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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931 - File 002. January 14, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/89/show/86.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 14, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/89/show/86

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931 - File 002, January 14, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/89/show/86.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 7, January 14, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 7, January 14, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date January 14, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR The Cougar Of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscription, $1.00 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Edltor-in-Chlei Everett Fondall Assistant Editor . .Kenneth Phillips Assistant Editor.... Dorothy McGraw Faculty Advisor F, R. Birney Department Editors Society Maurine Edminster Sports—Men.. Sports—Women, Humor Activity. Exchange Feature George Hughes . . .Maurine Keach Jane Wltherspoon . Frances Baty . .. .Rubye Tunnel] Ethel Mercer Chapell Freeman Beatrice Hamilton Lois Harrison Hertford Inman A, C. Irwin Fay Laurence Ethel Mercer Rubye Tunnell Llewellyn Ross Pauline Ault Frances Baty Opal Beane Lucille Cafcalas Evelyn Cochran Welton Cohen Gordon Davis Ruth Dermody Lois Duff An Innovation Whei Fred R. Birney, Journalism instructor at Junior College, invited several professional newspaper men to speak betore his classes, he started something. Judging from the approval that met the idea, he must have started something good. A number of the faculty, when lib terviewed on (heir opinion ct having visitors to the classroom, expressed their entire approval. Coach Archie W. French voiced, one condition, however, and that was that the speaSei stick to generalities. The technique on which his boys build their plays is kacred to Coach French, stated emphatically that he wouldn't "want another coach breaking in on it. His opinion is that from his close contact with his hoys, he knows tin strength and weakness better than outsider. Of course the psychology of the gridiron would naturally differ from that oE the classroom and while some of the faculty feel a faint uneasiness that Junior College students are still too impressionable, others feel that they are quite as capable of assimilating foreign ideas as older students are. While some of the Journalism students were a little frightened at the glimpse of newspaper life revealed by the reporters and editors who talked to them, others were strengthened in their determination to make good in the game. Because they are really interested in this type of work they accepted the distasteful facts along with those that make it so alluring. Looking these facts in the face now will make it easier for them when they come in contact with facts in the future. W. H. Miner, history instructor, tried early in the term to persuade 8. G. McCann of Rice Institute to speak to the Junior College history students, but Mr. McCann begged off. Since that time Mr. Miner has had a very full program and there has been no opportunity to Invite other speakers. Mr. Miner stated, however, that he intends to give a lecture to his classes on China, when the spring term begins. Instructors of the romance languages all agree that an occasional speaker who has personal experiences to relate of the lands and customs being studied, tends to increase Interest. Though few speakers are able to use the language which they teach fluently enough for the class to follow, they,are able to contribute to the students' fund of information. Mrs. Floy 1'. Soule. who teaches both Spanish and French, declares that she has not yet had visitors to the class because of lack of time. The language classes are held only on Tuesday and Thursday, and the whole class period must oe devoted to the regular work. H W. Harris, in addition to teaching English and public speaking at Junior College, Isalso director of the Oratjorical Association. In this capacity, he Is favorable to the plan of introducing speakers to the club. Mr. Harris says the facts of everyday life Bhould be brought before the students In the classroom, but (these facts should be presented accurately and care should be used In the selection of the person who Is to speak. The Munching Army Milton Gregory, goaded to desperation, has written the following formula to rid the halls oE perambulating human eonfeetionaries. His recipe: Have you ever noticed, while dashing madly from class to class, some of the walking confectioneries who parade through the halls of H. J. Some of our dear fellow students, it seems, carry enough gum, candy, and perhaps even popcorn, to start a string of chain stores. It is highly noticeable that the< who always carry the largest stocks of nicknacks always carry the fewest books, yet they seem to know more about everything in general than those who look like circulating libraries, with three Drier cases under each arm and four books sticking out of each pocket. Why Is all this gum chewing necessary? We believe there is only one possible solution which will abolish it forever. By threatening anyone with instant death when caught with gum, and carrying a few threats into executions, those habitual gum chew- ers will be scarcer than bathing suits at the North Pole. Want Glazed Paper? Then Sell Advertising Want glazed