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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933 - File 002. January 25, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/74/show/71.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 25, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/74/show/71

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933 - File 002, January 25, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/74/show/71.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 6, January 25, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 6, January 25, 1933
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date January 25, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript PAGE TWO THE COUGAR THE COUGAR Editor Associate Editor _ Assistant Editor .. Managing Editor . Faculty Advisor .. ..James Julian - L. P. Marshall ...Hope McCutcheon A. Marks ...Frederick Birney Departmental Feature Editors Elmer Hamilton, C. W. Skipper Sports Editor - — Milton Gregory Exchange Editor Frances Nesmith Humor Editor Bob Stallings Business Manager Advertising Manager ..Minnie Topek -Kitty Hurlock Reporters Ovide Boulet, Harry Flavin, Elizabeth King, Cortis Lawrence, Tom- mie Cooksey, Jesse Darling, Jill Jenkins, and Isabel McDaniel. STUDENT ASSOCIATION DANCES The Student Association dance scheduled for Friday night has paved the way for bigger and better Junior College dances—dances where everyone will feel that it is really their dance—dances where the alumni will be as welcome as the active student body itself. The Student Association representatives have been asked innumerable times, "When are we going to have a dance?" If everyone who has asked such a question will attend this dance at the University Club, we feel sure that they will be repaid for their trouble and will help to make the dance a success. To that group of people who are continually complaining about our lack of spirit, we say, "Here is your chance to show that you have a spirit of loyalty yourself." If they fail to turn out for this dance, then it's up to them to keep quiet about social activities. Our dances will be only what we make them. The Student Association has done its part. The rest is up to me students themselves. Are we going to make this dance go over as it should and as we are capable of doing, or will we allow it to fai as we have done so many times in the past? Think it over! It's en tirely up to us! THAT NEW ORGANIZATION With the beginning of a new term next month, a new organization will take its place as one of the regular activities of the Houston Junior College. We are referring to that new 'Men's club' you have heard so much about, and seen so little of. To date the club has chosen a name, elected officers and held three meetings. Harvey W. Harris is sponsor, and as his democratic school spirit is well known over the entire campus, there is no question about his merit as a leader. The club has the entire sanction and support oi Dean Dupre and the faculty. Made up of fifteen charter members, and limiting its entire membership to twenty-eight, with a membership requirement that all prospective members have a scholastic average of at least "C", there can be no question as to the calibre of those gaining admission. The purpose of the club is to establish a better relationship be tween faculty and student body, to promote interest in the college activities, and to formulate standards of ethics and fellowship among its members. . . . Give it your wholehearted support and cooperation. It will set a precedent in the institution. OUR DUTY At the beginning of each new term, the officials of the Junior College are faced with the problem of increasing the size of the student body by advertising the school to the people of Houston and South Texas. We feel that the student body can greatly assist in the present campaign for new students by explaining the merits of the Junior College to their friends and prospective college students. The best recommendation any college can have lies in the satisfaction and pride of its students for their school. In this respect the Junior College can hold its own with any other college in the country, for who can say that we are not proud to attend this institution? In order for H. J. C. to continue to grow it is necessary to add new students to its rolls. We should feel that it is our duty to show people the advantages of our college and convince them that they should attend themselves. By increasing our student body we will be ablq to have more school activities, larger classes, and greater athletic activity. All of these qualities are to be desired, but they come only witb a large and active student body. In future years we will be able to look back on our days in the Junior College and see where we helped to make the school successful and how we aided in bringing about the University of Houston. PH0MEYjj)% Professor Z. Q. Whizboum, Archaeologist, American Museum of Natural History, New York City. Dear Professor: As per your