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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932 - File 001. January 27, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 12, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/64/show/60.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 27, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/64/show/60

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932 - File 001, January 27, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 12, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/64/show/60.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 5, January 27, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 5, January 27, 1932
Contributor
  • Marks, A.
Date January 27, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript CAST A BEAUTY BALLOT THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE SUPPORT STUDENT ACTIVITIES HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27, 1932 STUDENT VOTERS URGED TO PAY POLL TAX Scheduled Elections of Vital Importance to All Citizens "Students and faculty members of Houston Junior college will find ample opportunities for using their poll tax receipts during the next 12 montha," Prof Harvey W. Harris, public speaking instructor, stated Wednesday, in calling attention to the need for paying poll taxes before the end of January. American government and institutions are based upon the right of citizens to express their wishes through the use of the ballot, according to Mr. Harris. With many elections scheduled for the coming year, every qualified voter should be prepared to cast his vote for those men and those laws which are for the best interests of the city, state, and nation. "We' may jind very soon that the right to vote as our convictions dictate will be worth a great deal to all of us. No time in history has been more fraught with danger than in this era through which we are passing," Mr. Harris said. "Surely we will meat the need of the hour by paying the $1.56 fee for a poll tax, in order to use our right to vote for those individuals whom we believe to be best able to guard and promote the best interests of our schools, our city, onr state, and our nation." PAY YOUR POLL TAX! THE HEAD-MAN SHADOWGRAPHS SHOWN TO STUDENT ASSEMBLY Lollypop got her man. And what a man! A poor, very thin sailor! But he was white and he knew how to make love to her. Lollypop and the poor sailor were characters in the shadow-acting play given by the' John R. Bender Dramatic society in the auditorium during the assembly period, January 20. Stewemalivt was the name of the romantic cannibal island where King (Continued on page 2) Dramatic Club To Present Three Act Play March 4 "Polly with a Past." is to be the first 1932 production of the John R. Bender Dramatic club, according to an announcement made recently by Mrs. Pearl C. Bender, sponsor of the club. All students are welcome to try out for places in the cast, and practice will start immediately. The play is of three acts, and some twenty odd players are needed. Mrs. Lyle T. Hooker, co-sponsor of the club with Mrs. Bender, will direct the play which will be presented March 4 in the auditorium. Students will tie admitted upon presentation of their blanket tax receipts, while a nominal fee will be charged outsiders. As a matter of practice, the club put on a series of three one-act plays late in November, 1931, and they were very successful. An unusual amount of ability was shown by the three casts, and all students were greatly pleased with the presentations. Mrs. Hooker, who also directed the short plays, gave lessons in the art of makeup before the club, and when the actual plays were presented, those taking part were able to apply their own makeup. The same procedure will be followed this time, and the extra knowledge will greatly benefit the club members. Hrs. Hooker deserves all possible credit for her part in making the productions a success, and on behalf of all of you, we want to give her this meager thanks. = J HE FLEW a \jJ PLANE AT KELLY FIELD ASSISTANT DEAN OF "THE houston junior college HE IS AN EXPERT HOT TAWae MAKER AND Feeps THEM To EMPLOYEES IN The School OfficeM COUGARS TO BATTLE CLOTHIERS^ TONIGHT Tonight, Wednesday, 27th, 9:45 p.m., the Houston Junior college Cougar cage outfit takes on the highly touted Nathan's Clothiers in the main gymnasium. The public is invited; admission free. The Nathan's aggregation boasts a group of prominent Rice institute's athletes, among which are "Bobo" Mc- Knight, "Sheriff" Pud Hammett, "Red" Bourne, Lou Hassell, Fay Lagow, "Pepper" Smith, Dick Lauterbeck, and many others. Besides holding down second place in the fast Club League, the Nathan's bunch is rated as one of the leading quintets in the city. With several wins under theijr belt, Junior college will put a classy fwe on the floor that will make the game a first-class thriller. Coach French will probably use this starting line-up: Forwards, Pech and Matthews; guards, Gayle and Weed; center, Brahnam. AN APPRECIATION The Cougar wishes to thank the Houston Post-Dispatch for being so good as to make a large number of engravings for it. Read the Cougar and the Post-Dispatch. LIBRARY CLUB HOLDS FIRST 1932 MEETING The Houston Junior college library club held its first meeting of the new year at the home of Bernice Branum. An interesting program dealing with the different phases of library work was given. The program included "A Comparison of the New Libraries with the Old," by Lewis Reuckert; "Self Charging System," by Bernice Branum; "Kiss Me Good-night byt Not Goodbye," by Bernice Branum; "Administrative Control of Book Losses," by lone Brown. The newly elected officers are Lewis Reuckert, president; Bernice Branum, vice president; Ora Louise Morgan, secretary; Allyne Allen, treasurer; Isabella Ventresca, reporter; Bernice Branum, chairman of the program committee, and her assistants are Ora Louise Morgan and Marion Banta; Zelda Osborn, chairman of the social committee, and her assistants are Isabella Ventresca and Jeanette Willman. After the program, luncheon was served. President Reuckert announced that another meeting will be held in the very near future. Cougars Pass Way to Defeat Ice Co. A smooth-working pack of Houston Junior College Cougars passed their way to a lop-sided 37-9 win over Houston Ice Cream Company Monday night at the San Jacinto gym. It was the accurate passing attack of the Cougars' cage team that featured the uneven tilt. Time