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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 002. May 24, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/41.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 24, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/41

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 002, May 24, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/41.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 12, May 24, 1933
Contributor
  • Marshall, L. P.
Date May 24, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR STAFF Editorial Editor L. P. Marshall Advising Editor Jimmy Julian Associate Editor C. W. Skippe: Managing Editor A. Marks Faculty Advisor F. R. Birney Departmental Exchange Frances Nesmith Humor Bob Stallings, Elmer Hamilton News John Hill, Jesse Darling Feature Mesta Waggoner Literary Evelyn Coffey, Milton Gregory Sports Richard Macfei Business Business Manager Minnie Topek Assistant Business Manager Libbye Lewis Reporters Elizabeth King, Cortis Lawrence, Flossie White, Tommie Cooksey, Isabel McDaniel, Mrs. Ruby Britton, Max Cohen, Nell Wade, Mary Elizabeth Horan, Ethel Falk. SOCIAL LIFE AT H. J. C. On looking back over the functions sponsored by the Houston Junior College during the past year, it will be noted that practically every type of activity had a place on the school's social calendar. Topping the list of social functions were the dances. During the past year twelve (Lances were given under the supervision of the college. Of this number, two were receptions for new students, one was the annual reception honoring high school seniors, the Student's Association sponsored another of this number, and three more were given by either the sophomore or freshman classes. A conservative estimate will show that approximately 4000 persons were entertained on these 12 occasions. Debate and dramatics held their share of attention by engaging in a busy year. Junior College debators boast the record of only one defeat for the entire year, while the Bender Dra- motic club won praise by enacting four plays of various lengths. The athletic field is the one that the school is most proud of, due to the many events carded and the large number of participating students. Hockey, volley ball, tennis boxing, swimming, football, indoor base ball, basketball, archery, and golf are the sports that were enjoyed by students in the past year. 0 THE WAY OUT At the present time we hear and read various proposals suggesting ways out of our present situation. Only too many of these so-called solutions have failed to grasp the real problem and consequently, they cannot bring about reform, even though they may be partly correct. Since the founding of the United States, we have made only one real reform in our civilization. We have reformed our governmental life and policies without bringing a corresponding change in our institutional and economic life. This fact is the real cause of our present social problems. Governmental life has to do with control by law, and we have made the necessary changes in this phase of our society. Institutional life concerns control by forms and attitudes. But here we have failed to make the necessary, reforms. Instead, we have kept the worn- out rituals and philosophies that were prevalent several cen- tures ago. Likewise, our economic life has not changed for hundreds of years. We have allowed Industrialism to rule us when it has been worn out for years and years. In order for complete reform to be brought about, we must accomplish change in these three branches of our civilization. President Roosevelt has grasped the situation and has set about to remedy conditions. But whether he will be successful in his program remains to be seen. If he is able to obtain the support of Congress in all of his policies, America seems destined to enter a new regime. 0 ROOSEVELT MESSAGE President Roosevelt's recent message to the nations of the world is one of the greatest steps that has yet been made toward disarmament and world peace. Yet, unless all of the major powers agree with our president, this move is doomed to the failure of past attempts to outlaw war. Probably one of the greatest obstacles the proposal will meet will be the attitude of the American people. Since the infant days of our republic there has been a tradition against entering into foreign paets and treaties. No doubt, this attitude was correct when Washington warned the country to keep out of entangling European alliances. But today, we are living in a different period and there is great need of adjustment to present conditions instead of clinging tenaciously to time-worn tradition. With the passing of the world frontier, it is impossible to maintain a policy of isolation successfully, and still make progress. There is a crying need for internationalism today, such as there has never been before. But America has failed to meet this need and has suffered disastrous consequences. We have gone "money-mad" and have overlooked the real needs of a progressive society. Until we put aside prejudices and overlook propaganda, we will continue to be maladjusted. Mr. Roosevelt's proposal is a step in the right direction. SENIORS IN WILD ESCAPADE-ORIS IT JUST FANCY Lis'en to me. This is the sad tale of the senior's GOULD-bye. They went to the WOOD for a picnic. There they found an old MILLS stream so they decided to have lunch. All the girls wore COTTEN and the boys wore BLACK shirts. Jahnke and Hamilton gathered WOODRUFF to build a bon- LINDSEY and ESLINGER spread a cloth for lunch. Everybody sat down to MUNSON, mean munch their eats. SCHULTZ took a PAGE from a book and read. SNIDER is a VENTRASCO, (you know ventriloquist), he made doggone good noise. Everybody sure did STAUFFER their tomaehes with all those good eats. OBERMILLER and RABINOWITZ gave a toe dance and, boy was it good? It just lifted up all our MOR- RALLS, oh yea morales. About this time RILEY and JENSEN staged a fight. The RENFRO, that's it referee, called it a draw. AEBI and DOUGLAS broke down tree and a farmer chased them away. He said he would let them go SCOTT-free if they would pay MACFEE or some such fee. STEVENSON said it seemed like a MASON should be able to patch up the tree. JOHNSON and JOHNSON acted as the gold dust twins and boy they KENDRICK. I mean they can kick, BASHARA and ESTES took the job of STEWART and made every body eat all their crumbs. They said the coffee was good to the LATHROP, yes, last-drop. HARRIS and JULIAN needed a shave and they wished someone had a GILLETT so they could scrape their mugs. ETHEREDGE and NESMITH told ghost stories