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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932 - File 002. October 12, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/54/show/51.

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(October 12, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/54/show/51

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932 - File 002, October 12, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/54/show/51.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 1, October 12, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 1, October 12, 1932
Contributor
  • Waggoner, Mary Esther
Date October 12, 1932
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript PAGE TWO THE COUGAK THE COUGAR Issue editor News editor Sponsor STAFF EDITORIAL Mary Esther Waggoner Hope McCutcheon — -F. R. Birney Jokes Humor . Feature Sport Literary Artist DEPARTMENTAL Jill Jenkins - James Julian ..... Mack Douglas ... Jack Dempsey . Louise Heydrick .... Fairfax Moody Business Manager Advertising Manager. Minnie Tapick Jimmie Brinkley REPORTERS Ovide Boulet, Florence Kendrick, Elizabeth King, Bob Stallings, Cortis Lawrence, Milton Gregory, Curtis Casey, Elmer Hamilton, Tommie Cooksey, Jessie Darling, Isabel McDaniel, C. W. Skipper, Harry Flavin. JUST FRIENDS Wherever you go, you will always find someone who offers advice and criticism, and usually the one with the most sins throws the most stones. Knowing this to be true, I don't feel at all out of place in saying what I do. Why can't we adopt a more friendly attitude toward one another at Houston Junior College? Not that I have noticed any signs of hostility (excepting, of course, at the freshman reception), but I believe that there is always room for improvement. Why not acquire the habit of speaking to everyone, no matter when, where, or how many times a night we see them? Everyone will have a better time and a lot of us will soon learn that Junior College is not such a bad place after all. I believe it will promote school spirit and make our dances and,' receptions bigger successes. And freshmen! Don't be timid or bashful. Horn into everything and have a good time. If you feel that you have something to say, say it. You will soon get over your bashfulness and before long you will have reached the point where you had just as soon walk in on President Hoover and bum him for a cigarette as not. Also a word tcl the freshman girls. Don't hesitate to ask a boy whom you haver formally met for a cigarette. He will probably be "fresh out" but he will appreciate the compliment, I'm sure. a word to the two or three who may have finished this article: Please read the first few lines again so there will not be any misunderstanding. CONTACTS "Everything I am today," a man once declared, "I owe to my fel- lowmen." It sounds a little strange, coming from a contemporary of a mad, selfish generation, doesn't it? That man was wrong. He owed nobody but himself. He realized, perhaps quite early in life, that he obtained from it as mucn as he put into it, that as much good did he spend, that much would he ; skilled plastic surgeon for $500 STOP ME— IF YOU'VE HEARD THESE— By MILTON GREGORY A brief insight on eccentric facts, compiled in an erratic way by a goofy author: Not one person in 100,000 can pronounce all these common words correctly: "daia; gratis; culinary; cocaine; gondola; version; imoios; chic; Carrib- bean; Viking"—Som3 of you smart col- 'ege guys see if I'm wrong. There is exactly 10 times as much unemployment in the United States as in Mexico. We aren't so good after all. At Panama the sun rises- in the Fabric and sets in the Atlantic. New York City lies west of the Pacific— that part of it which touches Africa in Chile. Traveling at the speed of light (186,000 miles per second) it would ;;tke a radio wave over 40,000 year:; to ravel the distance o. .ween the Earth :-nd one of the stars in the Hercules Cluster. This may cramp the styli those who in future centuries endeavor lo carry on a correspondence with Hercules. Contrary to what is ordinarily be- ileved, men are much safer automobile drivers than women, under identical conditions—wait until the girls read this. If you are interested in opening a speakeasy, you can buy a book giving complete details as to what you will have to do and how much it will cost you to stay in business. If a table is laid for eight people, the number of ways they can take their places reaches the astounding total of 40,320. Read in a newspaper published by olored editors: "Mr. Thompson, proprietor of the Thompson Pressing Club, has the honor of being the father of his wife's baby girl." What is "the meaning of this sentence? "Neither those who do not be- is not socially incorrect to refuse to accept misplaced flattery nor hose who believe the contrary will admit they are not right." The narcotic addict, who willingly gives himself up to the authorities does not do so to bo cured, but to accustom himself to a reduced dose so that he may again be financially able to th© habit, by getting the same kick out of one grain that he was for-, erly getting from 12 to 15 grains per »y- The telephone company will be glad to furnish second hand directories for you strong men who make a habit of tearing three or four of them in two with your bare hands. You can get your face lifled by a receive. So in the contacts that he made with strangers he put into them an impressive force, something strong enough to cause him to be recommended modestly. He treated every individual whom he met with courteous attention. Their feelings were his feelings, and he regarded them as suchjj All men were his equals, even his inferiors, and he treated them accordingly. One day he met a man whom he hardly remembered. "I've thought of you many times," complimented the .almost forgotten man, "and wished I could find you. We need a man like you in my corporation—a big man." He remembered him now. He was the man whom he spared of being expelled from school when they were boys by taking the blame himself. bargain face lift for as little How many do you need? Ex-Mayor Jimmy Walker i times over 75 suits of clothe; about 3165 each. i $50. 