Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933
File 004
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 004. May 24, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 24, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/43.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 24, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/43

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 004, May 24, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 24, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/43.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 12, May 24, 1933
Contributor
  • Marshall, L. P.
Date May 24, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript THE COUGAR CATALYSTS (By Blanche Dekle) Last term we studied about cat- callsalysts, substances which cause chemical changes without themselves being affected. (you know,—like moonlight.) Recently Dr. Jerome Alexander, a New York chemist, while speaking to the American section of the So- ciete de Chime Industrielle at Columbia University, stated that chemists may have in their hands the key to artificial life in the "catalysts," which are common in chemical industry. Dr. Alexander stated that if they once learn how to synthesize a self- reproducing catalyst the strain might be kept alive for years under laboratory conditions. However, he stated that this life would be very small, probably molecular size, and would not stand much chance of survival. LIGHT WITHOUT HEAT (By Jack Bush) It has been said that various scientific workers, both in this country and in Europe have attained a measure of success in the solution of a problem of enormous importance in the production of light without heat. In the ultra-modern tivities of the electrons, believed to be the ultimate particles of matter, that produce light waves. The electrons are believed to break away from their atomic moorings whenever the atoms are violently shaken about. But the only feasible way to produce the right kind of shaking has been thru the application of forces that invariably result in heating the substance from which light is to be emanated. This may be done mechanically, as by pounding a piece of iron until it is "red hot;" or chem- cally, as when we strike a match In everyday life one self-reproduc- Jand turn on the current to operate ing catalyst has been found in the the electric light bulb. gene. Genes are very small particles I But in each case there is a relative- about the size of one or two mole- ly tremendous expenditure of energy in the production of heat, which we perhaps do not wish to prodi whereas only a relatively small amount of the energy manifests itself in the light that we do wish to produce. Everyone knows that the firefly flashes brilliantly, justifying its col loquial name of lightning bug; while the glowworm gives an amazing imitation of a white-hot coal of fire; and that insects perform their spectacular feats without being burned, They are producing "cold" light, thus setting an example for the human inventor. It is precisely the example of these insects that the human inventors whose success is now reported have followed. The men of science have simply gone to school to the fireflies. They have made chemical examinations of the insect's cold- light lantern, and have endeavored, by processes not yet fully revealed to the public, to reproduce in the laboratory a certain organic sub stance that appears always to bt present in the bodies of self-luminous insects of every type. cules and exist in every living being. Dr. Alexander also stated that life is thought to have originated on this earth in the form of "biouts," which are very similar to genes. These "biouts" were probably formed by the grouping of atoms. By reproducing itself, one of these "biouts" through millions of years, is able to change into more complex forms of life such as exist today. The well known chemist closed his speech in pointing out how science and the book of Genesis are related to one another. First, the earth was formed from an original chaos, second, the land and the waters were formed; third, the appearance on land of herbs, grass, and trees .and of living creatures in the waters. Following these came the fowls of the air and the beasts on the land. Man came last. BOILING A KETTLE ON ICE This seeming miracle is readily understood when it is explained that the kettle contains liquid air instead of water. Air becomes liquid only when its temperature is greatly reduced. By comparison, frozen water (ordinary ice) is a warm substance. "Heat is a term we apply to molecular activity. The molecular movements suffice to push neighboring molecules, and thus give to them motion which we term 'temperature. When the temperature of a substance rises to a certain level (under uniform conditions of pressure) the substance changes from solid to liquid; or from liquid to gas. The heat transmitted through the bottom of the kettle from the ice suffices to raise the temperature of the liquid air to the volatilizing point, so the kettle "boils," though it remains intensely cold." Debators— Continued from page 1 most beautiful girls to be found but that the young men who inhabit this institution also rate in handsomeness. Pat Foley was given as an example. Esther Tejml and Evelyne Bashara debated the affirmative of the same question against the Beaumont girls and the judges gave the decision two to one in favor of the negative. CHEMIST SETTLE DUST Every year, road dust exacts a large toll in the form of accidents, due to dust clouds at curves, intersections, and other dangerous