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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932
File 004
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932 - File 004. October 12, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/54/show/53.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 12, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/54/show/53

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932 - File 004, October 12, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/54/show/53.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 1, October 12, 1932
Contributor
  • Waggoner, Mary Esther
Date October 12, 1932
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript PAGE FOUR THE COUGAR Aviation Are you interested in a course in aviation, dealing with theory and practical instruction? If so, please see Mr. Dupre and try to help us along in securing such a course to be presented in our College. Yours truly, while talking in a very informal way the other night with tho Superintendent of Sctiools, Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, remarked that he thought that a course in aviation would be practical and timely if presented as a non-credit course. The understanding was that if enough students and outside people were interested in such a course, it might be presented as a non-credit course. As some of you probably know present assistant dean, Mr. Dupre, during the past war was an instructor at Kelly Field, and he will be of great assistance in our securing such course. He is interested in aviation and as most of us appreciate, in each and every one. of us. The thought is that the theorial flight and a course in aerial dynamics shall be presented two days a week" in the classrooms, and a third class a week be held at an airport where practical experience and instruction will be given to the students. If this course is presented, it will be the first course of its kind ever to be given in any college in Texas. We hope that ;t will be a success, as the successful ness of it lies in your hands. If you are interested see me. Mack Douglas. STUDENTS FAILING TO SUPPORT CAFETERIA That the Houston Junior College cafeteria has not had the proper response by the students was the substance of an interview Friday with Mrs. Winona Morris, head of the cafeteria.. Because the cafeteria is under the supervision of the lunch room department of the Houston public school system, delicious, wholesome food is assured. The cafeteria is featuring a plate lunch for 10 cents, a choice of a meat and vegetable, or two vegetables with slice of tomato or celery. All otner items are five cents with the exception of milk, which sells for three cents a half pint. "We certainly have not had the proper amount of response, &o I should like to take this opportunity to urge every student and faculty member to patronize the cafeteria," Mrs. Morris stated. Dinner session is held from 7:00 to 7:30 p.m. HEROISM OF H. J. C. ATHLETIC COACH IS REVEALED.IN STORY Coach Archie French is a hero. Hit heroism recently won for him the coveted honor of being made a member of the Order of the Sacred Heart. This Order was created by George Washington to honor certain of his aides, and its medal has been conferred upon only a few men since Washington's time. The story goes that Coach French, then Captain French of the 78th Company, 6th Regiment of the U. S. Marines, almost lost his own life in a brave attempt to save the life of a soldier in his company during the World War, The soldier lay helpless under German gunfire, alive but unable to move from his exposed position. Captain French crawled over the top and across No Man's Land, and though wounded almost immediately, got his The soldier died, but the fact of Captain French's heroism remains unchanged, and has finally been recognized by the Order of the Sacred Heart. Mild-mannered Coach French was a hard-boiled Marine for 17 years. He has fought for his country in every part of the globe. Cops Question Cougar Editor Did you ever break a plate glass door in a downtown building? I have—and deliberately. This is a confession, the signed confession of criminal. Cold Saturdays are depressing. The psychological effect of an unaccustomed day of working is not to be undci ;timated. The Cougar was due come out Wednesday and I, with my own little brain power, simply had to get the copy in shape by night. I had worked since early that morning and just finished the last detail at o'clock. All alone in tbe office I had toiled bacause one by one every one had left, instructing me to be sure that Ihe night lock worked when I left the office. Remembering their admonitions I carefully tested the door as I left the printer's-ink scented place and stepped into the dimly lighted hall. My unlocked car was sitting out by the curb and I was very anxious to get it home before someone casually stepped into it and drove it off. So you can imagine my complete dismay when I walked down the stairs to the door and found it locked. Locked ti that dim hall and out of the offices. Frantic, I