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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 001. May 24, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/40.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 24, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/40

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933 - File 001, May 24, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/44/show/40.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 12, May 24, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 12, May 24, 1933
Contributor
  • Marshall, L. P.
Date May 24, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript FAREWELL THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE Volume VI HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 1933 Elaine Richardson Crowned As Senior Reception Queen Annual Affair For Seniors Draws 2000. Elaine Richardson, Sam Houston High School beauty, was elected queen of the sixth annual Houston Jr. College reception Friday night, May 5, honoring Houston high school graduates. The contest was the closest in the history of the reception, only six votes separating Miss Richardson and her nearest rival, Ellen Newman of San Jacinto. The queen was selected by a standing vote after the candidates from each school had been presented by Jimmy Brinkley, president of the Junior College Student Association, and Harry Gray, president of the freshman class of Junior College. The most beautiful and the most popular girls from each school and the vote for the election of the queen of the reception follows: Ellen Newman, 237, and Mary Gray Adams, 37 San Jacinto; Elaine Wade, 75 and Maurine Mayfield, 4, Milby; Elaine Richardson, 243, and Billy Lathy, il, Sam Houston; Dorothy Winn, 30, and Bernice Nicholson, 26, Jefferson Davis; Doris Meacham, 96, and Mary Ellen Triplett, 40, John H. Reagan. Harriet Allen and Lucille Black. Junior College representatives, were hostesses of the reception and were not eligible for election. Other special high school representatives, including valedictorians, senior class presidents, and most representative boys and girls, were: William Schleeter, J. G. Martel, Frank Smith, and Jean Slater, San Jacinto; Kazko Arai, Ethel Belle Stettner, Jim Allen, and Helen Marques, Milby; Maurice Belt, John Brandenberger, and Mary Margaret Hurley, Sam Houston; Leonora Elliot, Claude Gresham, Courtney Continued on page 3 J.C.B0YDEBAT0RS SCORE WIN OVER LAMAR COLLEGE The boys debate team of the Houston Junior college won a decision over the visiting boys' team of the Lamar Junior College Beaumont at their annual meet and final debate of the season Monday night, May 15, the school auditorium. Debating the current question of e cancellation of the inter-allied war debts, Tommie Cooksey and Marshall, Junior College team, defended the negative. A spirit of heated animation reigned throughout the debate while both teams made realistic demands and refusals and told the audience how their opponents should have handled that side of the question. Beaumont debate coach, Mrs. F. W. Fonville, and her boys' and girls' debate teams arrived in Houston late Monday afternoon and were guests at a banquet arranged by the public speaking department in honor of the occasion. Armond Caste- vens, president of the Houston Junior College Speaking Club, presided as toastmaster and heard after dinner speeches welcoming the Beaumont visitors and discussing the past friendship of the two colleges. Dean N. K. Dupre admonished Junior College debators not to let the Beaumont representatives take home too many spoils while Mrs. Bender made it clear that not only does the Houston Junior College have the Continued on page 4 Press Association Held Meeting For Annual Banquet Pictured above is Miss Elaine Richardson, Sam Houston High beauty who was recently crowned queen of the 1933 H. J. C. high school reception. Graduates Plan For Lake Shore Picnic to Be Held May 27 The graduating class of Junior College of '33 have selected Clear Lake as the site of Its annual picnic to be held Saturday, May 27. This event will begin at 2 p. at the summer home of Alma Stewart, and will be followed by dancing and swimming until late into the night. Miss Stewart will be the hostess to 47 graduates and their dates. It has been decided by the class that all graduates may have outside dates if they choose. The committee on entertainment composed of La Verne Lathrop, Nora Louise Calhoun, Fred Aebi, Weiss Obermiller announced that all those interested in tennis, swimming, dancing, or base ball, will be assured of a good time. All graduates and girls without dat*3 are urged to see Pat Foley about the arrangement of transportation. Mack Douglas has pledged himself to furnish music for the occasion. SUMMER SESSION TO BEGIN JUNE 5 "We expect more students in the Houston Junior College summer school of 1933 than in any previous year," N. .K. Dupre, dean said in interview recently. "Our reputation as an institution of higher learning existing right in our own city, is growing yearly. Due also to the fact that many parents want their children to remain under home influences for a two years, we have an opportunity to extend untold benefits to the people of Houston and vicinity," he pointed out. Classes for the summer term be- Continued on page 2 JUNIOR COLLEGE BENEFITS SHOWN TO HIGH SCHOOLS Students in the Houston senior high schools will hear talks on the value and necessity of college education in meetings to be conducted this week and next. These addresses are being given in conjunction with the Houston school district's drive to boost the value to the community of the Houston Junior College, by extending its ad- ntages to many other persons shing to improve their education. "The principals in the senior high: pecially are urged to give em phasis to the need for students to continue their education and to the opportunities afforded by the summer school term, opening June 5. The instruction is given by the regular members of the faculty, and the courses are equivalent in content and