutter gossip were the chief casualties of the night. No fooling, it was one swell time and did we hav. a good time? "You're telling me." SHORTS AND SPATS BY ELMER HAMILTON ■■III!;; - IHHIH Seeded Tennis Players Named for Approaching Junior College Tourney Having watched Bud Seeger play tennis for several years, it looks like he is a good bet to add the H. J. C. boys' singles tournament to his list of trophies. Last year Steeger entered the tcurr.ament only to come out second place, losing to Vilbrey Karney, Humble Company singles ace. Steeger is a prominent figure in Houston's tennis world and takes part in all local tournaments. His game is that of a well rounded player. His backhand is as strong as his forehand and he is a dangerous man at the net, but slightly erratic is his service, which lacks consistency. San Jacinto sends a star in Al Gardner, who has been playing regularly and has defeated many prominent ten nis luminaries. Providing some dark horse does not show up, Gardner will play in the semi-finals, and it would not be surprising if he and Steeger battled for the title. Of course there is the possibility of a dark horse coming up from the bottom and smashing his way to the championship. And this is probable with such : as John Hill, Charles Walker, Willard Nesmith, F. V. Stough, and Nelson Hinton entered in the contest. Hamp Starred Hamp C. Robinson was a football player of reknowu ability. Hamp made a name for himself, playing quarterback on the Richmond High team. Of course a femme ended up with the sweater, but what else can be expected of the "Gigolo"? Prologue: There might possibly still be one or two readers of this journal who remember what an e/e- opener really is, or rather was; surely this panic hasn't completely ruined everybody. It is for those few fortunate individuals that this explanation is written. (Youse other mugs needn't read this if you don't want to.) So, you lucky dog, in this case the eye- opener is not something to drink, but it is merely the title of something the cat wouldn't even drag home. It might be added that anything printed in this column can be regarded as true until proved otherwise. Also, the soph English students will be glad to know that they are NOT required to memorize any of this prologue. Welton Lee Salm has been going here only a month or so, but he's already justified Mr. Kerbow's confidence in him. Just recently he "kept on talking until he said something." Frances Nesmith finally found out what that "six foot, four" kid's name is. She asked him, and did he blush! Grady Murdock doesn't like to blow his own horn, but somebody has to solicit work for that hand laundry of his. Jordan, the pride of Corsicana, still contends that the only reason the soph girls painted up the freshwomen like they did was to cut down the compe- Anothcr freshman girl who'll bear watching is Ellen Stewart. She would not deliberately lie to a boy, but she won't talk to ore either until she has her fingers crossed. Ever since this writer reported an interesting window "display" at a downtown store. H. J- C. boys have made a point of walking down Tevas Avenue when going from Main to Fannin or vice versa. There might still be three or four studes whom Ruth Depperman hasn't told about the perfect score she made on an Education test. If you veteran inmates of this institution wonder why George Snider no longer SITS out in front of the" building, it's because he "has to economize." And Pat Foby didn't act like he even wanted to be president of the sophomore class. That ends the lecture for today, but there's one more tip for you. Just remember, when buying your winter underwear, it's not the original cost; it's the upcreep. Junior College Students Extend Sympathies to Bereft J. C. Instructor Dr. J. H. Ledlow, father of J. H. Ledlow, auditor and instructor of Business Administration at the Houston Junior College, died -last Wednesday ■light at his home in Denton. At the time of his death Dr. Ledlow was the head of the Education Department at the North Texas State Teachers' College at Denton, Texas. The students and faculty of the Houston Junior College wish to take this oppoitunity in expressing their sympathy to Mr. Ledlow in his bereavement. "Woozy" Has Horse Mary Bradly Anderson or "Woozy," as she is called by many, is contemplating