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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931 - File 003. January 14, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/89/show/87.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 14, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/89/show/87

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931 - File 003, January 14, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/89/show/87.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 7, January 14, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date January 14, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR The Cougar Scientist VOL. I NO. 1 Editor's note: This is the first of a series of the Cougar Scientist. Anyone interested in becoming a mem- mer of the staff is Invited to see S. L. Bishkin and obtain details of the organization. Scientific Humor * The following is called: "Give a Sentence with 'Analyze1 and 'Anatomy';" Or "The Ballad of the Love-Sick Medical Student." Here it Is: i My Analyze over the ocean, My Analyze over the se-e-e-ea, My Analyze over the o-cean, Oh—bring-h-a-c- ack—m y Ana—t o—m y-e-e-e-ee! • Asker—So you're working on an Invention that will make you rich? Teller—It's a phonograph record that will explode after it's played the ■ sixth time straight. It may be, aa scientists assert, that earthworms really sing, but the intelligent maintain a heavy silence when one wishes to mobilize a few of them for fishing purposes. "Gosh! what makes it so cold in "The electric refrigerator just got struck by lightning," The new Einstein theory is published in a six-page pamphlet selling for twenty-five cents. On the other hand one can make heads or tails out of quarter. A biologist says woman's sense of humor is largely passive. Well, well, being humored is the passive of * humor. Power Pick-Me-Up: A London chemist has been trying the effect of • a new tonic on a mouse. He was more than satisfied, we understand, when the little creature put its tongue out at the cat. "I see this medicine is good Eor mar or heast." . "Yes," said the druggist. "Gimme a bottle. I believe that is the right combination for my hus- Advancing Column: The Chinese, he said, are intelligent, but are still ignorant of modern science. They have plenty of backbone, which is 1 gradually coming to the front. —Pasadena (Calif.), paper. Explosives Explained By Royal E. Neuman The discoveries in chemicals and their preparation and use have been so enormous In the past twenty years that it has affected many branches of the manufacturing industry. ! . One of the greatest effects that it has had on this industry is that it has been necessitated that the guns now being manufactured n made many times stronger than those fired two decades ago. The newly discovered chemicals and their significant use in the line of explosives were of great aid recent World War and there has been a continuous race for effective ness between explosives, guns, and defense works. Although these stronger explosives were discovered * In the nineteenth century, it has only been recently that they have been put to the greatest effectiveness. There are several well-known ex. plosives used in ammunition, and though all are based on the same principles, no two armies use exactly the same formula. Lyddite, cordite, melinite, and maximite are among the most powerful used, and so keen the desire among nations to possess the most deadly destroyer, constant improvements are being made and fresh discoveries announced. All shells of more than one pound in weight fired from big guns are explosives. Usually the explosives are equipped with a time fuse which sets the time for the shell to burst and scatter its shrapnel. But, there must be something back of all this to carry a shell, some of which weigh a ton or more, and this is nothing more than a chemical compound. Nitroglycerine has been found to be the stronger of any explosives discovered. It is used in the preparation of other less violent explosives. After the two acids, sulfuric and nitric, have been mixed In a four-to-one proportion, the nitroglycerine crystallizes out when the aeids our poured into water. It is a light, yellow, or colorless, only fluid almost insoluble in water, sweet to the taste and very poisonous. It is not easily set afire, but burns with a greenish flame, and when heated to 180 degrees, decomposes with explosive violence. It may he exploded by a severe jar, but is easiest set off with a detonator containing fulminate of mercury. The cause of the great force exerted by the explosion is the fact that the volume of gas liberated is about 10,000 times the volume of the nitroglycerine. This exerts an explosive force thirteen times as great as that of gunpowder. It is never used alone because of iis dangerous ' I'xplosivi Qualities,, but it is mixed with clay to make dynamite, or soaked in cotton to make guncotton for the manufacture of the ammunition of the larger guns. Note: I guarantee no experiments on the above to work in class laboratory. The Cemetery Poet Here lies a chemist named Auricular, When the flask blew up he walked perpendicular. Here lies the carcass of Doctor Lee Who mixed up I with NH-3, Where he's gone or how he fares Nobody knows and nobody cares. Here I lie and no wonder I'm dead For I sweetened my coffee with sugar of lead. —Reprinted from The Catalyst. Did you know that 'Orthoethoxana- monebenzoylamidochin Line" is C-18 H-16 N-2 02? STEVENS ADVISES— (Continued from Page 1] court procedure. All laws concerning crime should aim to punish the offender as quickly as possible, teach.him a lesson, and deter others who are