5 at all costing DON'T QUIT When things go wrong, as they sometimes will, When the road you're trudging seems all uphill, When the funds are low and the debts are high And you want to smile, but you have to sigh, When c%re is pressing you down a bit, Rest if you must, but do not quit. Life is queer with its twists and turns As every one of us sometimes learns, And many a failure turns about When he might have won had he stuck Don't give up, though the pace seems slow— You may succeed with another blow. Often the goal is nearer than It seems to a faint and faltering man; Often he might have captured the victor's cup. And he learned too late, when the light slipped down, How close he was to the golden crown. Success is failure turned inside out— The silver tint of the clouds of doubt, And you can never tell how close you It may be near when it seems afar; So stick to the fight when you're hardest hit— when things seem worst that you mustn't quit. Tiger Echoes OUR PAST Although we have a great number of nice new students this year we can't help missing those students of last year who, after achieving their hard earned '"sheep skins" from our college have gone to other schools to finish their four-year course. Among those at State this year Marian Adams, O. D. Brown, Rena Mai Butler, Roger Bell, Elizabeth Dickinson, Violet Herbert, Hugo Englehardt, John Heaner, Beatr Loock, Marian Moore, James Mc- Cardle, Boone Roberts, and Milford Smith. Jeanne Wetherall is attending Soph Newcombe College in New Orleans. Imogene and Lorene Kinzback are attending Brenan College in Cames- ville, Georgia. Among those at Rice are Margaret Brown, P. L. Cooper, Philip Allen, Randolph Goodman, Elizabeth Kerbou, Frank Mies, George Le Fever, Carol Wildman and Erna Throgmartin. Those attending the Texas Dental College this year are Allen Carpenter, ""'. F. Tavell, F. G. Summers, and E. McConnell. Arthur Burns is at the St. Louis University. Donald and Ronald Lee are at S. . U. ' INITIATION DIFFICULTIES The statement has often been made that there is no school spirit at H. J. C. Various reasons have been ascribed, such as the fact that we do not participate in certain forms of athletics, and the fact that we are a night school. Unfortunately, we are not permitted to live in dormitories where several hundred fellow students all become one big happy family, and consequently we do not get to know as many of the students as well as we would otherwise. The methods which upper-classmen devise to show their seniority, and their supposed superiority are not so practical here. The way we are situated eliminates the possibility of (lie "stacked" room, the pouring of water out the window on courters who return in the wee hours of the morning to catch a little bit of sleep before that eight o'clock class, trunk-carrying by the freshmen at the beginning and end of school, and the honorary "degrees" so generously conferred upon the freshmen by the up- per-classmen at the end of the school year, by methods not always in accord with the wishes of the faculty. Nevertheless, the practice of wearing "slime" caps and green ties, rolling up one's trousers, carrying books for no other reason than that somebody, quite as able-bodied as oneself, has requested (or demanded) it, using side doors, and dozens of other ways invented to humiliate the lowly freshman, are not exactly extinct here. Any sophomore can tell you, too, that a freshman comes in handy when there is a pretty girl around that he would like to know. The freshman merely introduces himself, and then introduces his friend, a high and mighty sophomore. Thus traditions grow from hard soil and thus we may be encouraged to carry on toward school unity. Here are being used "new" and "old" in a technical, or special sense, "newu not meaning really old. An "old" student is one who has registered in H. J. C. before this fall; a "new" student is one who hasn't. In other words, an "old" student may be neither much of a student nor very old, and a "n student may have been several times an old student at some other college. Now, dear reader, to get on with my story. Speaking very roughly but not therefore impolitely, four students cut of every six in the Junior College are old students, one of the six is a new student, who has been to another college, and the last one of the six is a student direct from high school. The last-named, is a really, truly greeny "frosh," the next is a "transfer," and the others are "back agains." Welcome to the "back agains," who have the intelligence or the money, or the love of study or that whatever it was that brought thsm back. Without ihe 'back agains," the upper class would be nearly depopulated and the student body would be much smaller. How could we have these tradition.'; that "we are building up without the "back agains?" We cannot have a Junior College of the first class without them. Three times welcome therefore to the "back agains." All ot the faculty is glad to see all of