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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 002. November 9, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/6.

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(November 9, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/6

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 002, November 9, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/6.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 3, November 9, 1932
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date November 9, 1932
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR :■;:::.. | Editor Associate Editor Assistant Editors Faculty Advisor. James Julian . Mary Esther Waggoner Hope McCutcheon, L. P. Marshall — .Fred R. Birney Feature! Editors News Editor ... Sports Editors Humor Editor Exchange Editor- Departmental Ruth Depperman, Elmer Hamilton Jesse Darling Milton Gregory, John Hill Jill Jenkins Kitty Hurlock Business Manager Advertising Manager _ __ Minnie Topek . C. W. Skipper • Reporters Ovide Boulet, Mack Douglas, Florence Kendrick. Louise Heydrick, Tommie Cooksey, Harry Flavin. I : Dopey Dan Says .... IS! : I reckon things have begun to pep up around our school—or at least the papers say so. But the funny part that you can't always believe what you read in the papers, because the only time a reporter is on the level i: when he is dead. The papers say we staged a "riot"— I don't know because I was just or the bottom of a medley of arms, legs, and other, parts of the human anatomy. But I betcha the reporter that wrote that story wasn't even no where near when it happened. He was probably over at the old folks home watchin' a game of bridge; and when he got back to his office he wrote "War Declared By Old Folks: Thousands Hurt" and I betcha he did. Please don't get me wrong. I'm- not incinerating that a reporter would e aggerate, but doggone it, we all kn that by hitting a few keys on t typewriter, anything can possibly "happen". As for the "riot" itself—it was just one of those affairs where everybody has a rang-tang, toot in', good time. You know, something like the other nit- whi n we had them old time fiddlers. It wasn't one of those pink-tea affairs where everybody throws something soft, like cream puffs. In fact, it was a very unsissified get-together. But when some newspaperman, who is good at slinging the cow's husband, writes it up so tad that even Al Jol- son killing little Sonny Eoy or his Mother would seem kinda funny, then it's time for comment. Us frosh and slimes are really sorry if we caused the school any undue trouble- We all love Junior College and would die for her, but the only trouble is that J. C. doesn't need students to die for her—she needs them to keep alive and help her grow. In the first plrce what we staged was not a "riot". We staged a rush. There is nothing like a pood, old-fashioned rush to keep a man in good physical health. Rushes, when taken with dua care and consideration, will tone up the system, add to your general health, and make hair grow on your chest. So if anyone thirks our deportment is tad just because we engaged ourselves in that little tussle— they are wrong. Let's get back to what the paper says: First, it said the glass was broken out of three windows. Everyone connected with the H. J. C. knows that there is no more truth in what a politician says. And there ain't none. However, there were two doors torn off their hinges. Now, those stately old doors have not known strength since they have known splendor. In other words they were just "resting" on their hinges. Some hard-thinking and provident freshman started slamming the doors while his classmates were trying to lower the colors of the upperclassmen. With much malice and forethought he slammed and slammed till the doors dropped off. What he did was a classic performance. As for raiding his fellow classmen, he might just as well have run around the block holler in "Oowah", or butted his head against the sidewalk. Anyway he didn't have nerve enough to get in the melee, but he wanted to do some damage—and hi did. Shame on you freshman, whoever you are. The frosh might have gained trance even at that, but they are any good till they get warmed up— and when they get warmed up, they aro all pooped out. Fearlessness combined with recklessness made thi slimes shout, "Come on, gang. We can get in. They" are wide open." The sophs were wide open—just like a buzz saw. One frosh ducked not soon enough nad got a little halo around h is eye. I don't remember whether "Suitcase" Aitken was in that mass of students that were entangled like a carload of pretzels or not. But he probably wasn't, because anybody with feet the size of Aitken's would be too hard to push over. Readin* poetry might have had something to do with this little hap;- pening. You know, the two classes wore probably insoired by some ancient war god. Like in the old Norse mythology he was called Lokj, or the rpirit of Sock-'E-n-On-The-Chin. In Greece he was called Parnassus among other things. In Junior College he is called Sock-Sometody-And-Hope-It- Will-Be-A-Prof. Anyway the whole t':ing would have been more effective if the frosh had been dressed in leopard skins to look like satyrs, and a brass band had been on hand to play inspiring music. The whole thing was done in the spirit of fun, and there is no hard feelings. Eut those engaged protest