wavering toward crime, according to the district attorney. Concerning the law's delay Mr. Stevens said that the criminal, the bootlegger, and al! law violators are In reality spoiled children who have been spared the rod from childhood. They seem to believe that, even with indictment, there will be delay, a puny bond, and possibly a suspended sentence. Under our present system the criminal does not fear quick and certain punishment. "In Houston alone It costs the county over 110,000 annually for grand jury salaries, and after a man is arrested it takes about two weeks to get him indicted. If a grand jury refuses to indict, it is impossible to prosecute, however guilty the offender may be." Examples of right law enforcement were given by Mr. Stevens who cited Wisconsin's law which is so efficient that criminals dodge the cities In that state. Faults of the jury system were described by Mr. Stevens as follows: "The jury system of Texas is wholly defective in that two men equally guilty of the same offense may be given unequal sentences, and it frequently happens that a confirmed crook will receive less punishment than a first offender. It Is not the fault of the juries, for they must grope in the dark, so to speak, in order to determine the degree of punishment. It would be far better for the judge instead of the jury to fix punishment, leaving the Jury the sole duty of deciding the guilt or innocence of the defendant." In closing, Mr. Stevens said: "A change is needed in Texas, more elastic penalties, which would permit the judge at his own discretion to Impose a fine, jail sentence, or a penitentiary sentence, according to the nature of the crime and the character of the defendant." ihr LoueQetuVieoaus There's that nice Firman Sykes. I'd ike to meet him'but, as I understand t, 'twould do me no good. Have you ever noticed Loula Mae Smith's hair? I know you have. It's gorgeous. And, flashing an adorable grin, comes Nelda Smith, bringing up the rear—I mean, following in succession: There's Helen* Davis. She's right "itty", huh? — Speaking of blondes, have you noticed Helen Higgins in the office? I naturally love her smile. Howdy, Richard. A. Macfee, and a nice one at that. I like him! There's Fay Gene Lawrence with Martin Lowe, her escort, body-guard, or what-bave-you! Suppose I'd better hurry. These teachers and their requirements! Gonna get me down yet! Toodle-loo, darlings— CUTIE. Student.: "Mr, Miller, if a fellow'! ambitious he has a lot of ambition doesn't he?" Mr. Miller: "Certainly, aren't yon ambitious?" Student: "Well, no, sir, I think I'm sort of bilious." Lillian L.: You have the advantage of me when we go around together. Fulton R.: How so? Lillian L.: You're In better company than I am. JR. COLLEGE HEADS— (Continued from Page 1) Mr. Richard G. Cox of Gulf Park College, Gulf Park, Mississippi, was elected president of the Association. Mr. Jeremiah B. Lillard, president of the Sacramento Junior College, Is the retiring president. Nicholas Ricciardvof the California Division of Secondary Schools, made this statement: "In its future development, the junior college is going to render service better suited to the needs of that large group of young people planning to enter the occupations which are classified between the skilled and professional levels and are designated he semi-professional vocations. In rendering such service the junior col- will more and more receive sympathetic and understanding cooperation from Ihe institutions of higher learning and from lay leaders." SCHOOL BOOKS AND SUPPLIES Fountain Pens and Pencils— The Latest Books, Stationery and Gifts—Visit Our Lending PILLOTS 1014 TEXAS AVENUE OLpt>«r y idutati'ct St\jnt lyS that thil bad after a FRESHMAN BALL— (Continued from Page 1) pointed chairman of the social committee. Assisting her are R. G. Hall, Homer Lowe, Gladys Jacobs, and Christine Fitzgerald. The "Cougar Collegians" are doing their important bit to help. Bids have sold fast, and the ball promises to be one of the most successful social affairs in the history of Junior College. Sophomores have lent a helping hand by buying bids. Professor H. W. Harris, sponsor of the Freshman class, declared that the dance would be postponed unless $200 were sight. It is probably an assured fact already. Officers of the Freshman class ar< as follows: Warren Lemmon, presi. dent; Anna Sloan, vice-president: Gladys Jacobs, secretary; Hennie Hawkins, treasurer. "Where Quality, Service and Experience Count" BILAO'S SHOE SHOP Special Attention Paid to Ladies' Shoes A TRIAL IS ALL I ASK PHONE PRESTON 7910 1108 Capitol Avenue MAGAZINES- (Continued from Page 1) New York Times Magazine) Normal Instructor and Primary Plans Pan American Political Science Quarterly ' P.-T. A. Messenger Radio News Review o£ Reviews Scribner's Magazine Scientific Monthly Social Service Review Teacher's College Record United States Dally ALMEDA PHARMACY One block East of Junior College "Let's Get Acquainted" Holman and LaBranch H. 8194 Managed by an HJ.C. Student 'Bring in the Lid9 HOUSTON HAT CO. 1121 MAiN STREET WOOD & PURDY SPORTING GOODS COMPANY Athletic Outfitters Felt Emblems and Pennants Made to Order Hunting and Fishing Supplies Phone- Capitol 2G13 1317 Capitol Avenue School Supplies Printing—Lithographing Engraving—Embossing Office Supplies STANDARD Printing & Litho. Co. Phone Preston 3848 1207-1211 CAPITOL AVENUE (Opposite Post Office) POST OFFICE PHARMACY 1124 Capitol Avenue Phones: Fairfax 1480-3820-6783 LIGHT LUNCHES — SPECIAL TOASTED SANDWICHES CHILI AND TAMALES Prompt, Efficient Service to Students ^gakowitzjfeoj CORRECT CLOTHES FOR YOUNG MEN
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