you back. Three times welcome to the new students! You are even more essential than the "back agains" for without new students we cannot have a Junior College at all, much less one of the first class. Three welcomes to the "transfers from other colleges" among the new students! You have at last discovered the right way and turned to Houston Junior College. Over you there much rejoicing. And there is a n basis for rejoicing; you are bringing into the Junior College much good, learned in other colleges; you make the student body less local and r row; you increase the percentage of upper classmen; you mark the growth of the Junior College to higher rank. Lastly, three times welcome to the new student froshes, direct from the high school. You are the little acorns out of which the great oaks grow. You pre not so inferior to the above Welcomed groups as the said groups would have you believe. Sometimes it takes a very delicate instrument to detect '.ho difference between a freshman and a senior! You are the material out of which all colleges, whether junior or senior, grow. Everybody now being welcomed, everybody should also be both happy anrj warned. College time is a most wonderful time—a time to be looked back to during all of your subsequent life. Interesting, important, wonderful things are to be looked forward to £tnd* learned in your hours of study. The finest of friendships are to be formed in ths hours of relaxation, For anybody fit to go to college, life at collega is crammed with opportunity and delight. You who still have some We registered late, at the last minute, which is characteristic of us. Consequently familiar faces looked like flowers in a sea of thorns. The first day (or is it night?) was a blur of impressions starting with a bewildered enthusiasm and ending with an occasional sleepy slap at a mosquito. Firstly we saw Miss Bender and marveled at the easy, good-humored efficiency of her. She's a honey, a brick and one of the best personalities In our very first class we saw people —some people! Artelle Kittredge, a dancer and an airy one as her name suggests, in a studious pose; Wiltsie Platzer, the man of many mechanics— a traveler, a football player, a boat enthusiast, and a high mogul in that boating club, the Somethingorothers; Joe Parker, for whom we never had much respect but quite a bit of affection;' Max Cohen, one of Sam Hous- tons most mischievous children; and tall and dignified, Sara Sue Rich. What! No cliques, no violent gatherings?—or did we get in the wrong part of the building? After the mad rush of Sam Houston 'tween classes the occasional high heeled clatter and sweatered whistle carries a mausoleum unearthiliness. What price dignity! The bells! They have no co-ordination, no enthusiasm, and too much independent spirit. After a quiet flurry in the corridor announces that a period is over, the bell, or perhaps it is a buzzer, gathers the idea and lets out a feeble cry. Or sometimes it waits until it's dern good and ready before it earns its current. Biological names are terrible. Why not call a flat-one-celled-worm a flat- one-celled-worm instead of a—well, instead of what they call it? Ah, there were Frankie English, the industrious young_ lady, and Sarah Molly Schim- ■ mel and Israel—don't ask his last name, after thrdfe years we still call him Israel—Mr. Robschemmmanskuvingly- off, indeed! That's not his real name— its' not quite involved enough. Mosquitoes! What use is a Flit gun among a swarm that pours in the , windows empty, and barges out capacity full? And they can stand the Flit every bit as pleasurably as we. Ah, good ole Bunny—pardon—Mr. Bimey. And Hope from year before last graduation. My we were happy until along came Fame and we made a break. A very petite but regal young lady entered and perched sur le bureau de le proffesssur (watch your accent). "Who is that?" we asked. A withering look accompanied the answer, > "Ruth Depperman." "Oh, I tho't she was beautiful!" Imagine our embarrassment! What we really meant was that from her picture, that well known filmy picture, we imagined her as tall and queenly and Greta Garbo in pul- chitrude. We apologize! At Sam Houston she was a highly senior when we • were a lowly soph, so what can you expect of us? r Jules Delambre and Joe Patterson, both sporting the good ole black and gold, in the form of handsome sweaters, and both handsome enough themselves to mistake for tall Greek gods in bronze, are seen rushing thru' the hall. And Billy Stevens, too, (dear boy, he finally has decided that edu- ' cation is important) appears busy. And then lunch—dinner—well, supper, then, in the lunchroom with a glimpse of Henriette Daigle inquiring about a dramatic club. She played lead in our senior iragedy (you heard me—tragedy), "Mansions". Hoping that everyone ate at the same place of the same fare we bought a dinner (Continued on Page 3) . of this fife before you are to be envied. And warned! Behind the flower urks the thorn. Then must be that •csistence to lazy living, fhat results , in pretty hard study, and that resis- tence to temptation, that results in an almost unspotted conscience. Perfection is scarcely to be hoped for, but * don't forget the Ten Commandments ]ust because you are in college. Being i college means all the way from verything to worse than nothing! What ii means to you depends on you. ; worthy of your opportunity to attend the Housion Junior College. # Have a good time in two senses cf the vord good, but remember that study s the major, while fun is a minor port.
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