orders, we have been digging for six months in Pyramid No. 14%, three miles north of camel trail A, near Cairo. Undoubtedly, this was the resting place of that great little vamp, Queen Aphrexompuptolx, otherwise known as Cleopatra, the man- hater. All we have been able to find far, after digging through fifty feet cf solid rock, is four bunches of love letters, all tied with pink ribbons, most of them with Roman postage stamps, and postmarked from August 14, 3 a.m. 56 B.C. to July 4, 49 B.C. Had these letters been found two thousand years earlier, it would have caused a national scandal. We are quoting below from some of the letters, and sending all of them to you by the next air mail, which leaves five months and two minutes from today. Quote: Most beautiful Cleopatra: I almoet didn't get away the last time I cams to see you, because 300 Roman soldiers tried to capture me as I came out the door. It took fast work my part to kill 132 of them with my dagger, and the rest ol them caught air. Can't I meet you some- te beside in the palace? If old Julius knew that I have been coming to see you every Saturday night, he would beat the (Dear Prof, the papy- was undecipherable at this place) out of me. I am bringing over my fleet of nine galleys, so we can go canoe riding nsxt week when the moon is full. yours, Pompey. Here's the last one, Professor: Dear Miss Cleopatra: We have submitted the architect's drawing to the contractor, and he says that a pyramid, built to government specifications, can be finished in 14 years, and will cost only 40,000 black slaves, $100.. in gold, seven camels and 4 cases of pre-war Mesopotamian fire water. May w^ enter your order for one of our finest pyramids? Great International Egypt and Algiers Contracting Co. P. S. Dear Prof.: Please don't forget our expense money—and wish us good luck on our excavating. Yours truly, Digging Deep. Shorts and Spats Mr. Kerbow's education certainly ruined a good farmer. Ask anybody who had a weak imag- nastiion, how Mr. Birney looked in riding clothes. Don't stop me," gasped the boy running from the group of dull debutants, "I'm a fugitive from a Jane Gang." We received information that the school board doesn't need Mr. Rees any longer. He's long enough now. Mr. Rote would be in b bad fix if he had a sensitive sense of smell. "'Shorty" Wilke said that she was out skating. I'll bet the boy friend ■an out of gas and she wouldn't lend lim her skates. Mr. Dupre can put one over on the doctors at least. They can't tell him to have his teeth taken out. What would Mr. Hooker look like in some very baggy nickers? The radio announcer professor repeated the pronoun "I" 75 times in one hour. If some one would only put a cross «rk on that patch that "Shorty" Sparks had on her face recently. All those who want a group photo of Lucy G. please form a line on the left or any other place. I went through a boy friends mail the other day I found this in a letter addressed to Alma Stewart who had a birthday yesterday. EXCHANGE The past week has brought us sev- al exchange papers from different parts of the state and from points outside of Texas. "The Tiger" a weekly news magazine published by members of the student body of Colorado College, Colorado Springs, Colorado, is a very nifty number and immediately attract! attention. seems that Colorado College fairly reeks with clever column writers. Why do all of the schools get all of the breaks? Whats that screaming—? Its the editor. Hit him with this club. Students of Colorado College go in for fraternities and sororities in a big w«y. From Iraan, Texas, comes the "Broadcaster," breadcasting Iraan school news. This paper is published in a convenient size, one that will enable you to read it anywhere behind text books, in a crowded bus or wherever you take the notion. This paper was given the third highest rating for a class B paper in the recent Texas High School Press Associaton contest. It is needless for me to offer my lowly criticisms of so good a paper. "The Dial," from San Antonio, issued twice each month by students of Westmoreland College in San Antonio. Apparently students in Westmoreland despise dishonesty in any form. In a recent questionnaire submitted to the students, asking for the worst possible fault of a student—cheating, dishonesty, lying and stealing lead the list Some day, boys and girls, one of those students will be president of these United States. "The Dial's" reading public is evidently proud of the diary type of columns, imitating the immortal Pepy's, you know. Students at Hillsboro Junior College, i Hillsboro, Texas, call this paper "The Chieftan." One especially good column "I only Heard," appears as if it might keep the authof of it busy—as busy, maybe, as Mahatma Ghandi In a wind storm. An excerpt from their paper follows: WANT ADS Wanted—Some invention to keep me from snappng my fingers in French's governmental class.—Jessie Darling. Will Swap — Twelve pairs of long handles for one good suit of shorts, suitable for P.