and gee they never even BATES an eye during all the scary time. WILLIAMS tried to be bo precise, but FOLEY tickled her ear with a ROBINSON said there might be poor folks but a MORGAN never could. CALHOUN said lets MCJUNKIN, you know, make junk of all that stuff, and go home. So the party ended in a nice quiet riot. THANK YOU. J. C. Benefits— Continued from page 1 Survey of English literature, elements of economies, comparative European government, United States government, child psychology, general methods in high school teaching, high school practice teaching, elementary school teaching, methods in public school music, intermediate grades, introduction to sociology, and special feature article writing. The summer term will open on June 5 and last for six weeks, including hour and a half classes, five days per week. This will be the seventh annual summer session of the Junior College. Summer School— Continued from page 1 gin Wednesday, June 7th. Registra-j tion days are Monday, June, 5th, and Tuesday, June 6th. The late registration fee of $2.50 will be charged after Tuesday, June 6th. There will be but one term of six weeks. Both freshman and sophomore subjects will be offered with other courses given if there is sufficient demand. And (they say) the Scotch lad married that crazy gal because she was half-off. Our CoiUgeCu^eOQvjs BY EVELYN COFFEY Modern College Life as the Movies Describe It Up at ten and amid the luxurious surroundings of my room, leisurely dressing and selecting appropriate attire from my wardrobe of twenty some odd suits. To class in my twelve cylinder roadster. Lunch with Babe and thence for a drive. Rt turned for tea at the Theta House. Dropped over to stadium in time for the third quarter fo the game and hurriedly changed into uniform scoring the winning touchdown and was carried on shoulders of excited mob. Dinner and dancing with Sue and then for a drive during which I proposed and was accepted. So to Lake Charles to be married, and home to bed. ACCORDING TO THE REFORMER Awoke at eleven with brown taste and headache. Took another eye- opener. Slept thru two classes. Took another eye-opener. Slept for an hour. Went to cocktail party. Went to dinner. Went to joint. Went to crap game. Went after date. Went after drink. Went to roadhouse. Went to bed. Went to hell. AS IT REALLY IS— Up at seven and put on sock: which are standing in corner. Went to class from eight to twelve. Went to lunch. Went to library. Studied till five. Went to dinner. Went to library. Went nuts. REQUESTS If I could ask of Santa Claus A gift worth while, I'd like to find within my stoekng, please, ■. Harris' smile. And if a gift you'd leave for me To make my heart rejoice, Please let me have for just one hour Miss Thomason's lovely voice. QUEER PEOPLE THESE CHINESE The Chinese can't understand why the Americans boil water to make :heir tea hot, put ice in it to make t cold, lemon to make it sour, and sugar to make it sweet. Again the clever Chinese question ir intelligence concerning the old Chinese custom of putting food the grave of the departed. We t "When will your departed friend come up to eat the food?" The ans- is, "at the same time that your friends will come up to smell the flowers." THOUGHTS WHILE ADDICTED Oh, how I'd like to rise to puissant and glcrious heights and bathe jthe following paragraphs in poetry. [The nearest I can come to it is to that Wilma Jeanne Lindsey looked like a Dresden figure t'other night at the reception, wearing quite the perfect-est blue organdie frock seen in many a day. After hearing #en Young sing "And My Little Birdie, She Flew Away," I feel assured that he must be a robust singer in the bath tub. One phrase description of Jimmie Brinkley—free and easy. Have you heard Leroy Melcher play (?) "The Worms Crawl In, The Worms Crawl Out," on his toy horn? SUMMARY SHOWS H.J.C. HAS MANY SOCIAL EVENTS Although the year of 1932-33 has been very trying, it has failed to down the enthusiasm of students of the Junior College, and traditions and activities have been carried on. The semi-annual receptions for freshmen students held in fall and spring terms were successful in giving the new students a hearty wel- Compiling of the Cougar Directory was carried out by the Cougar Collegians each term and sold to students for 15 cents each. The Dramatic club put in good work and gave the students two fine performances each semester. The forming of the Guild Savant ; a men's club has been hailed as a successful move. The Cougar Collegians have carried on with vim and vigor. Our Men's Glee Club can boast with pride of a happy singing year, as they mastered composition technique and yet enjoyed each meeting to its limit. The Debating Club showed up in splendid training at each debate. Study and thought was given to every word. Junior College's annual reception for High School Seniors was a success and spread good will to all the high schools. The Outdoor Club had a happy year to add to their account. The Library Club had many social ffairs and business meetings that added to the school life and learning. Sport activities and many other ents all point to a year well spent. ARCHERY CONTEST NOW UNDER WAY Archery enthusiasts began their annual tournament last Monday at 6 p. m., according to Miss Irene Spiess, instructor. "The competition will be by classes and individuals. The three highest ranking individuals from the three highest scored classes will play the run-off, and the winner from these will receive an H. J. C. Pennant, she said. Among those showing skilled ability in archery are Clara Tailey, Frances Nesmith, Dorothy Golden, Avis Parks, Esther Baebel, Lucille Waite and Eleanor Scarborough." Miss Spiess also announced that classes are held every day in the week beginning at 5 p. m. and anyone enrolled in gym is eligible for entrance in the contest. Press Banquet— Continued from page i with the reiteration of the ideals and aims of teaching journalism in the public schools. Mr. Harry McCleary, news editor for the Houston Press, representing committee of newspapermen who selected the best senior paper, explained the strong points of the several high school papers submitted to i judged in the contest. Senior awards were announced by Mr. J. 0. Webb, director of high schools. Clever musical numbers by high school students interspersed the evening's program and gave added charm to the affair. Time Will Tell— Continued from page 1 of classes, they think it is a patrol wagon, and walls can't hold them." P.S. This was written in the city jail. Chief Dupre was wrong. It WAS the patrol wagon.
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