rushed up the stairs and tattled every door in the dark corridor. Then I stood, breathing heavily on the head of the stairs, with my mind racing over the exact things that it should not have raced over. Would they read my diary when I died? How long would the air in the enclosed hall last? Could a nice little death notice be squeezed in the copy I just had finished? Then eerily the sound of the phone in the Labor Journal office came down the hall. I knew it was my mother with whom I had spoken just a few minutes before, and who had bade me hurry home. Almost simultaneously an ambulance screamed by. I couldn't stay there 'till Monday! Standing there I spoke aloud to my- lf. "Nice place you have here Mesta. Just make yourself at home." The sound of my thick and labored voice did not, contrary to popular opinion, calm me. There are two doors to the building, ■ rather, a double door with two parts. ne had a grill over it and the glass in it had been patched at the top; the other glass door was unhampered. So considerately I took a broom and broke the glass to the patched door. Of course, is I crawled out between the grill I tut myself. With the blood pouring I made up my face, wishing I were pret- ■, for the inevitable encounter with the law. No cop was in sight, so I made my way in my good ole car to the large and moronic audience I had attracted, ;nd asked advice. I was informed that the police were on the way, so I sat and bled until two plain clothes men questioned me. They never got it into their heads that I was not silly for choosing to break a plate glass door rather than telephoning (on what?) for Needless to say I, starting with a giggle, had hysterics on the way home. (Signed) Mary Esther Waggoner. GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM OUTLOOK FOR NEXT YEAR BRIGHT With eighteen girls on the squad, the Houston Junior College girls' basketball team has a bright outlook on its coming campaign. From all indications, the team, under the capable hands of Miss Spiess, girls' athletic coach, should be as good or better than the one that the girls had last The girls will play outside teams such as the Rice Hotel Cafeteria and Methodist Church. On Friday, October 14, 1932, the girls are going to meet and organize an Activity Club. The members of this club will go horseback riding, hiking, ice skating, golfing and sunrise breakfasting. The girls will also have volley ball, tennis, and swimming teams. Miss Spiess is introducing a new game called "Leniqotes," to the girls and later on they will take up field hockey, soccer, and shuffle-board. Some of the girls have shown an interest in ping-pong, so several tables have been ordered. All the equipment has not come yet, so Miss Spiess has no definite idea of further plans, but with the ones mentioned the girls should find enough to keep them busy as they practice only five days a week. Ferguson -Sterling Question Debated Heated Discussion on Political Subject Held by Members of Public Speaking Class Due to the great interest that has been shown locally in the Democratic nominees for governor of Texas, six members of Mr. Harris' public speaking class debated the question Friday, September 30, 1932, at 8:30 p.m. HARRIS SPEAKS AT MEN'S FACULTY MEET Harvey W. Harris was scheduled to speak at the Mens' Faculty Club of the Houston Junior College at the Bluebell it 12 noon Wednesday. Mr. Harris' subject was Reasons for Poor College Teaching. This subject is in keeping with the program which has been set up for the si udy of various aspects of college training. At each meeting some phase of college training is discussed by the member* The organization was started during the spring term of 1932. There are 12 members now in the association, which is made up entirely of the men faculty members of the college. Warren W. Rees is president of the club, assisted by Samuel L. Bishkin. vice president; and A. L. Kerbow, secretary-treasurer. The program committee Is composed of S. W. Henderson, who is chairman, and Archie W. French and Harvey W Harris. Sports Menu Is Promising Track, Swimming, Tennis, Boxing, Hockey in Curriculum The general outlook for an interesting year of Junior College sports that will compare favorably with other years is exceptionally bright according to Director of Physical Education, Mr. French. Competition will be intensely keen between classes ss well as between the Junior College and other organized clubs. An outstanding curriculum of sports of which the school may well be proud is the prospect forecast by our likeable coach. A classy track team, with several veteran men back from last year, is expected. In addition these old candidates will be given no mean competition for places on the team by athletes who have graduated from the city's five senior high schools. A well-organized swimming team is in the making and a promising num- I ber of candidates for the tennis and boxing teams, the latter which will start classes in several days, swell the > lists of an interesting number of ath- I letic events. Several other sports, including