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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 001. November 9, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 13, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/5.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 9, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/5

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932 - File 001, November 9, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 13, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/9/show/5.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 3, November 9, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 3, November 9, 1932
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date November 9, 1932
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript DIRECTORY THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BV THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 9, 1932 H. J. C. PRESIDENT TALKS TO TICKET TEAM MEMBERS PEP CLUB OFFICIALS IKSlJllililiiieB Illllli In a talk Wednesday night, Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer president of the Houston Junior College outlined some of the things that make up salesmanship to Junior College students who are selling tickets to the Elks' charity ball. "The first fundamental is to have faith in what you are trying to sell," Dr. Oberholtzer stated. "The kind of person who sells me, is the person who is sincere and enthusiastic." Dr. Oberholtzer said to make the person feel as if you were doing him a favor. And above all don't let anyone feel neglected. "The fellow who believes he has something worthwhile and goes out and tries to let the other person know that he is doing him a favor is the real salesman," Dr. Oberholtzer stated. Dr. Oberholtzer told of the many times that he was chased from a house during the time when everyone was selling liberty bonds and thrift stamps. But he always went back. Then turning directly to the drive for ticket sales to the light opera, "The Maid of Manalay," Dr. Oberholter con - tined: "If we could make a big success of the thing (ticket drive) the Elks might let us in on their annual charity drive every year and make it an annual affair for the Junior College. In that way we could finance our own Students' Loan Fund." Dr. Oberholtzer expressed surprise hearing that the Junior College students had sold only 109 tickets up till November 2. "I fully expected you to sell 1000 tickets," he said. Dr. Oberholtzer concluded his talk by saying: "Don't plead for charity or anything like that. Show the person to whom you are trying to sell the ticket, that he is buying something worthwhile." Bender Dramatic Club Will Present Comedy Farce Called 'Hoodoo' Cougar Collegian officers who were recently elected to serve for the following year. They are, left to right: Nora Louise Calhoun, president; Dorothy Frew, vice-president; Florence Borofsky, secretary; and Frances Nesmith, treasurer. The insert is Nora Louise Calhoun. —Courtesy Houston Post Third Cougar Directory Will Sell at New Low Price Level of 15 Cents Monday the Cougar directory, with names, addresses, and telephone numbers of 490 students, went on sale at the astonishingly low price of 15 cents. This is the lowest price for which the directories ■ have ever been sold. The enterprising student may phone that irksome instructor and upbraid him; from the address may compute the mileage involved in a prospective "date"; and may get a class assignment, as well as enjoyable conversation, merely with the little trouble of turning a few pages. Cougar directories are terrible books to have, maybe. The present 1932-1933 issue of the directory is the third issue sponsored by the Cougar Collegians, Houston Junior College's leading girl organization. The tedious work of checking and rechecking, requiring hours of time, is cheerfully undertaken each year by the Collegians. That organization and its sponsor, Mrs. Bender, deserve high praise. Fifteen cents is more than 50 per cent less than the books cost last year. A lower price 'could not be placed upon such a valuable article. Of course every copy is to be sold. Perhaps scalpers will buy up the existing small stock and raise the price. A word to the wise? NOTICE A meeting of the Houston Junior College ice skaters for purpose of organizing an ice hockey team will be held Monday at 7:15 in the conservatory. All students able to skate are urged to attend, as plans for the team and requirements for players will be discussed. MEN'S FACULTY CLUB EECTS OFFICERS At a recent meeting of the Men's Faculty Club, the following members were elected as presiding officers for the ensuing term: W. A. Rees, President; S. A. Bishkin, Vice-President; and A. L. Kerbow, Secretary and Treasurer. S. W. Henderson was named chairman of the Executive Committee Treasurer. S. W. Hnderson was named charman of the Executive Committee (Continued on Page 2) EUROPEAN TRAVELS OF H. J. C. TEACHERS TOLD AT MEETING The Women's Faculty Club held their last meeting at the home of Mrs. BenT der, with Mrs. F. M. Black and Mrs. Shearer assisting the hostess. The main purpose of the evening was a sort of informal gathering of all the members after the summer vacation. Miss Thomason and Miss Ebaugh gave very interesting discussions of the (Continued on Page 3) POLICE REPORTER TALKS TO CLASS ON JOURNALISM Harry McCormick, police reporter of the Houston Press, delivered an interesting talk to the juonrnalism class at the Junior College Monday. In relating his own experience in newspaper work, McCormick stated that he regrets the fact that he had no journalistic training in school and that he has learned what he knows only through experience. He advised no one to choose newspaper work un- they had the necessary enthusiasm for it. 