Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931
File 002
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931 - File 002. November 18, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/49/show/46.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 18, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/49/show/46

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931 - File 002, November 18, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/49/show/46.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 2, November 18, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 2, November 18, 1931
Contributor
  • Conroe, Oscar
Date November 18, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR Houston, Texas Published THE COUGAR Of The Houston Junior College thly during the college year. Subscripti Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Assistant Editor News Editors Faculty Advisor Sports Feature - Established 1928 n, $1.00 per year. Oscar Conroe . Lucy Tailey Department Editors . Betty Covington, Adolph Marks F. R. Birney ...V. F. Harrison Lucille Cafcalas . Gladys Jacobs Verna German Humor - _: Literary _. Reporters Ruth Depperman, Harry Phillips, Myrta Ann Mersner, Mary Jane Fly, Patsy Inman, Wilma Lindsey, L. P. Marshall, Margaret Macey, Eugene Heard, Winona Phelps, Helen Higgins, James Julian. DEPRESSION DATES Girls, do you ever sit around and wonder why your favorite man never asks you for a date any more? If you gargle Listerine and use Lifebuoy, it must be because he's broken—or afraid he will be! Why not go into a huddle and vote for "depression dates"? It's great fun sitting on the old horsehair sofa looking at the family album—if you hold hands under the album. Let's give the boys a chance at depression rates on "depression" dates. What say, co-eds? COMPETITION Keen competition exists between the sophomores and the freshmen this year. The freshman class is a keen, active group. It ranks among the best oT the "fish" classes in the history of the school. It has already, on several occasions, shouted defiance in the upper- classmen's faces. However, in every case, the violators of the Sophomore Code were immediately reprimanded. The freshmen have been repulsed but not abstained; truly, they are a spirited and vivacious aggression. On the other hand we have the sophomores, staunch and steadfast, and unfaltering in carrying out their policy toward the freshmen. The upper-classmen are determined to place their subordinates in their proper places. The sophomores have an age-old tradition to uphold, that is, the upper-classmen shall always dominate. They go about their task with a keen sense of duty, as any freshman will readily testify. Most of the freshmen wear their caps, ties and suspenders, as is their duty; however, there are a few violators of the Sophomore Ordinance who will be sophs themselves next year, and will try to dominate the freshmen then. If you are not a good freshman now, how can you expect to be a good sophomore later? If you are incapable of receiving orders, you will never be qualified to give them. Be a good freshman this year and you can rest assured that you will make a better sophomore next year. PARLIAMENTARY LAW Directing a business meeting would be a comparatively simple task if both the leader and the members were well acquainted with parliamentary law. Ignorance of the rules and customs of a society is a heavy handicap to anyone who expects to influence the policy of the society. Every student in the Houston Junior college should be able to conduct a meeting according to the rules of parliamentary law. The leaders of our clubs and societies should have a good knowledge of such. They owe it to the members of the club or society of which they are an officer. The members should demand that their leader know the rules of order that will save them time and also make the meeting a peaceful one, It is very noticeable to anyone attending a meeting in the Houston Junior College that there has been a lack of training along these lines. We should realize our need of these rules and go about learning them. Then we shall be able to practice them. If some member of each English history, or public speaking class would make a speech to the class on parliamentary law, the movement might be encouraged. Some of the important laws are: 1. Only one question can be considered at a time. It must be put in the form of a motion, to be moved by one member and seconded by another, and must then be stated by the presiding officer, after which it is open to debate and amendment. 2. No one can make a motion or speak in debate until he has risen and addressed the presiding officer by his proper title and has been recognized" by him, and thus has obtained the floor. 3. No one can speak unreasonably long {over 10 minutes in ordinary societies), or more than twice on the same question on the same day, without permission of the assembly. 4. No member can speak a second time on the same question provided anyone desires to speak who has not spoken on that question. 