paper? Kenneth Phillips, who knows how to sell advertising, has this to say about the demand for glazed paper for the Cougar. Recently I noticed a demand for glazed paper for the "Cougar" with a growing list of names beneath It. I tried to stop its circulation. "Cougar" funds are running low; yet Mr. Birney has announced that he will use glazed paper If the students will be satisfied with one less issue. News stock is $E per Issue cheaper, lasts longer, and ranks higher in contests. Let me suggest that the ones who started the demand for glazed paper spend some time in securing ads for the "Cougar" and collecting bills for these ads. Literary Forum Miss Wltherspoon III Miss Jane Witherspoon, a sophomore student at H. J. C„ has been absent during the opening week of the new year because of illness. During the holidays a small cut on her face became Infected. The ailment became so severe that Miss Witherspoon was obliged to remain at home and receive medical treatment for the Latest reports were that 1 Wltherspoon's condition is much proved and she hopes to return to school soon. SCRAPS From Here and There The high cost of living isn't so bad if you don't have to pay for it. Procrastination is the art of , keeping up with yesterday. I can't see any sense in going through life trying to balance a bunch of illusions on your nose; they come down and hit you in the eye. Men seldom make passes to girls who wear glasses, A lie is an abomination unto the Lord and a present help in the time of trouble. An optimist is a, guy that has never had much experience. There is one a man's life that he never forgets; and that woman, worse luck, is rarely his wife. Did you know that we had a genius in our midst? One look at the following work of art is enough to make the Old Masters themselves stand up and bow. Great work, Everett! MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB (With Variations) Up-to-Date Version Mary had a little lamb. And off to school they flew; But now she has no little lamb, Her Prof likes mutton ste?>. With Christopher Marlowe's Mighty Line Lead wench! Follow lamb! Follow! Curse thy fill! Follow . . . curse - . ■ and die! BARRELS of FUN Small boy (looking at names on lining of Warren Lemmon's Freshman cap): "Gee! You have too many sweethearts at Junior College." In Professor Harris' English 213 class: Mr. Harris—"Well, I guess I'd better not bring up any family history today. My wife is visiting the Milton Moffitt {interrupting Mr. Schuhman's lecture): "May I speak to Carlton Thompson?" Mr. Schuhman: "Yes, of course,' Milton (looking around): "I don't see him!" Mr. Schuhman: "Oh, no! He's in here." Brooks Davis: "Where did you get the blinkers, James?" James Morris: "Well, you see, was riding on a train. Suddenly came to a tunnel, and the daylight faded out. Before I knew it, my arms reached out. Then my lights went out." Mr. Harris: I wonder if the modern producers will be able to revive Shakespeare? Joe Cain: Was he at the party, too? Mrs. Miner—What lovely, fleecy clouds! I'd just like to be up there sitting on one of them. Mr. Miner—All right. You drive the '31—wishes to gosh the women wouldn't hang around him so much. '30—wishes he knew what he's going to do with the one he's acquired ; of wishing for it. —Zip'n Tang. As Chaucer Would Have Written It Whan that Marille hadde yonge etao. shrdlu(l) It's phxurt (2) weren whittes snieu Eek straunge strondes Marrille yTonne (3) That etaoshrdlu everichon goon (4), Footnotes: (3) You gues (1) Lamb, (2) , (4) I dunno! Fleece, If these views, as expressed by the college faculty, are taken into consideration in preparing class schedules, Junior College students tan prepare themselves for a series ot lectures. The lack of time is a great obstacle in carrying out this method of Instruction, but no doubt this can be overcome in some way. Cougar Resolutions Prospects are bright for a better Cougar than ever with the arrival of the new year. During the year Just closed the H. J. C. publication was liberally patronized by Houston advertisers, for which we are thankful, and we feel that this advertising gave full value to our advertisers, due to the loyal support of our student body. We, the staff, have tried and shall try harder than ever to see that the Cougar reflects every constructive phase of our college life; that our literary page is the best effort of our writers; and that our "straight news" stories tell to the outside world as well as the world of our student body the wonderful things that are being accomplished at Houston Junior College. As Shakespeare'd Handle It Enter Maria, followed by Malvolio, the lamb— Maria (sings): Come away, come away lamb, I prithee, come away, With a hey and a ho And a hey nonio, For I your true love amb. Served Up In Junior College Style Mary had a wad of gum, The Lennox girl, you know, And everywhere that Mary went The gum was sure to go. It followed her to school one day, Which was against the rule, The teacher took that gum away And chewed it after school. —By Everett H. Kendall. The Collegiate Psalm Ethel Mercer, one of our students in the journalism department, gives her idea of a modern and collegiate Psalm of Life, . . and what a clever psalm it is ... ! Tell me not in doleful numbers That school life is the bunk, Rise up from thoughtless slumbers, Show the world you've got some spunk. Let us go to work in earnest, We can make things hit on high; Be a leader, not a follower, Make your motto "Do or die." Now's the time to do your