ice-hockey, may be added later. Interest in Junior College sports this year is exceptionally keen and a large number of candidates are out in hopes of making the respective teams. Those interested should get lined up immediately. New students will rejoice that the activity fee, which is charged annually with the regular tuition fee, will cover ali games and that all that is needed to gain admittance is the activity card which may be obtained from Mr. South. The athletics of the Junior College are self-supporting and there is no plan to consolidate the athletic fund with the common one now in practice among the high schools of the city. The Junior College is indeed fortunate in having so experienced a man as Mr. French as its physical director. A middle-aged man with iron- gray hair and a direct gaze, we all know him to be of a windly disposition but possessing a direct-to-the- point attitude that is convincing. His experience in dealing with students makes him well liked by all pupils. Before coming to Junior College he has attained success in schools in various parts of the country. Just prior to coming to Houston he was Pacific Instructor of Marine Officers School and before that was Director of Physical Education at Eugene, Oregon. Sterling was introduced by the first speaker as a potent agent in the advancement in Texas of Child Welfare, having been instrumental in passing numerous laws which brought about the protection of abandoned and linquent children. His honesty and integrity as shown in his management of the affairs of the state were commended as responsible for Texas having been carried "safely over the skim of the depression". These points were immediately attacked by the Ferguson speaker, who pointed out that the only thing in evidence as done by Sterling was the oil proration. Sterling was criticized severely for that move, whereby with the aid of armed men in uniforms, he literally drove thousands of honest laborers from their daily toil. Governor Sterling was compared to a donkey who starved to death deliberating between two stacks of hay; the governor was accused of having starved Texas to death while he deliberated between his personal millions and the governorship of Texas. The Ferguson supporters demanded to hear a report on what Sterling did with the million dollars he is accused of taking from the State Highway department. They credited Jim Ferguson, patron of education, as having done more for the advancement of the schools of Texas and institutes for the infirm than any other individual as opposed to Ross Sterling, with having nothing concrete to his credit except his own "flat pocketbook." The last speaker for Sterling showed the vast benefit reaped from the oil proration by the governor, and pleaded with the citizens not to fool themselves into buyirg "two tyrant governors for the price of one". Fred R. Birney, journalism instructor, as presiding officer, introduced the following speakers: Tom Cooksey, Hulon Crawford, Bill Stanford, for Ferguson; and Anthony Crapritto, Allan Marshall, Joe Polichino, for ■Sterling. No decision was rendered. Women's Facalty Group Holds Special Meeting The Women's Faculty Association of the Houston Junior College held a special meeting Saturday, October 8, in the Lamar cafeteria, at which time officers for the fall term were elected. Mrs. W. H. Miner was elected chairman of the association. She is tho successor of Mrs. Pearl C. Bender, college registrar. Mrs. E. E. Oberholtzer was named honorary chairman and Miss Sue Thomason , vice-chairman. The members elected Mrs. L. T. Hooker as secretary-treasurer. "The organization began during the fall of 1931," according to Mrs. Bender, "and was conducted entirely for social purposes. "This year the club will discuss foreign countries with Mrs. B. M. Ebaugh and Miss Thomason conducting the programs." At present there are 25 members in the club, including women of the college teaching staff and wives of the men faculty members. The first regular meeting of the association will be held at the home of Mrs. Bender, 3220 Cbenevert Street, October 29. You are always welcome at the Arrow Pharmacy Friends Meet" 1504 Holman DEBATE COACH— (Continued from Page 1) dramatics last year; and many others. All Junior College students are eligible for the debate team, and any who arc interested in trying out should get in touch with Professor Harris as soon as possible. ALMBDA PHARMACY PHONE HADLEY 8194 Holman at LaBranch HOUSTON, TEXAS The SAN JACINTO CAFE Holman at LaBranch St. Where the students and the faculty eat, drink, and are merry C. A, SCAKLAN, Prop. MASSEY Business College ■THE COURSE TO SUCCESS" Shorthand and Typewriting Will Aid You in Taking Your Lectures in Your College Course j The most sweetness and beauty ever collected and placed in a single film! NORMA SHEARER In M-G-M's SMILIN' THROUGH" 25c Till 1 P.M. LOEWS MAIN at RUSH Here's Wher-4 Yoa Get 'Em! NEW LEATHER JACKETS $4.95 NEW CORDUROY SLACKS $2.50 O. K. ALL OVER ASK JIMMIE BRINKLEY Our H. J. c. Representative
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