points. Thousands of roadside homes are made extremely uncomfortable. To correct these conditions, many communities are using a comparatively new method of treatment, known as the calcium chloride treatment. Calcium chloride is supplied for roaddust prevention, in the form of small white flakes which, when spread over the surface of the road, begin immediately to absorb moisture ROBINSON SCORES K.O. OVER HOLT IN BOXING BOUT LEROY MELCHER SERVES AS PROMOTER Smartt Beats Foley LARGE CROWD TURNS OUT TO WITNESS BOUTS Boxing has held the limelight in Junior College sporting circles for the past several weeks due to the enthusiastic manner in which the students have accepted the sport. Le Roy Melcher, matchmaker and promoter, boasts two successful exhibitions to his credit. The first matches were witnessed by a large crowd who cheered the puglistic efforts of the eight gladiators. The feature of the program was Robinson-Holt fiasco with Robinson winning a technical k. o. in the second when Holt was unable to continue. The round and a half that the battle lasted was thrill-full and exciting, but Hampie's superior ring generalship tided him over to victory. In another thriller Ed Smartt took Pat Foley into camp. When these mastodons of maul pitted their best efforts against each other it brought the crowd to their feet shouting for blood. The climax came in the second when Smartt floored Foley, but for no count. In the last bout of the evening James Julian won over Jules Delam- bre. The curtain raiser was the Stal- lings-Boilin affair. Both boys were evenly matched—a fact that caused them to battle evenly for three ounds. Ben Young served capably as ref- Harriet Allen Wins Title of Jr. College's Most Beautiful Girl In the election of the most beautiful and the most popular girls to represent the Junior College at thi sixth anuual reception to high school graduates, Harriet Allen and Lucille Black, sophomores, were selected over their four rivals. Candidates for the election were Harriet Allen and Lucille Black, sophomores; Mary Bradley Tuma and Mary Stevenson, freshmen; and Ed- ris O'Neal and Joyce Gillette, representing the Student Association. Miss Allen and Miss Black were hostesses at the reception, and were presented to the guest with the high school beauties and popularity winners. The Junior College representatives, however, were not eligible for the election of the queen of the reception. WOW lady stepped from the Santa Fe train at a side station a special top order. To the only man in ight she asked: "When is the train for Houston due here, please?" "The train went an hour ago, ma- am; the next one is tomorrow at eight o'clock." The lady in perplexity then asked, "Where is the nearest hotel?" "There is no hotel at all," replied the man. "But what shall I do," asked the lady. "Where shall I spend the "I guess you'll have to stay all ight with the station agent," was the reply. 'Sir!" flashed the lady. "I'd have you know I'm a lady." Well," said the man as he strode , "so is the station agent." from the air, continuing the process until the surface appears to have had a light rain. Unlike rain, however, this moisture remains for weeks and in some cases months, binding the loose dust into a moist, smooth, durable surface. A second, though equally important, advantage is that considerable money is saved in maintenance, as the road surface stays where it belongs, instead of blowing over the surrounding countryside. ALMEDA PHARMACY, Inc. "Your Drug Store" Holman and LaBranch H-819-1 WHITE CAFE FAMOUS FOR SIZZLING STEAKS "Tender as a Mother's Love" S14 Travis F-9440 MAJESTIC STARTING SATURDAY RUTH CHATTERTON LILY TURNER KIRBY NOW SHOWING Carole Lombard in 'SUPERNATURAL' with Randolph Scott H. B. WARNER VIVIAN OSBORN STARTS SAT. "Girl in 419" JIMMIE DUNN GLORIA STUART JULES DELAMBRE SCORES WIN OVER BATTLING RUFTS RENFRO SCORES WIN OVER STALLINGS IN FAST BOUT Smartt-Green Draw LEON GREEN SHADES PAT FOLEY By making a strong come-back in the last round of his fight, Jules Delambre was able to turn back his tough adversary—Slim Rufts. The first round found Delambre an the receiving end of a shower of punches, but. he was able to come back in the last round and hand the slugging Rufts a drubbing. Harold Renfro scored a win over Bob Stallings in the second bout on the card. Stallings set a fast pace early in the fight and found little trouble in avoiding Renfro's right, but as the battle waxed old, Harold was able to land at will. Renfro's strongest point of attack was a fast ight hook. It was with this weapon that he knocked Stallings out of the ring in the last round. Smartt and Starks Green, heavies, fought a cautious three round draw. Both boys were unable to open up due to the fact that the other might clout him into a harp solo. In the most comical bout of the evening, Leon Green repulsed the murderous attack of Pat Foley. The South End powerhouse chased Green 11 over the gym, and at the end of hree rounds had failed to land a ingle blow. A small crowd turned out to wit- ess the bouts. 'ae LvzerpreTctxioia SOITHI R\ HOSPITALITY Here you may entertain for the girl graduate in the finest fashion—and in the most inexpensive way. Bridge teas, luncheons, dances and afternoon parties may be arranged, suitable to any number of guests. In entertaining at the Lamar you are freed from the trouble and inconvenience of entertaining at home. May we suggest that you call the Lamar for further information about this service? MRS. MERLE H. WATSON, Social Executive LAMAR HOTEL Bruce Carter management
File Name uhlib_10270243_v006_n012_004.jpg