boosting, Do not wait tomorrow's dawn, Begin at once to do your rooting Before your chance is gone. Our old College Is a pippin And we ought to boost it big; When we hear some growler yippin We should biff him on the wig. HIS SOUL WAS IN IT Bertie: That new salesman was certainly fired with enthusiasm. Myldred: You bet—I never saw the boss discharge anybody quite so violently. Mr. Birney (to humor editor): In preparing your Joke column it will be necessary for you to separate the cheap from the goat getters. Mr. Vanzee: It is safe to say that civilization will continue for at least fifty centuries. Harvey Richards: Oh, yeah! When will it start? Judge—Were you sober at the time this accident occurred? Wayne Livergood—As sober as a judge, your Honor. Judge—Six months. Angus—If you've fouud such a valuable ring the law requires that you advertise for the owner. Sandy—Ay mon, and which newspaper has the smallest circulation? Suffering Sambo Sambo, a Southern darkey, married Liza. In about two weeks he c to the reverend gentleman who had tied the knot, looking as if he had lost his last friend in the world. "What's the matter, Sambo; aren't you happy?" th preacher inquired. "No, suh, pahson. Ah wants a di- "I'm sorry to hear that, Sambo, but you must remember that you took Liza for better or worse." "Ah knows dat, pahson, but she': wuss dan ah took her fo'." Sunday School teacher: So Lot's wife looked back and turned into a pillar of salt. Jo Ed Winfree—How long had she been driving? Jane Witherspoon—I've been asked to get married lots of times. Warren Lemmon—Who asked you? Jane—Mother and father. Smile! It will increase your efficiency. Stop chewing gum and save energy. "Yes, I used to shoot tigers in AErica," said Bill Jeter. But there are no tigers in Africa," said Prof. Miller. "Certainly not, I shot them all." To Freshmen: Read much, but think more, if possible. 'How long has Mr. Vanzee been married?" For twenty awed years." "Are you going to smoke that pipe?" "No, I only have one match." —Notre Dame Juggler. IRONY '33—wishes he knew women like a senior. '32—wishes he had kept track of all the women he has dated. ( Ned: I can't give you anything Sue: Well, hurry up, let's have it. —-Missouri Outlaw. "This is food for reflection," said the billygoat as he ate the looking glass. —Carolina Buccaneer. "Why doesnt' tl to school any mo "What! At 50 r > lamb rollow you :, Mary?" lies an hour?" —Temple Owl. SOPHS HELP FRESHMEN BALL Cheer up,--there's really nothing to bawl about. As Percy Forman says: "This is like a dog's tail, because It's bound to occur; it's not like a cat's tail, because it won't he fur to the end."— That's all. MACK NABS THE BALL By Welton Cohen Gooch McNab was dumb, plain dumb. He was the fall guy, and was blamed with every bit oe mischief that happened in the entire college. He was reprimanded by the dean for more things he had never done, and punished for more faults not his own, than any other six men at the school. And he suffered them all without a murmur—he did not even have sense enough to deny his guilt. He had been campused so long that he had forgotten what the interior of the drug store aeross the wav looked like. But one thing h,e did know, and that was that Angelina Warren was the nicest, the prettiest, me most lovable girl in Rah-Rah College. He followed her around like the hem of her skirt, and suffered untold misery at her constant rebuffs. At night he would sit beneath her dormitory window until she came in from a date, and then croon some silly ballad about "Angel face." And he would continue to croon, until the entire dormitory was awake and throwing everything possible at him. They would even throw their lipsticks at him, and lipsticks are precious objects to the co-ed. The only girl to get any sleep, was Angelina. The noise outside did not disturb her, for she was dreaming blissfully of Roger Buckley, football star and one of the most popular men on the campus. Everyone called her angel, and the name fitted her appearance perfectly, but who can say how much oE the devil there was in her? One day Oooch had been shadowing her more than usual. He made her nervous. Suddenly she turned on him and cried: "Go away, scat!" And in plain English that means—"get gone." "Aw, now, -Angel," he pleaded, "I know why you don't like me. It's because I'm not a football man like Roger Buckley. Weil, 111 show you; I'll make the team. And he carried out his threat, he actually made the team. How, no one knew, but he was on the bench in the big deciding game with Kazz-Bury University. It was one of the most difficult games that Rah-Rah College had ever played, and in the last quarter the score was still 0 to 0 in favor of Razz-Bury. In utter desperation the coach sent Gooch in to play the few remaining minutes. And how Gooch did strut out to the center of the field to where the players were taking time out. He was determined to be the star of the game and win the fair Angelina. The game was on! Rah-Rah was yelling for a touchdown. The men played like fury. It was Kah-Rah'a ball, but Razz-Bury's line could not be broken. Signals—36-84-69-73 hump! Suddenly, for no reason at all, Gooch received a forward pass. He ha4 a clear field before him with only 20 yards to go. Rah-Rah's cheering squad went wild. "Run," they cried, "run, yoi| darned fool, run!" Did Gooch run? You get he did. glanced around him, and running over to the coach, yelled: "What do I do with it now?"
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