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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 11, April 26, 1933
File 004
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 11, April 26, 1933 - File 004. April 26, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/69/show/68.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 26, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 11, April 26, 1933 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/69/show/68

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 11, April 26, 1933 - File 004, April 26, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/69/show/68.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 11, April 26, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 11, April 26, 1933
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date April 26, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript THE COUGAR HUMOR Libbye Lewis—No, Sir, I'm saving i Heroine (despairingly) "Is there my kisses. no succor?" Richard Long—I'd like to add to] Red Coulson: "Hell yes, there is. I your collection, dear. paid two bucks to see this show. John R.: Well, my father has an< other wife to support now. Toosy: How's that? He's a bigamist. John: No, but I just married. Senior: When you sleep your noble brow reminds me of a story. Junior: What story? Sleeping Beauty? Senior: No, Sleepy Hollow. Here's to the girl who steals, lies, and swears—steals into your arms, lies there, and swears she'll never love another. Three's a Crowd My roommate says there are some things a girl should not do before twenty. Well, personally, I don't enjoy a large audience either. "Pa, what are ancestors?" asked Billy Minto. "Well, my son I am one of yours. Your Grandpa is another." "Oh, then why is it people brag about them?" An old lady, after waiting in a confectionery store about ten minutes, grew grossly impatient at the lack of service. Finally she rapped sharply on the counter—"Here, young lady," she cried, "who waits on the nuts?" Professor: "Do you know what happened in 1776?" Freshie: "Gosh, no. 1 can't remember what happened last night." The first time a boy steals a kiss from a girl, she is shocked; the second time, she is offended; the third time she is doubtful; and the fourth time she is waiting. First Tramp: "What's worrying you today, Herbert?" Second Tramp: "I found a receipe for home-made beer, and I have no home." And then there is the dumb frosh Kitty who packed her valise when her boy friend asked her to go to "Grand Hotel" with him, Foley: "Is your horse going to race in the Derby?" Melcher: "They won't let him; he got scratched in the Preakness, Foley (quick like): "Sure nuff. And that's such a tender place, too, ich Hey, you boob, how do you expect us to see the game up here? Sit down in front. Stillman Taylor: Can't do it, buddy. I ain't built that way. Evelyn Cochran: How many ribs have you Lillian? Lil Schwartz: I don't know, I'm so awful ticklish I never could count "Robert," asked Miss Batte, "why were you late this morning?" Robert Kelso: "Well, I had to feed the chickens, the clock was slow, the cook was late, and the car got off of the track." "What else?" "My goodness," replied Robert, "ain't that enough." What would happen if some of the most common advertising slogans became mixed: ONYX HOSIERY—"Best in the long run." OTIS ELEVATORS—"Good to the last drop." KLAXTON—"His master's voice." FORD—"I walk a mile for a Camel." FATIMA—"I'se in town honey." IVORY SOAP—"There's a reason." LISTERINE—"What a whale of a difference just a few cents make." PALM OLIVE—"Forty-four years without loss to an investor." B. V. D.—"Ask the man who owns one." Receipe for Success Find out where the money is and get there as quickly as you can and when you get there get all you can get there and then get out of there with all you could get out of those that are there before those that are there get out of you all that you got there after you got there. Our cow has the hiccoughs and churns her own milk. Max Cohen: My ancesters came over in the Mayflower. Tommie Cooksey: It's mighty lucky for you they did. The immigration laws are much stricter Bill Stiles: Did you tell her when you proposed that you weren't srthy of her? That always makes good impression. Hugo Loeders: Well, I was going to but she told me so first. . C. Dunlap: What do we mean when we say the whole is greater than any of its parts? Mary Bradley Tuma: A restaurant doughnut, Mae Golkei Who was the King of France during the Revolution? Daisy Lee Golke: Louis the Thirteenth—no, the Fifteenth no, the well, anyhow, he was in his tens. Mesta Waggoner: Why have they let all the monkeys out of their cages? Zoo Attendant: Holiday, M This is Darwin's birthday. Reception— Continued from page 1 ties, etc., and to furnish publicity of all kinds, before and after. Entertainment Committee Committee o n Entertainment: French, chairman; Harris, Bishkin, Rees, Ledlow, and Schuhmann. Floor wax, orchestra, dance regulations, piano, voting and chairs, lighting of court, and the floor com- ittee will be furnished by the Cdm- ittee on Entertainment. Door Committee Door Committee: Schuhmann, chairman; Kerbow, Rees, Miller, Henderson, Ledlow, Hooker, Birney, and Fields. The door Committee will be expected to enforce admission regulations throughout the evening. Follow-up Committee Follow-up Committee: Hooker, chairman; French, Ebaugh, Bender, and Miller. The duties of the Follow-up Committee will be to se that all decorations are taken down and cleared away, and to return borrowed articles. Student Committee Student Committee: Brinkley, Aitken, Gray, Black, Steeger, Cochran, Nesmith, and Julian. The Student Committee will have ! duties the assisting of faculty members as needed. Work on the committees will be started immediately. Frosh Say Barn Dance Is Success Sponsoring a Barn Dance at Kensington Hall on Thursday, April 20, the Freshman Class of Houston Junior College announce the closing of their social activities, Rui MacBride sang with the Buccaneers orches- which provided music from 10 