when it is called a "riot". We prefer the term "rush". This choice is because "rush" is a gracious, solemn, and graceful ceremony, while "riot" is more acrobatic term. GUTTER GOSSIP MEN'S FACULTY— (Continued from Page 1) ith Messrs. Harris and French as his The object of the club is to find out ays of improving college teaching, and what subject matter should be The club meets on the second and dnesdays of each month at the Bluebell for luncheon. A program follows. Kitty Hurlock should have realized that her attempt to bring out the fad of using "blue lipstick" would never be a big success. The males have something to say about that. Red lipstick is hard enough for a boy to wipe from his lips, but BLUE! Why, don't they use spotted lipstick and then every time a boy was kissed on the cheek (do they kiss on the cheek any e) it would look like he had the chicken pox. Were we amused at the "jungli party" two Sundays ago? Donald Suitcase" Aitken, soph president, has exceptionally large feet, size 12 to be exact, so he was appointed to stomp the paths down to the bayou. Oh boy! You should have seen some of those paths. One path was at least two feet wide. Don't you sophs miss Jean Weath- erall, Lee Stone, "Windy" Smith, Marion Adams and Harry Matthaws. They are all making good at the colleges they are attending. , John Hill, "Doggie" to you, tells us of a ranch where he spent part of his summer. It's called Buck's and lere is what it's liks. Clear cold tream of fresh water for swimming, .large mountain in the distance. Good horseback riding. Excellent hunting. Fine fishing. Good-looking waitress at the ranch. All one can eat. Good vd goes there Guess some of the J. C. lads will have to look into this. Sounds like heaven to us. We firmly believe that Adolph Marks ts a secret passion for Ruth Depper an, school beauty. Adolph has taken Ruth to several shows and soon strut with her out to the night clubs. Oh, guurrls, don't you just know that Adolph shakes a wicked hoof and looks divine in a tux. Yoo hoo, "Ady". And now for the grand finale. We we asked five popular students in school how they voted yesterday and here are the answers: Harold Renfro: "I voted for Roosevelt 'cause he is a prohibitionist, believes in the 15-hour-a-day working schedule and believes in the reduction of wages for the poor and increase of the wages of the rich." Vernon Scott: "Andy Gump was my choice for the presidency because he wears a no mans' collar and is kin to the rich Uncle Bim." Nelda Smith: "I voted for Ma Ferguson because I did not' like the way Sterling handled the Word War situation." Mary B. Anderson: "Will Rogers got my vote for president as he will probably stage a big rodeo on the White House lawn and I will get a chance to show off my horse." (For the benefit of the unlaarned, M. B. is a personal frieod of Will Rogers, bavin* been introduced by Hamp Eob.n&cn at a recent dance.) Fairfax Moody: "I cast my vote for Clark Gable because he has such beautiful toenails." Editor's Note: Thank the Lord this column is ended. DRAMATIC CLUB— (Continued from Page 1) women and conceited;, well possibly th; last part any way. -Christine Flanagan a blushing bride and so sweet she could kiss herself. We'll do our own kissing, if you please. —Evelyn Cochran getting her man without a shotgun. -Frances Bates with a very innocent daughter of 16. —Alexander Gardener trying to be more like George Adams LeFevers than tho original. —Bob Stalling a crook Our suspicions ares now confirmed. —Lou Johnson mahogany colored and ' officious ;yes officious. —Israel Robinowitz dignified, dumb, and helpless; th; second is a fact. —Ariel Is Kit ridge, Innocent, in love for the first time, sweet sixteen and never bean kissed (up our sleeve), Ha! Ha! —Dorothy Golden an extortionist—No, we know how she got that big fur coat. —Minnie Topek an old maid school teacher. We have also heard of Minnie the Moocher. —Naedell Mills a maid and flirting with anything that wears pants. —Bill Stanford a maid hustler. WORLD HIKER HAS NOT SLEPT IN BED FOR SEVERAL YEARS By Hope McCutcheon Around the world in six years—that's the record Jack Lavich is out to make, and from, all indications he's well on the way, for he has just four more years to go. Mr. Lavich, a native of'Russia and a naturalized American, paid the Houston Junior College a visit Monday to study the attitude of the students. He's been on his hike for two years and intends to be back in New York about 1936. "I've already been half-way around the world," he explained, "and have visited Russia, the Baltic States, Germany, and Poland. "The next lap of my journey will include Mexico, Central America, and some parts of Asia and Africa." Mr. Lavich is a social research worker and is making this around-the- world hike to study the attitudes of the different countries. In comparing the attitudes of the various countries, Mr. Lavich said that out of every five automobiles on the highways in Germany he was asked if he wanted a ride. In America, out of every 400 automobiles that pass him on the highways, he is asked by the driver if he wants a ride. "This might seem like a reflection on the American," he said, "but sometimes traveling on the German highways not five cars are j during the entire day." When asked about some of his experiences while hiking, Mr. Lavich . that during the entire two years that he has been on this tour he hasn't slept in a bed. "I probably wouldn't know what a bed is," he laughed. "I haven't slept in one since I started hiking, I usually sleep in barns or under the trees at night. "One of my most thrilling experiences, however, was the trip from St. Louis to New Orleans. I traveled 47 days down the Mississippi River in a row boat from St. Louis to New Orleans. 