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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931
File 004
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931 - File 004. November 18, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 7, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/49/show/48.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/49/show/48

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931 - File 004, November 18, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 7, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/49/show/48.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 2, November 18, 1931
Contributor
  • Conroe, Oscar
Date November 18, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript THE COUGAR Shooting The Basket By V. F. HARRISON Coach French has an adept helper for the first period gym class in Gene Chambers, Rice institute student. Chambers is working towards the coaching degree offered at the institute and is acquiring his number of hours as instructor by helping Coach French. Chambers is a senior at Rice and is well versed in the coaching of all sports, having lettered in track, basketball, and football during his freshman year and in track and football during his sophomore and junior year. Junior college should be proud to have in their midst a WHAT-A-MAN by the name of Lee Stone, diminutive freshman. Stone tips the scales at 138 pounds and is 5 feet 6 inches tall. Besides being a contender for the freshman basketball team, Stone is a football player of note, playing the quarterback position, a tennis player, winning honors at San Jacinto, and a swimmer of no mean ability. Among other aspirants for the freshman team are Malcolm Pech, San Jacinto football letterman and member of the basketball squad. Pech has plenty of fight ,loves the game, and shows up best at the forward post. George Gayle, letterman from Sam Houston High, is also bidding for a place on the "frosh" quintet. Gayle handles the ball exceptionally well and won his letter at guard. Jeff Davis is represented in a big way by Allen Weed, a rangy lad who lettered in track by heaving the shotput and played on the Davis five. Weed has lots of class at the center position. Around three lettermen Coach French has the task of molding a winning cage team. The returning letter- men are Fred Aebi, Harry Matthews, and Bob Branham. Aebi is a fast stepping forward with a mean eye for the basket. In the years gone by Aebi lettered with the Y. M. C. A. Triangles. Bob Branham, another veteran, is THE basketball player. Holding down the center post, Branham turned in many fine performances and will be a mainstay on the team this year. Harry D. Matthews is the other man that coach is pinning his hopes on. Matthews is at his best on the offensive and plays bang-up ball all the time. Harold Renfro and Leroy Dailey are a pair of nifty cagers that are. due to shine. Both have had past experience, Renfro playing with South Park Junior College and Dailey a member of last year's squad. As yet the response to the announcement of basketball practice has not been so gratifying but with a little time Coach French should have a capacity squad to choose from. Approximately 15 players have reported for each team and among these much ability and enthusiasm has been shown. All students interested in trying out for the team should see Coach French. For the students who are prone to take the hard knocks of life, a set of boxing gloves are numbered among the gym equipment. Wrestling is also carried on to a smaller degree and it is no uncommon sight to see two erstwhile Rudy Dusek's grappling in a corner. The arts of self-defense have proven extremely popular to the physical education classes and provide an outlet for some of the slime-soph antagonism. SOPHOMORE CAGERS HUMBLED BY SLIME QUINTET, 23 TO 20 After forcing a highly-touted soph cage machine to a five-minute overtime period, an inspired slime quintet rattled the basket for three markers in the last few minutes of play to take the game out of the hands of the upperclassmen, 23 to 20, in the San Jacinto gym Monday night. Led by the diminutive Lee Stone, Allen Weed, and George Gayle, the frosh battled and shoved their way to a tie in the third quarter. From then on, it was anybody's game. With the score tied 20-20 at the end of the game, the freshman offense clicked off three points in the early part of the overtime period and held the sophs scoreless to clinch the victory. With Harry D, Matthews and Bob Branhan at the helm, the upperclass- man offensive sailed into the frosh only to falter and about face in the shadow of the slime goal. The loss of the game with victory within their grasp will be an important incentive to the soph quintet to win the four games of the series, ihe second to be played at 10 p.m. today. If the remaining games are as hotly contested as the first, the winner of the series will probably be undecided until the final shrill of the whistle. Who will'win tonight? Your guess is as good as ours, so come out and see the teams in action and decide for yourself. No admission is charged. Broomtail— (Continued from page 1) which ish aboot th' on'y kind o' hoss they hash in thish country. Wha' I come frum, hosses wuz hosses, an' they didn't unload yuh every time yuh wanted t' go shomeplace. All yuh bromtails ish th* shame; plum' wild, no matter how much they ride yuh." Then, shaking his head solemnly, Hank reeled on down the street, his big hat on one side of his head, one pants leg out of his boot, the other halfway in. Suddenly he came to a stop. "Huh, them guys ain't frum thesh parts," said Hank, half under his breath. "They ain't ridin' broomtails, —and they shertainly ish ugly lookin' customers". Two men had come into town from the direction of the river, both riding well built horses. Their horses seemed fresh, and the