after time a fast break for the basket, tuned with a quick pass under the basket, put the Cougars in position for an easy crip shot. SPRING TERM WILL BEGIN FEBRUARY 1 Approximately 150 new students will enroll in the Junior College for the spring term of the 1931-32 session, according to an announcement by N, K. Dupre, assistant dean. Registration for new students will be held Tuesday, February 2, with all old students who have not registered at the early date, registering on February 1. Registration hours will be from 4 to 9 p.m. both days. Courses open to new students will be English, math, chemistry, engineering drawing, education, journalism, public speaking, history, French, Spanish, music, and physical training. Chemistry 114, math 113, English 113, education 113 and 114, and engineering drawing will be offered only if there is sufficient enrollment in these Old students will continue their present courses. Subjects offered them are physics, chemistry, biology, history, economics, government, sociology, math, English, public speaking, journalism, education, accounting, engineering drawing, psychology, and physical training. The Junior College faculty will remain unchanged for the new term. LANGSTON KING HIGH IN PRAISE OF COLLEGE Judge Langs ton G. King of the Criminal District Court was the speaker at the assembly period on January 13. "I am glad to be able to visit you," said Judge King, "but I do not want any of you to have to come to see me." Only one-sixth of our criminals are born criminals; five-sixth of them are the results of our corrupt society. Our schools will have to change the people. The moral training that some do not find at home will have to.be supplied by the school. Most of our criminals are morons and do not last very long in school. Even the morons could be trained to live a normal useful life. Judge King was high in his praise of the work the schools are now doing. Why Didn't You Kick Him, Walter? -:- Imagine if you can the thrill of meeting Otis Skinner in person. Think of the added excitement of taking part in one of his plays. Do you believe that you could call him dirty names, spit on him, and then bulldoze him into thanking you for it and giving you his personal autograph? Last week Walter Garrett, being broke as usual, and wishing to see the "Merchant of Venice," decided that he would take the position of usher offered him by a friend. Upon arriving at the City Auditorium he discovered that no more ushers were needed but was allowed to come in ana1 see the play anyway. "I have arranged with a friend of mine to get a part as an extra in the court scene. "The manager won't be back stage and I think that I can sneak you up to my dressing room," said Garrett's AH this was accomplished with comparative ease and the next thing that Walter knew he was on the stage sitting in the jury box feeling very contented until the manager came up and shouted: "That boy over on the end there!" "At first I thought she meant me," Garrett said, "but it turned out that she was talking to the Italian next to me. We were all dressed in long Venetian robes with big felt hats. It was the court scene and when Mr. Skinner came in we were supposed to get up and say uncomplimentary things about him in Italian. Not knowing any Italian I just said, Blah, blah, blah!' 'When Mr. Skinner made his exit we were supposed to show our contempt for him by getting up and spitting on him, so I got to spit on Otis Skinner, all of which I thought to be quite an honor." "After the act my companion suggested that we ask Otis Skinner for his autograph. "At the head of the stairs we w«re met by a very tall looking man who said that we 'positively couldn't see Mr. Skinner.' We explained that we were extras and so he finally consented to let us get an autograph—but we didn't get to see Mr. Skinner—well." At first Coach French's charges could not get started but with the score tied 2-2 at the end of the first period, the college bunch cut loose with a fast- breaking attack that piled up a 19-4 lead for them by the half. A timely defensive rally by the Ice Cream cagers kept the third quarter from being another scoring party for the Cougars, who slowed up and fell back into a tight defense that limited the Ice Cream outfit to one field goal. The final quarter climaxed the night for tho Cougars, who ran rampant and went on a scoring spree for twelve markers. H. D. Matthews and Bob Brahnam, star Junior College forwards, put on the head man act and ran up a total of 22 points. Matthews taking high point honors for the night with 12 cyphers and Brahnam one goal behind with 10 points. By switching Weed to center French's offense worked nicely. Bond and F. Matthews were the big shots for the Ice Cream boys with Matthews scoring 8 out of his team's 9 points. Attired in new uniforms, the Cougar^ made a fine appearance and seemed in good shape for the fight with Nathan's Clothiers to take place Wednesdy night, January 2?rrr~ Line up—H. J. C.: Forwards, Stone and H. Matthews; guards, Weed and Pech; center, Brahnam. Ice Cream Co.: Forwards, F. Matthews and Williams; guards, Brown and Hill; center. Bond. STUDENTS URGED TO CAST FINAL BALLOTS Finis will be written to the Cougar Beauty contest with the ballot in this issue of The Cougar. This announce- men came Tuesday from F. R. Birney, sponsor of the paper. The last ballot on which it will be possible to cast a vote appears at the bottom of this story. According to Birney, interest in the contest has been far below that expected, and of the few votes cast, Ruth Depperman, Wilma Lindsay, and Hulda Alexander have received overwhelming majorities. Birney said also that the students of the college should show more interest and cast this last vote just to prove that they can really move and are not dead. Cy Shaw expressed the same opinion, but in a different way. Cy contends that if someone were to throw a lighted stick of dynamite into any classroom at any period when the smoke cleared away, Mr. Miner would still be asking ques- We don't agree with Cy wholly, because we have received some votes from Mr. Miner's students, however, we would like to show Mr. Birney that all of the students aren't "dead" (Continued on page 3) Aha! Me Proud Beauty! Mark an X by your choice. Most Beautiful Sophomore— NELDA SMITH MARGUERITE COMHAlHE MARGARET MOUNGER ' HULDA ALEXANDER Most Beautiful Freshman— RUTH DEPPERMAN WILMA LINDSAY JEAN WEATHERALL MELBADEL WRIGHT PATSY INMAN
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