till 2. Kensington Hall was fittingly decorated by a committee composed of Bill Jones, Ben Young, Max Cohen, and Christine Flanagan. This Barn Dance, last of the Junior College sponsored dances open to the public, answered the college's desire for a costume party. "So many of the students wanted an excuse to look funny and feel foolish that we decided to give this chance," said Harry Gray, class president. It is hoped that Mrs. Ebaugh and other members of the faculty who attend, will appear in costume. Many students say they wish to see their instructors in working clothes, just change. Glee Club Offers Singing Minstrel The Boys' Glee Club presented a mistrel show Monday, April 24, at :30 p. m. in the auditorium of the Houston Junior College. The soloists were N. C. Jenson, who will sing "01' Mah River;" John ib, Interlocuter, "I Play Fiddle for the Czar;" Edgar Nirkin, Bari- : Solo; Hugh Asbury, solo dance; Carnes Weaver, banjo solo; Harry Gray, Octurina solo; Alfred Butler, Memories;" Edgar Nirken and Alfred Butler will be "end men." he club is composed of eighteen 5. The officers are: Orlo McGeath, president, Alfred Butler, secretary and treasurer; and Louis Ruckert has charge of the music. It was organized at the beginning of January 1933. According to Mrs. Bogard, their director, "the club is doing unusually fine work when you consider that they meet only one r each week—Wednesday from 7 to 8." Girls Plan— Continued from page 1 identity of these cloth-deep boys is being kept a secret, and whether there will be any imitations of the better known boys is not known, but that will be SOME BALL. Sunday morning after breakfast ere will be a program of competitive games for the group. At noon lunch there will be a spicy entertainment, and at 2 p. m. Sunday the real dates (otherwise known as transportation) will arrive at the camp and seek admission. After admission is gained by the boys there be more entertainment until eight p. m. The party is under the direction of Miss Spiess who urges all girls who have not yet signed up to do so before Monday. POPULAR brands of Cigarettes at Liggett's—14c a pack, $1.35 a car- KIRBY ■ NOW PLAYING Warren Williams CONSTANCE CUMMINGS "The Mindreader" SATURDAY "Picture Snatcher" JAMES CAGNEY S ALICE WHITE RALPH BELLAMY CAN WE LIVE WITHOT BODIES BY MOLLY SCHIMMEL Where do we go when we die What happens when we lose our bodies ? J we go anywhere? Does anything happen? Or do we just stop? Is death the end? Or do we go on living without our bodies, just as well, perhaps better, than when we had them? Spooky questions? Not at all. Simple and sensible questions. 'a quite as natural to think about life after death as it is to think of life in New York or Timbutoo, and many say that it is just as reasonable to believe that we go on living after we have passed the grave, to believe that we go on living after we have crossed the Atlantic. What is life, anyway? Nobody knows. For lack of a better understanding, we say that life is energy. Where do we find energy? find it in many places in the bodies of man and animals and plants. What does it do in those bodies It makes those bodies eat and sleep and breathe and grow. Life—energy—does these things in living bodies. The bodies themselves are not energy. They are simple masses of mineral and fat and water. But the energy lives inside those masses and works through them. Not always, though. Life—energy —does not always need a body to live in. The energy that lights your electric light does not need a body to exist. It exists without a bulb, though you only see it in that lighted bulb. The energy that speaks to you from your radio does not need that radio to exist. It exists without wires, without box, though you only hear it when you turn the dials. Every day wa see energy working in bodies. Every day we see energy working without a body. Now consider yourself. You are a certain person with an individual personality, called Bill Jones or Bessie Brown. WHITE CAFE FAMOUS FOR SIZZLING STEAKS "Tender as a Mother's Love" 814 Travis F-9440 rMAINANCKpRESTOfl THE HOME OF RICHARD CARLTON CLOTHING MAJESTIC WEEK SATURDAY APRIL 29 IN PERSON BENNY MEROFF And His Chase & Sanborn Orchestra SCREEN "HELLO SISTER" What does that really mean ? That means that you are acertain arrangement of energy inhabiting a certain body. The energy in you is very valuable, probably much more valuable than the energy in a turnip or a toad. At least, you and I think so. It has taken a long time for life to develop into the particular form of energy which makes men and women think and feel, love and hate, desire and fear. It has taken life a long time to make itself into you. Bill Jones, or you, Bessie Brown. And now, having taken millions of years in the making, are you suddenly going to stop? Will all that rare accumulation cease when the box which holds it breaks? Or will you be able to go without a body ? Other forms of energy live without a body. Light anl electricity and magnetism exists without bodies. Will that most precious and most powerful form of energy—the human soul—be lost for lack of a body while a tinkling jazz song goes on? Think about that. Every time you see an electric light, or turn on a radio dial, think about the light in you, the song song in you, the light and the song in those you have loved and lost. Are they really lost? Or do they live on without their bodies in a freer, wider life? "Your methods of cultivation are hopelessly out of date," said the youthful agricultural college graduate to the old farmer. "Why I'd be astonished if you got t*n pounds of apples from that tree." "So would I," replied the farmer. "It's a pear tree.' Horace Mills (in the country); Are you milking the cow? Farmer: Naw, just feeling her pulse. ALMEDA PHARMACY, Inc. "Your Drug Store" Holman and LaBranch H-8194 LOEWS STARTS FRIDAY JOAN CRAWFORD and GARY COOPER "Today We Live" METROPOLITAN SAT. 11 to 1—25c "Central Airport" With Richard Barthelmess Salty Eilers Plus Metropolitan Orchestra DAVID PESETZKI Conducting
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