-T. wear—Donald Aitken. Call S-C-O-T-C-H, 120. Wanted—Information concerning Elmer Hamilton. Last seen, at my house Friday night. Loretta Eslinger. From Baylor University comes the "Daily Clariot," a small paper and quite intellectually inclined. There is only one objection, the front page make up is chopped up. This paper also lacks humor. Maybe they don't go in for columns and features like we do. But I managed to find a short joke among its few pages—one that goes something like this: "Last night Mack Douglas was late of psychology class. Kerbow called out his name and then said, "Miss Kendrick, perhaps you can tell ua where Mr. Douglas is. I believe I saw you with him last night." Everyone laughed, Miss Kendrick blushed, and in walked Mack—they laughed again. What a life!" From San Antonio comes "El Na- pal," published by students of Sidney Lanier Junior-Senior High School, in Sen Antonio. Most of the members of the staff are Mexican and they take a great interest in theri excellent little paper. Students of their school are conduct- ing an English speaking contest. Each member has to sign a pledge to use only English at school. From their "Just For Fun" column comes the following: "The gum chewing girl and the cud chewing cow. Are somewhat alike, but different somehow; What is the difference? Oh, I see it now! Tis the thoughtful expression on the face of the cow!" Stop Me If You've Heard This One By Milton Gregory Picked up at random; Things are tightening up all along the line. Richard Barthlemess, we have read has taken a 33 1-3 percent pay Barthlemess used to make two pictures a year and get $150,000 for * each. This year he is going to make three pictures, and get only $100,000 for each. It's the white-collar fel- * lows like that who have our sympathy —the fellows who have to do more work in order to live at all. » Mammals You ought to know — attention future biologists. The Polar bear has a very low freezing point. His favorite seat is a cake of ice and though he never has chiliblains he has crazy spells. Polar Bears live mostly upon Seals. It is a good thing to keep out of the Arctic if you look like * a Seal. Polar Bears mature much later than animals near the Equator. Some polar bears live so far North that they never mature. The best ones are mad* into rugs for people to trip over. Some polar bears do not wish * to be rugs. They never amount to much. Tigers are very beautiful, but when " they are bad they are horrid. They commit rapine and pillage and have two or more cubs at a time. Tigers seldom climb trees, but don't count on that. The Man-Eating Tiger is old and decrepit He has lost his strength f and vigor and we should feel sorry for him. Young normal tigers do not eat people. If eaten by a tiger you may * rest assured that he was abnormal. Read this sentence: Federal fuses are the result of years of scientific study combined with the experience of years. How mony F's are there in that , Sentence? Count them only once — don't go back and count them again. A real fish story: Jack Bryant, of Dry Fork, Virginia, and his pa started * down to the creek to go fishing. They arrived at the creek and discovered they had no bait. They saw an old Water moccasin lying beside a log with a frog in his mouth. Mr. Moccasin had a happy look on his face and was just ready to swallow the frog. Jack took a forked stick, clamped it over « the snake's head, and took the frog away to use it for bait. The old watsr moccasin had such a sad look on his face at having the frog taken right out of his mouth, that the two fishermen were sorry for him. So they gave the reptile a drink of old white oak moonshine — and that's , noonshine what is. The moccasin went wriggling away, and Jack and his pa cut up the frog and began to fish. In a few minutes they heard a strange - thumping sound, and looking down, they saw that some water moccasin looking up at them with another frog in his mouth. A monkey sits on top of a pole, and a man walks around the pole in a 4 circle for the purpose, let us say, of taking a good look at his ancestor. As the man moves on his chosen path the monkey turns on top of the pole so . as to always keep his face to the man. The question is, when the man has gone completely round the pole has _ he or has he not gone round the monkey? A railroad train had a crew of three, and three passengers, traveling be- « tween Chicago and New York. The train crew is made up of an engineer, fireman and a guard. Their names are Smith, Jones and Robinson, but not necessarily in that order. The pas- % sengers arr- Smith, Jones and Robinson, but will be referred to as Mr. Smith, Mr. Jones, etc. Mr. Robinson lives in New York. Mr. • Jones' annual salary is $5000. The guard lives halfway between New York and Chicago, and his namesake among the passengers lives in Chicago.* The guards closest neighbor is one of the passengers and his annual salary is exactly three times that of the guard. ^ Smith beat the fireman at billiards. The problem is: What is the name of the engineer?
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