5. No one in speaking can address his remarks to another member or use another's name when it can be avoided, but his remarks must be addressed to the presiding officer^ 6. When a question is once before the assembly it must be adopted or rejected by a vote, or be disposed of in some other way, before any subject can be introduced, except certain ones entitled to this privilege and which are therefore called privilege questions. SOPHOMORE CLASS MEETING A the regular meeting of the sophomore class, November 4, in room 201, Jimmie Bertrand, class president, appointed a committee to make a future report of bids from various orchestras and halls for the sophomore ball. Plans for a "sport dance", to be held sometime in December, were rejected by a unanimous vote of those present because it was thought that this would interfere with the freshman ball to be given on the 18th of that month. EXCHANGE Each month Junior college exchanges The Cougar with papers from Colleges in all parts of the United States. One of the papers shining before us this time is the "Herald", Arkansas State College paper. This is a snappy paper and the editorial page is especially good and forceful. Here are a few jokes from their "Joke Shop", too: Gladys Jacobs: It doesn't matter whether I wear chiffon or velvet: you like me just the same way, don't you? Howard Graham: Honey, I'll always love you through thick or thin. Lynn Galener: My sweetie just gave Grace Schollman: What the devil is that? L. G.: Oh, that's the kind that comes after a storm. Another paper we received was The College Star, from San Marcos. This is a good little paper; however, it does not satisfy the 'humor urge' of The Cougar readers. The Cat's Meow is a snappy column, but it is of interest Lo local readers only. Here is The Ark Light from Arkansas. It has several very attractive Teatures. 'It's a Fact' and 'Birthdays' are of special interest. If ail the Kansas high schools put out a paper like this one, here's to 'em! 'The Gagony Kolyum' says: Ruth Depperman: Don't tell anybody, but see this ring? Dan slipped it on my finger last night. Gladys Howard: Yes, it's nice looking, but it will make a black circle around your finger before you've worn it a week. It did on mine. Bill Seaman: "How is it that widows generally manage to marry again?" Jim Bertrand: "Dead men carry no tales." CLUBS Beauty Contest— (Continued from page 1) faces, then's when the tongues start waggin' and the hair pullin' begins. An' boys, you can get the low-down on any one of 'em from one source or another. All you gotta do is just keep your ears open, make out like you got a lot o' influence on the judges, an' not let any of 'em know which one you're gonna vote for. Listen, fellas, if you know any good lookin' women, all you gotta do is get ten people ta sign the nomination, an' she's a full fledged entrant. No money, no red-tape, just find the beauty, get the ten names signed to her name, an' well do the rest. I already know of three entrants, an' by the way, ye know It's funny but they're all brunettes, an' everyone of 'em has won a beauty contest at some time or another. There's Ruth Depperman, brunette. She won the All City contest in 1930. An' Wilma Lindsey was the All City beauty in 1931. I don't know much about Patsy Inman, but she's a good lookin' brunette. Whatsa matter with all these fair weath- dames (blondes.) Oh, yes, I was about to forget Melbadell Wright. She's a blonde, regardless of the fact that she .won the All City contest in 1929. Boy, oh, boy, I can't wait 'til this contest gets in full swing. The Cougar news hounds '11 scent more news than we'll have space to print. Anyway, we need sump'n to write about. Anyone desiring further information concerning this contest, see one of the three coun- cilmen, either the Kingfish, (Fred R. Birney), Brother Crawford, (V. F. Harrison,) or Andrew Brown, (Harry Phillips.) If you already know who ye're - goin' to vote for, clip the coupon on the bottom of page four and drap it in the "contest box" in ye olde office. Paul Gilder: Why do we use soap? Edgar Stokely: That's what I'd like to know. BENDER DRAMATIC CLUB The J. H. Bender Dramatic Club, sponsored by Mrs. L. T. Hooker, promises a varied program of entertainment this year. The club meets every other Monday night. Modern drama appreciation is studied at one meeting, alternating with a laboratory meeting devoted to advertising. The first meeting of the club was held October 26, when an election of officers took place. The following officers were elected: President, Christine Fitzgerald; first vice president, Gladys Jacobs; second vice president, R. Louis Higginbotham; secretary, Melbadell Wright; and treasurer, Kathryn Rullman. LIBRARY CLUB MEETING The Library club of the Houston Junior col'ege held its second monthly meeting of the new term Friday, November 6, at the home of Mrs. W. P. Hudgins. The following program was given: Beauty Triumphant — Ora Louise Morgan. Functions of the Junior college library—Marion Banta. So They Say—Nora Louise Calhoun. Report of the new non-fiction books .ecently received—Zelda Osborne. A Book—Allyne Allen. Report on the new flct'on books received—Lewis Reuckert. The new officers for the term are: Isabella Ventresea, president; Zelda Osborne, vice president; Allyno Alien, secretary; lone Brown, treasurer: Jeannette Willman, reporter. The executive board is studying the constitution and its by-laws, with the view of making possible changes in them. Following the program, a short social hour was enjoyed, during which refreshments were served. In addition to the monthly social meetings the members of the club dine every Friday evening in the Junior college cafeteria. They discuss the current problems of the library, thus making the staff more efficient. PUBLIC SPEAKING CLUB Thirty students of the Houston Junior college organized the second public speaking club Wednesday, October 21, with