on entering the next horse show to be staged in Houston. And we do not blame her; for she is the proud owner of a large dark bay stallion that is "one of the finest riding horses in Houston. "Star," as her horse is called, s a five-gaited animal and is remarkably fast. At one time, its former owner, thought seriously of entering in some of the races in the Northern states. M. B. keeps her horse at the Gulf Coast Riding Acamedy and invites her friends to come out and "give him the" once over." Riding over the Hermann Park Bridle Path constitutes the main part of Mary B.'s exercise and this ride is made every morning. INTRODUCING ... Loretta Eslinger—Ambition is to be a deep sea diver. Favorite show is the Ritz . . . hobby is riding the Shetland ponies out on Main street. Thinks that Donald Aitken is by far the most handsome boy in H. J. C. Elmer Hamilton—Ambition is to be able to get the left door open on his speedy Whippet without the top falling in. Favorite pastime, believe it or not,-is learning to dance, and his hobby is wearing spats. Miss Ebaugh is Elmer's ideal prof, because she does not have to tell jokes to be humorous. Marian Kobinson—Says that her ambition is to drive a taxi. For a hobby she has chosen Warren Lemmon; consequently her favorite pastime is riding in an Essex. Has no partiality in regard to her professors. Her favorite movie actor is Charley Chase. Bill Stanford—His ambition is to be a policeman. His hobby is to stay in various jails, so he can get all of the information available in regard to his profession. States that his favorite prof is Mr. Miner on account of his lectures being so interesting. N. C. Jensen—Says that he has no ambit'on whatsoever. His hobby hap- pers to be blondes and brunettes, and eating is h's favorite indoor sport. When asked who his favorite prof was he sort of grinned and said "Mr. Birney, because I don't take anything from him." Christine Flanagan—The heighth of Christine's embition is to become a peanut vendress. Next to writing chain letters her hobby is riding on m e r r y-go-r ounds. For pastime, watches the people pass on Main street. Her favorite prof has always been Miss Ebaugh, because she attended Oxford. SNOOPING AROUND WITH RUTHIE llllilier It has just been since school has started in full swing that we have been able to find all of the new students and even some of the old standbys. . . . Girls, have you all met Billy Gandy (no relation to Mahat- ma)? He's the black-haired, blue- eyed lad from Louisiana. We're mighty glad to have you with us, Billy. . . . Seems like old times again seeing Fred Aebi bring Wilma Lindsay to school. . . . Another very attractive new student is Charlotte Steele. . . . Nelda Smith and H. V. Baker seem to be hitting it off pretty steady. ... It is impossible to get through the front entrance without being stopped by Harold Renfro trying to sell tickets for the Play-Boys' dance. . . . We've been watching Sis O'Neil, too—and believe you me, she is plenty cute. . . . Pat Foley is back with us again this year —don't be frightened, freshmen—he really isn't as vicious as he sounds. . . We hear that Alice Clare Luckel is going in for math in a big way—she says she really enjoys it. . . Billy Fitzgerald is a freshman you should all know—he's a mighty good kid. . . . I ask you was Donald Aitken's face red when he was told that he resembled a taxi going down the street with the two back doors open? Don't take it to heart, Donald, we think you have cute little ears. . . Glad, indeed, we are to find - Marian Robinson and Warren Lemmon still hitting off as smoothly as ever. . . Two very attractive sophomores are the inseparable Gaines and Kellogg. ... We find it hard this year not to be able to associate O. D. Brown's name with Nora Louise Calhoun's. . . . Lucille Black is who we term a likeable gal. EUROPEAN TRAVELS— (Continued from Page 1) places they visited during the sumiiier vacation. Mrs. Kenneth Oberholtzer of El Campo was a guest at the meeting. The club officers are as follows: Honorary chairman, Mrs. E. E. Oberholtzer; chairman, Mrs. W. H. Miner; vice-chairman, Miss Sue Thomason; and secretary, Mrs. L. T. Hooker. A Thanksgiving motif will be carried out at the next meeting which will be held at the home of Mrs. Miner.
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