'The policy of a newspaper," McCormick said, "should be to print news as it is found, and not suppress any news from the public. It is not for the press to judge what the public should or should not know. The most important factor is the printing of 'correct news'.'" In street editions, local crime head' lines are preferable because of the additional appeal. Local news is always most interesting, and it should dominate and be conspicuous. "A newspaper should do everything in its power to expose corruption in public trustees, politics, etc. It should stand for the public, and the public should co-operate with the press," McCormick asserted. The speaker explained that in covering local news, it is very important to get pictures whenever they are available, even though considerable trouble must sometimes be taken to get them. The more art, the better according to this speaker. He explained that his job on the police run was interesting, and that considerable competition existed between the Press and Clironicle. He said that they were always on their toes. Closing his talk, McCormick briefly told of some incidents concerning his covering the "Jones case," and the "Young brothers" killings, most of the details of which he obtained for the stories which appeared in the Press. Why Advertise Sixteen Junior College students will comprise the cast of the "Hoodoo," three-act comedy farce, by Walter ■n Hare, which will produced by the John R. Bender Dramatic Club. The* production will be staged in tbe Junior College Auditorium November 21. The play, "The Hoodoo," is listed by its publishers as the third most successful production of the type suitable for amateur presentation. Rating is based on box office sales and copy sales. Mrs. Hooker, the coach of the cast, says that she has never known of the play being unpopular. "Th» Hoodoo" is packed with both humor and suspense. The characters become involved in some of the most compromising situations that when the author saves them from trouble so unexpectedly that the audience sighs with relief. The stage and scenery will be re- finished for the presentation of th© play. The, decorating will be under the supervision of Bill Goggan and John McLelland. The walls of the set will be of a sand finish and the lighting system has been re-arranged. The border decoration has not been decided upon. The dramatic club is standing the expense of this improvement. Last year the club paid for repairs of the curtain and some minor electrical repairs. Leading tbe cast are, Harold Renfro, John McLelland, Christine Flannagan, Evelyn Cochran, and Frances Bates. Others of the cast are Alexander Gardener, Bob Stallings, Lou John- >n, Israel Robinowitz, Arielle Kit- idge, Dorothy Golden, Minnie Topek, Naedell Mills, Bill Stanford, and Lil- in Schwartz. The cast was selected by Mrs. Hooker after the try-outs during the first part of last week. Mrs. Hooker is pleased with the material with which she has to work for this production. She found much more talent in the Dramatic Club than she had expected and could not use all of it in the cast of "The Hoodoo." This talent, she says, will be used in auditorium programs and in the large production of the Dramatic Club in the spring. PARTS BY THE CAST Imagine— —Harold Renfro clever looking.—Practically impossible for Harold. —John McLelland a devil with (Continued on Page 2) BY C. W. SKIPPER Do you feel run down? Do you lie awake at night? Are you thin and run down? If so, you must not read the advertisements. Advertising has become the backbone of the newspapers and magazines, despite the fact that the advertisers pull some "fast" ones. Some magazines picture a thin, underfed lad who permits his girl friend to be insulted by a stranger. She gives the hero of the story the air, and he goes home broken-hearted. He reads an advertisement which states that Robert Strongman will make a different man out of him within a week, etc. The next picture shows him admiring his manly torso. He has gained about 70 pounds, gotten a movie hero's profile, and acquired muscles that would makea professional strong man turn green with envy. The last picture shows him knocking down the mean bully before the admiring gaze of his old girl John Bookworm, head bookkeeper of the public library, reads the ad, and like most other readers, pictures himself in the shoes of the hero. He sends for the free trial offer, receives a still more impressive set of booklets, and sends a week's salary for the equipment that will make a different man of him. Six months later John has lost * badly needed 10 pounds, has been licked by a man half his size, has thrown away the muscle-making gadgets, and has written a letter of complaint to Robert Strongman that he did not have the nerve to mail. He is now in a sanitarium recuperating, yet the advertisers kept their word. He is now a different man. Then take the sad case of Bill Nap. He had a good job as night watchman until he started reading advertising. Sieepum, famous coffee substitute, ran an ad showing a man peacefully sleeping. "Do you stay awake nights?" the ad read. "Then try Sieepum." Now Bill works at night, and of course could not afford to do his sleeping then, but the ad was so attractive that he sent for a sample can of Sieepum. The night after he received his sample he was found sound asleep, and without a stitch of clothes on his body. Thieves had stolen his garments and robbed the store he was guarding. the Then take the pitiful case of Bobby Buterfinger. He had always longed to be a football hero, but had lacked the courage to mix with the other boys. Bobby read an advertisement stating that Abe Polariskiki, all-American draw-back, owed his success to Nutty Grapes, the well-known breakfast food. Of course he did. The $10,000 he was handed for his statement would make a success of anybody. Young Bobby, however, knew nothing of the 10 thousand, so he religiously ate Nutty Grapes for a week, then donned his new uniform, and set forth to do or die for the dear old North Side Pole Cats, the neighborhood foot- bal team. After the scrimmage Bobby was carried home with three broken ribs, a warped collarbone, a black eye, numerous cuts and bruises, and a poor opinion of Nutty Grapes. Suppose we take Life Net soap. You, too, may have B. S. (body smell). Now those advertisers are smart. They tell us that we can't tell ourselves if we have the dreaded malady, and that even our best friends won't tell us. John Sucker reads the ad, pales a trifle, dashes to the drugstore, and (Continued on Page 2) Library Club Holds First Meeting of Year; Officers Elected for Ensuing Term Members of the H. J. C. Library Club met at the home of Mrs. Shearer recently for their first monthly meeting. Those present were Mrs. Hanna - Shearer, Lewis Ruecket, Isabella Ventresca, Mrs. Ruby D. Brittain, Zelda Osborne, Bernice Blackshear, Mabel Smith, Ora Louise Morgan, and Kitty Hurlock. An election was held with the following students elected as officers for the following year: President, Lewis Rueckert; vice president, Mrs. Ruby D. Brittain; secretary, Mabel Smith; treasurer, Bernice Blackshear; chairman of program committee, Zelda Osborne; chairman of social committee, Isabella Ventresca; reporter, Kitty Hurlock. The meeting was then continued with the following program: Bernice Black- shear reported on an article by James Norman Hall, "Too Many Books." Mrs. Brittain gave a talk on "Library in the Future." Zelda Osborne read two poems. Louis Rueckert gave a book review on Pearl Buck's novel, "Sons," a sequel to "Good Earth." Refreshments followed the adjournment of the business meeting.
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