men, though grizzled dirty, did not look as though they had come from any great distance—and yet, they were strangers. Hank was the only one to notice them, for they rode well in the shadows and kept their faces away from the fight as they passed bright doorways. The two strangers came to a halt in front of the lighted hank. The bank, like the stores, always stayed open on Saturday nights because it was more convenient for its customers, who had work to do during the week and only came to town on Saturday evenings. "Them fellows ain't up to no good", soliloquized Hank as the two dismounted and entered the bank, big Colts hanging low at their sides. Hank sat down and watched the entrance to the bank, his hand unconsciously reached for the "makins." He had not long to wait, for scarcely a moment had passed before a shot rang FRENZIED FROSH FROTHILY FROUGHT Teeth gnashed, nails bitten and handkerchiefs nervously twisted as Professor Henderson's class of Education 113 was preparing for the initial "test" of the term, "Hypothesis, neurones, chromosomes —what's it all about — Good Gawd! Somebody say something!" growled a bass voice. A co-ed spied a fellow-member of the class who was a Rice grad. "maybe y-you can hel-help us", she sobbed. "It won't do any d-dam—damage to try," he mocked. Whereupon psy- cological queries came at the young man so fast and in such numbers that he was confused. As the excitement reached a climax, Prof. "Henry" appeared. He smiled as only a veteran at handling such situations can smile. He told the freshies they "should be ashamed for fearing a measley little exam." After much persuasion, bantering, razzing and kidding he convinced the "pretty little things in green" that there was nothing to be dreaded. Amid giggles, laughter and sighs of relief the first official examination was administered to Education 113 students—L. R. Pell. Book Reviews out—and then anothei At this minute, one of the two strangers appeared in the door, carrying a heavily stuffed sack. The man jumped for his horse just as the other stranger appeared, backing out, smoking gun leveled. Then his gun crashed forth again. At the sound of the shot, the horse that the stranger leaped for jerked back, breaking its bridle, and bolted down the street. By this time, men were crowding out of the stores and saloons and running for the bank. The stranger with the money ran for another horse and was mounted by the time his confederate had turned and made a flying leap for his own horse. They wheeled their horses and bolted down the street in the direction of the river. They had gone perhaps twenty yards, when the stolen horse made a leap in the air and came down in a bone crushing, stiff legged buck. The stranger, dropping the money bag, went sailing through the air to land head first in a public watering trough. Bullets were whin ing, women screaming, men cursing. The second and another, j bandit turned furiously and came back defense of his comrade and thefr loot. When he reached the trough, the unfortunate man was being dragged from the water, dazed and bleeding. With an oath, the bandit reached for his gun, but before he could touch it, a bullet tore its way through his chest. Frantically, he clawed his breast, then slipped from the horse—dead. Hank rose drunkenly from his seat by the building and reeled his way back to the saloon. On entering, he was accosted by one of the dancing girls. Hank snorted and made his way toward the bar. Now, suh! Wimmin' an' broomtils don't interish me none atall" and he hung his heel over the rail. COCONUT OIL Want to have a world of fun? Then visit Darkest Africa with charming June Triplett, in Corey Ford's latest howling success, COCONUT OIL. It is a thoroughly delightful take-off on all African travel books,—an amazing expedition to end all African expeditions. Traverse miles of jungle with a modern lady-explorer who goes armed with lipstick and camera. Visit O-Yeah, W.D. (Witch Doctor), and get yourself a new ghost. Or drive with June in an Austin to Itsi-Bitsi, the Pigmy Village, and get gloroiusly intoxicated on their famous drink, the Pigmy-Up. Learn a score of amusing, idiotic facts about the jungle and the African natives which could have originated only in the mind of Corey Ford. You will find Chester Drawers, the professional stowaway and Conquering hero, and faithful Britches, the protector and wise-cracker, as interesting a pair as you have encountered recently. You will cheer Chester as he rescues the fair June, and you will tremble (with laughter) at the fate of Britches when he falls into the hands of the cannibal king and his wite goddess consorts. Coconut Oil is decidedly clever, and quite entertaining. If your sense oi of humor needs a massage, you should not miss reading this book. BREWER, WARREN & PUTNAM— $2.50. HOT NEWS Emile Gauvreau has written, in fiction form, the sensational story of tabloid journalism in an age symbolized by bootleg whiskey, insane journalism, and jazz. It is called HOT NEWS. Dealing with the powerful figures who initiated tabloid journalism, it gives the detailed, inside stories on how "hot" news was "made" and manipulated, and how weak but prominent personalities were exploited, frequently with tragic consequences. It relates the story of an editor, a slave of the age, who ceases considering human values and turns everything into "grist in the mill of Tab- loida." His existence is hectic and thrilling, devoted to feeding to the public all scandals, crime, and sex,— "not just news, but freak news, and HOT news" A fighting rival editor gives his life for the sake of increased circulation. Dominating", big-moneyed men battle for leadership in the newspaper field and in politics. Gangsters, chorus pirls, societv women, Big-Shots and Nobodies, all life and mere existence Puzzleitis Hear ye! Hear ye! All who suffer from that terrible brain rotting