value of those given during the regular session," Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, president of the college, said. Freshmen courses to be offered as announced by Dean N. K. Dupre are: Rhetoric and English composition, plane trigonometry, plane analytical geometry, European history, chemistry, physics, news writing and editing, German, French, Spanish, psychology of learning, elementary methods of education, health education, public school music, elementary art teaching, and methods of teaching writing. Sophomore courses announced are Continued on page 2 Writing Ideals Are Stressed At Meeting. TIME WILL TELL A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE BY C. W. SKIPPER The annual banquet of the Houston High School Press Association given May 2 at the Y. W. C. A. Almost 200 young journalists and their sponsors attended. Eugene Sisk, president of the H. H. S. P. A., presided, and after a few well-chosen remarks introduced the various speakers. Mr, F. R. Birney, instructor in journalism in the city schools, was the first presented. He gave a short resume of the purposes of the press clubs and their yearly get-to-gether banquet. Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer .superintendent of city schools, made an interesting talk on the ideals of the school newspapers. "The printed word should carry more than a message. I believe training in journalism has greater value than being able to write an interesting headline or arrange a front-page make-up. In my opinion you are being trained to acquire a broader vision of life rather than how to become successful newspaper writers," declared Dr. Oberholtzer. Mrs. Bess Whitehead Scott of the Houston Post spoke in an interesting on the literary style of newspaper interviews. Mrs. Ruby D. Brittain gave a brief account of the method used by Houston Junior College journalism students in grading the junior high papers. The winners in the junior high class were announced by Mr. Birney, who prefaced his announcement Continued on page 2 I returned to my old Alma Mater two yeara after graduation to find that the entire college was changed. In the first place, a sign at the front entrance proclaimed the school be "The Houston Junior College for Crime." Well, it hasn't changed much," I said to myself, remembering some of the students who attended at the time I was there. The next change I noticed was the door at the front of the building. It had a sliding panel that opened after a person knocked three times. After you were identified, you would be admitted through the portals into the sacred chambers of the school The first person to greet me was former Dean Dupre, now Chief Du He beamed at me and pointed around the building with pride. "Do you know," he said with ar air of importance, "that our graduates have received a higher rating as public enemies than any other college in the country?" "That's great," I said, "but tell me, why did you change this from a regular academic college to a crime school?" "That's easy. There are so many criminals that we thought it would be fine if we offered a course in i We next went to the auditorium thus helping the poor erim- where a quartette was giving a r, inals who have had no schooling andlber. are always getting caught. As as we started this course, all of our students dropped their other courses and majored in crime. Then we had to change it to a crime college." We are passing by the cafeteria hen we heard an explosion. "What was that?" I demanded. "Oh, that's just one of the pine- >ples exploding in the kitchen, or might be some of our rivals pay- g us a visit from the Rice Crime Institute. I think they are sore because we bumped off their chief last week. Can you imagine the un- sportsmanship of those guys ? Why, only last week they expelled some of their best footpads for cheating on their machine gun examinations. It seems that they put magnets in the targets and shot steel bullets.' We passed the gymnasium where several students were going through some setting up exercises. "What are they doing?" I asked Chief Dupre. "Oh. they are developing their muscles. They are majoring in the muscle-in racket." Those," said the chief with pride, are the Sing-Singers. They broadcast over a national crook-up every night. I then pointed to some girls who were passing with their noses high in the air. They look stuck up to me,' I commented. 'Certainly, They are some of our best stick-up artists." Well., who are those students watching that man lying under the blanket ? " 'Oh," replied Chief Dupre, "they are learning how to tell under-cover men when they see them." Suddenly a bell began to clang. Students piled out of the rooms and dashed down the halls. Some even jumped out of windows. The chief and I were knocked down in the rush. "That's one habit that I have never been able to break them of/' Chief Dupre smiled apologetically as he dusted himself off. "Whenever they hear the bell denoting the end Continued from page t Bud Steeger Wins Re-Election in Boys Guild Savant Club Bud Steegar, president of the Guild Savant, was re-elected president of the organization for next year, at a special meeting of the club, Wednesday, May 10. The remaining officers for next year will be named in September. The club extended Steeger a vote of confidence and thanks for his efforts in building-up the new organization during the past year. Steeger pledged himself to continued action in the next year's activities of the club. for a party at Clear Lake shores on Saturday, May 20, were drawn up at this meeting. Arrangements were placed in the hands of e entertainment committee. H. W. Harris extended the thanks of the faculty to the club for its help in ushering at the high school reception. "The Guild Savant is due a vote of gratitude for the manner in which it handled the ushering at the recent reception," Mr. Harris said. "The vote counting was very successful in the hands of this club, and I hereby express the thanks of the faculty to you for your able assistance."
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