Harvey W. Harris as sponsor and coach. Officers elected were: Harry Mathews, president; Ervy Stephenson, vice president; Evelyn Hurvitz, secretary and reporter, and William Wander, serge ant-at-arm*. Charter members of the club are Mildred Bailey, Zelma Lee Bond, Violet Boyd, Evelyn Barshara, Opal Brown, Lucile Cafcalas, Luella Egg, Evelyn Rose Hurvitz, Florence Ken- drick, Jewell Mitcsell, Grace Schole- man, Nora Lee Watson, Jimmie Brink- ley, George W. Brownlee, Allen J. Carpenter, Melvin Femey, Paul Gilker, Eugene Heard, Dick Johnson, F. A. Lick, Edward McCannell, James C. Murph, Weldon Meddons, Harry Mathews, Richard Masfer, Hulma Page, B. W. Payne Jr., Weenona Phelps, J. C. Snyder, Cy H. Shaw, Edgar Stokely, William Wander, Ervy Stephenson, James Willard, and Irving Weinstein. Mr. Mathews appointed Opal Brown, J. C. Snyder, and Cy Shaw as a committee to submit appropriate names for the club at its next meeting. This club, in connecion with the Speakers' club recently organized, will form the Houston Junior College Oratorical association, which will act as host to visiting debating teams and dramatic organization. The association expects to function, as in the past, as judges for various debates of the interschelastic league in this district, and is now studying the new league question, "Resolved, That lobbying as generally practiced is detrimental to the best interests of the people." The Houson Junior college is renewing membership in the Texas Junior College Public Speaking association, and this club is expected to play an important part in state activities. COLLEGIAN GOSSIP Pajamas, a toothbrush, a few members of the faculty together with a few odds and ends, and the Cougar Collegians were off to Casa Del Mar to spend a glorious, or should we say, devilish week-end. As usual, the sophomores were led to believe that they were the brains of the outfit and the freshmen the goats. It didn't work. Oh, wi/Il admit the freshmen did do their share of "hopping", drying dishes, making beds and counting cobblestones from the top ol the hill to the pier, or rather listening to Eugenia Stevenson count them. Much to her disgust, Eugenia was forced by two fresnmen to count the steps and cobblesones back and forth. Was it 131, Eugenia, or 132? Lucy Tailey and Nora Louise Calhoun received a surprise, when after discovering a plate of dry crackers hidden by three freshmen, they poured water on them to quell any ideas Ihe three might have had with regard to putting crackers in the beds. But much to Lucys and Nora's disgust, along with that of about six other sophomores, after turning down the covers, they discovered wet, soggy crackers rolled up in the sheet. They found that it doesn't pay to interfere with the affairs of others, specially those of ireshmen. The freshhmen put on a rather cute itunt, that is, they put on their clothes oackwards, (more work of the sophomores), and sang a song. We then endured a pantomime that ihe sophomores offered. The cast included Handsome Harry (Nora Louise Calhoun), Wild Nell, the pet of the Plains (Rena Mai Butler), Lady Bede- >ere (Florene Davis), two Indian ;quaws (Helen Miggins, Elizabeth Kirbo). After a midnight supper, we all retired to the upstairs quarter, taking the remains of the supper with us. Pajamas were donned hurriedly, that is those who were able to procure their's in a hurry. Rena Mai had some difficulty in locating the bottom of hers, but after choking a couple of freshen, they finally were coughed up. A loud crash was heard about 3 a.m. After much excitement, five freshmen e seen creeping upstairs. The es have been asked to be withheld. The culprits claimed they were looking for ice water, but we have doubts. At any rate, after a second lunch, at 4 a.m. five sleepy girls, luding Pat Lesher, Francis Bates, Elizabeth Kirbo, Florence Davis, and last, but by no means the sleepiest, me, turned back the covers and did not awaken until Mrs. Bender aroused us all for breakfast. I thought I would never want to eat again, but the sight of scrambled eggs and coffee revived my appetite. Amid good-byes and tears (we really did hate to leave), the last handbags were thrown into Jhe 'jars and we started for home. Not having seen any males for a period of 24 hours, the sight of three in a Ford roadster caused Handsome Harry (Nora Louise) to get out her sixshooter (a wooden gun) and shoot the driver. The bullet (a strip of an inner tube) glazed the right ear of the target, causing the three men to pursue our car for some distance. After following us for some time, we finally succeeded, in "shaking" them and reached home safely. With a yawn and a sleep/ good-bye, I unloaded my handbacg from the car, and thus ended the party as far as I was concerned. HIT AND RUN DRIVER "hit and run" driver hit the fender of a new Chevrolet coupe parked front of the school on Holman Ave- e, Friday, October 23, and deliberately drove off before witnesses were to secure his number or an accurate description of his car. The fender of the coupe was bent considerably, but no other damages LOST BOOKS The following books were reported lost out of the library: Farrand's "Ba- of American History", which is the and volume of the American Nation and "Cowboy",iby Santee. Mrs. Shearer asks* the student body to help her in locating these two books . Should these books be found bring them to the library. Hugo Leaders: Somebody lend me a dime so I can pay these other two chumps.
File Name uhlib_10270243_v005_n002_002.jpg