disease, "Puzzelitus". Here is a pill, a sure cure for your trouble, or at least a relief; and just like the "nattey medicine" you used to take for your sweet "muzzy wuzzy", you det turn tandy after it. Yes, sir, folks, and the candy in this case is something you all want, whether you say so or not; and that is your name in The Cougar. All that you have to do to attain this coveted goal is to swallow this pill successfully, and let it bring forth the required results, which you will in turn put in Mr. Birney's box, addressed to "Puzzelitus". If your results are correct, your name will be published (spelled most carefully) in this column of The Cougar. Everybody d is ikes mathematical puzzles, so being immune ta groans and howls, the first is of that typo, The owner of a 90-mile-an-hour speed boat raced it against a locomotive capable of running 80 miles an hour. For the; trial a track was cleared 200 miles along a river. An airplane traveling 150 miles an hour started at the same time as the boat and the locomotive. The boat had engine rouble, and when the locomotive reached the 80-mile mark, the boat was 10 miles behind it. From then on, the boat madei full speed. The airplane flew ahead of the boat five miles, and then back over the course until the boat had lessened the locomotive's lead to only five miles; after which the airplane flew back and forth above them until the boat was abreast of the locomotive, at which time the boat gave up and the race ended. How far did the airplane fly? I give you my word of honor (heh, heh, you don't know me) that this problem requires no algebra; so get to work and let's' have some solutions. The correct solution will be given in the next issue. scrambled and directed by wildly mad journalism. HOT NEWS is sensational, and it is exciting, interesting reading. THE MACAULAY COMPANY—$2.00. JOHN HENRY "I'm big and bad and six feet tall, and I comes f'm de Black River country whar de sun don't nevar shine . . " That's hot-blooded, restless, bragging John Henry, as presented by Roark Bradford in his new novel of negro life, JOHN HENRY. With hig usual power of insight and real understanding of the negro race, Mr. Bradford has delightfully interpreted John Henrys difficulties and habits. His experiences in "gittin' round NAwlins, rousting cotton and sugar on the Mississippi boats, and working on the Yellow Dog railroad are interesting and typical. He has plenty of trouble with his women. He visits the "ju-ju" woman, goes through the process of "gittin' religion," and finally "lays down his burden" with his cotton hook in his hand. The book is light and readable, with gross exaggerations, an abundance of low-down negro songs, humor, and a genial philosophy of life. If you are interested in rich, colorful stories of the negroes, you should enjoy JOHN HENRY. HARPER'S—$2.50. STUDENTS URGED TO USE JUNIOR COLLEGE LIBRARY "New Books Now Total 450," Says Mrs. H. Shearer, H.J.C. Librarian "We hope the students will use and enjoy the library much more than heretofore, and will not hesitate to call upon us to assist them in locating materia! for which they are searching." Thus Mrs. H. H. Shearer extends to the students her invitation to use the library. The shelves of the library have been constantly increasing. The new books received in the Junior college library now total 450. They have all been classified and are on the shelf ready for students' use. The books deal with a variety of subjects, but there are especially good biographies and dramatic criticisms. There is also an interesting collection of novels. Although tho college has accession to the high school library, there will be little need of using their books, as the college library is well supplied with interesting books dealing with practically every subject. The Junior college subscribes for 51 magazines, and the San Jacinto magazines are also being used by the college students. The daily papers received are The United Stales Daily, The New York Times, and The Houston Post-Dispatch, The Housion Post- Dispatch has been, sent complimentary to the library for four years. A new set of rules has been set up by the library committee and approved by Mr. Dupre. These rules will soon be mimeographed and distributed by the students. Quiet in the library is particularly urged. The students are requested to enroll in the library as soon as possible. There are 155 now enrolled, and over 245 books checked out for home reference during the first week, beginning September 28. There has been a steady withdrawal of books since then. There should be no anxiety on the part of the students for not finding the book needed as there are three assis-'" tans during each hour. The assistants are Aliyne Y. Allen, Marion Banta, Bernice Branum, lone Brown, Hulon Crawford, Louise Morgan, Zelda Osborne, Lewis Rueckert, Helein Tomlin, and Isabella Ventresca. I had my voice tried. What was the verdict? Fine! Were you able to pay it? BERTRAND NAMES SOPH COMMITTEE Jim Bertrand, newly elected president of the sophomore class, has appointed a council of seven class members to serve as charmen of committees which will formulate future activities of the class. The appointments have been approved by N. K. Dupre, assistant dean. The council Will consist of Bill Spit- Ier, Warren Lemon, Gladys Jacobs, Howard Graham, Nora Louise Calhoun, Harry D. Matthews, and Fred Aebi. Bertrand prefaced his appointment announcement with the remark that "when a group elects its president, it places the reputation of that group in his hands." Jim declared that with the aid of his council. Dean Dupre and the faculty, he expected to make this year's sophomore class the greatest in the history of the college. OFFICIAL BALLOT OF THE COUGAR BEAUTY CONTEST I hereby vote for: _Most Beautiful —Most Beautiful Name DROP IN CONTEST BOX IN OFFICE
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