'From New Orleans I hiked to Beaumont and then to Houston," he said. "After I leave Houston I'm hiking to San Antonio and from there to Mexico." Mr. Lavich has made a study of the Russian five-y;ar plan and declared that in that country it is a complete success, but he believes that other countries think it a failure. 'The power that the Communists have ovar the people in Russia is disgusting," he said, "unless a man is a ember of the Communist party hs is no chance of ever holding any sort of office. "However, the way things stand now, Russians have more personal freedom than before the revolution, but they work much harder. "The young people are real democrats and their ideals and attitudes ill be the salvation of the country." According to Mr. Lavish, Roosevelt will be our next president, if the reports he has heard are interpreted •rectly. Everyone believes that this country needs a cbsmge in government and many Republicans plan to vote for the Democratic nominee,' 'he said. Mr. Lavich came to New York from Russia when he was eight years old :th his parents. He has attended Northw3stern University in Evanston, ois. While in Houston he spoke to several grouos of students at the Sam Houston High School and members of the Y. M. C. A. WHY ADVERTISE— (Continued from Page 1) buvs a dozen bars of Life Net soap. John has been taking two baths a day, and has a reputation of being the neatest man in his community, but he now takes five baths daily, scrubbing thoroughly each time with Life Net soao. The soap manufacturing company, hv a cp"cial process, make thsir soap deodorizing, but forget to deodorize the soap. John now smells like a mixture of creosote and horse-hoof glue, but he feels perfectly secure. He is now using Life Net soap. EXCHANGE EXCERPTS By Kitty Hurlock Papers were received in exchange during the past week from many sections of the United States. Probably the most distant was received from St. Benedict, Oregon. The Pacific Star is the name of their interesting paper. It is a six-column paper, and the JArst school papar we have ever seen that has an editorial policy. There was an interesting feature story on the college as it was 50 years ago. —H. J. C— Pat Foley: I was hit by an automobile last week and knocked senseless. Johnny Nicholson: When do you expect to get better? —H. J. C— Hamp Robinson: What Mormon has eighty wives? "Woozy": Bring 'em Young. —h. j. a— A dear old lady seeing a little boy playing in a mud puddle hastens to reprove him. "My dear child," she exclaimed, "get out of that puddle at once." "Go find a puddle for yourself," retorted the indignant rascal, "I saw this one first." —H. j. c— From Memphis, Tenn., comes the Humes High Herald. It is an attractive journal printed on slick paper. There seems to be a vogue there to see who can grow the longest fingernails. —H. J. C— When the roll is called up yonder, wp wonder who will be the first to —H.J.C.— Sunny California sends us the Muh- sette from the city of Marysville. The school recently took a straw vote on the presidential election. The results were not tabulated in time to gat into their last issue, but the pre-election interest was keen. Their paper con-, ains no jokes, but it has several well- written columns. An attractive sport page occupies page four. —h. j. a— LeRoy Melcher: Loan me a nickel to go see the sea serpent. Richard MacFcc: Such wastefulness; here is a magnifying glass. Go look at an earthworm. —H. J. C— The only daily high school newspaper in the world is published by the Short- ridge High School of Indianapolis, Ind. They claim to be not only the only school to put out a daily, but also the first school to attempt the task. —H. J. C— Don't worry if your job is small And your rewards are few, Remember that the mighty oak Was once a nut like you. —H. J. C.— The Pilot from Port Arthur, Texas, issues a six-column paper with two of the six pages being devoted to sports. Alumni news is particularly featured. The girl pep squad, the "Red Hussars," have been furnished with new uniforms for the ensuing year. —h. j. a— Jessie Darling: You should have s^en Wilma run the quarter mile. Mac Douglas: What did she run it in? J. Darling: I forget what you call the darn things. —H. J, C.— H. E. Blalock says some of the greatest discoveries have baen made by accident. For example he says he discovered that by keeping a bottle of k handy he can use his fountain psn just like any other pen without going to the trouble to fill it. —H.J.C.— The Alcee Fortier High School of New Orleans sends us a copy of their eight-pags, slick-paper publication. A feature on Huey Long's son merits the attention of the readers of this paper. The Kingfish's son favors crumbling in preference to his father's choice of dunking cornbred in pot-liquor. Student government seems to be in evidence, for a heated presidential campaign is in full progress. The No- Home-Work party is the favorite in the coming election, however the Communist party is considered as a possible dark horse as they plan to denounce all faculty rule if elected.
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