Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 2, October 26, 1932
File 003
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 2, October 26, 1932 - File 003. October 26, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 15, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/34/show/32.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 26, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 2, October 26, 1932 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/34/show/32

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 2, October 26, 1932 - File 003, October 26, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 15, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/34/show/32.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 2, October 26, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 2, October 26, 1932
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date October 26, 1932
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR PAGE THREE AIR MINDED STUDENTS ARE OFFERED COURSE Here we are back again in this issue with more news and ideas about our aviation classes. Since last writing, there has been many new developments in favor and against our presenting a course in practical flight and theoretical study of aviation. The first of last week your editor, through the courtesy of Mrs. Bender, wrote to the University of Cincinnati asking for information concerning the course in aviation they have been presenting for the last eight or nine "years. This school was the first to offer this course, so it would be practical and of great benefit to us in presenting our course if we could have their help in our planning. We have not heard from them as yet, but sure that they will be only too glad to help in any way they can. Assistant Dean Dupre is very much In favor of this course, so he has stated, if enough students are interested. So do not wait! Sign up immediately ,in the office if you are interested. There is no "red tape" attached to this signing. It is merely a survey t< see if there might be enough peopli interested in such a course. You do obligate yourself to take this course by signing. Some of the latest items that have * been of notice in the aviation world during the past month were set up at the air races held in Cleveland, . Ohio, during the last month. To begin with, Jimmie Haizlip started the races by winning the Bendix Derby (a race, not a hat), flying from Los Angeles to New York in the time of ten hours and twenty minutes. He flew We dell-Williams racer. Jimmie Doolittle established a r world's speed record for land planes when he exceeded 296 miles per hour, thus winning the Thompson Trophy i race. Many foreign aviators attended the races, representing England, Portugal Poland, Italy, Germany, and France. Many new planes made their maiden appearance during these race. of which are: Gee Bee, the plane used by the winner of the Thompson ' Trophy; Wedell-Williams, second place in the Thompson race; Bennie Howard's Racer was a great attrac- - tion because of new construction lines (Bennie is a former Houston lad); Hall's Racer contains many new ideas in speedship, but because of wing struts which cause a great deal of • resistance, he was unable to make a showing. These races are held annually and are really a proving ground for new ideas in aeronautical circles. !!DON'T forget to sign!! Gohlhe Sister's Singing Is Reminiscent of Bosivell^ Sister Harmony, Vocal Trio The Boswell Sisters of Houston, alias Mae and Daisy Lee Gohlke, proved to the studen'i that assembly isn't such a bad place U go, when they rendered "Moonlight on the River," and encored with "Dinah" at the auditorium period Wednesday, October 12. The Gohlke sisters have appeared on the Majestic Theater stage twice this summer, sang at the Firemen's Frolic with accompaniment of the1 Houstonian orchestra, and will sing for the World War Veteran Program formerly scheduled for October 20, that has been postponed to a later date. Radio listeners of South Texas shouli be familiar with their voices, as the; have broadcast over radio stations KXYZ and KTRH of Houston, and WOAI, KTSA, and KTAP of San An- At the present time they are broadcasting over KXYZ each Saturday their own program, and with the program presented by Mrs. John Wesley Graham's pupils on the same day. STARTS FRIDAY IT SIZZLES CLARK GABLE JEAN HARLOW IN M-G-M'S "RED DUST" at LOEWS AN EXCLUSIVE LOEW HIT Mack Douglas, 0 The Cougar. In your last column you stated I was snobbish because I wouldn't speak to you. I am not a highbrow because I won't speak to you—but I would be a lowbrow if I did. Sourly, Virginia Cotton. Mr. Fred R. Birney, Houston, Texas. Attention has been called to the fact that you would make an ideal picture for our "Nature in the Raw" series. With two days growth of beard on your face, we are confident that your picture would scare the public into buying our igarettes. Yours truly, Lucky Strike Tob. Co. Donald "Suitcase" Aitken, Dear sir: Fires have been playing havoc with the grazing lands on the west Texas plains, and unless we can combat this menace our cattle may starve for the lack of grass. But, with you in the neighboring re gions we are quite positive that the grass fires would not have a chance. We are willing to give you a job, because anybody with feet the size of yours can stomp out fires at the rate of ten acres per minute. Respectfully, West Texas C. of C Mr. John Hill, Junior College. In viewing your past records, we have decided that you are the logical contender to meet Bill Goggan for the paperweight intercollegiate penny. matching championship. Should you promise to train faithfully and should you be able to make ihe weight limit of 140 lbs., we shall be glad to consider you as an opponent :o Champ Goggan. Pugilistically yours, Madison Square Garden Corp. Mr. Harold Renfro, Houston, Texas. Dear sir: Our comedian, Ed Wynn, is ill. We do not wish to discontinue our radio broadcast, so we are appealing to you. Of course, we realize you are not funny, but in havng you on the program it would be in ke&ping with Mr. Wynn's idea of "The Perfect Fool." Foolishly yours, The Texaco Company. To Kitty Hurlock: Knowing you are the Ninon de Len clos of Junior College's history with innumerable lovers, we beg of you to accept a contract for pictures at your own price. Garbo's going to Sweeden, and Harlow's maritial adverses have left openings that only you could fill. Lovingly yours, M. G, M. Studios. Coach French, Director of Athletics, H. J. C: Due to the impressive record cor piled by your Fighting Cougars on the gridiron, I would, indeed, be pleased to book a game with your team. Due to the large drawing power of your team, the game could be played Yankee Stadium, and we can make you a flat guarantee of $500,000. Your old football pal, Hunk Anderson, Coach, Notre Dame College. To all J. C. Students: You all should welcome the news that we have decided to sponsor a dance for J. C. students every night. The Rice Roof has been obtained and Guy Lombago and his Royal Canopen ers have been booked to furnish music. It was approved that money should be spent to buy every girl an evening dress, and every boy a tuxedo. Yellow Cabs will be furnished to facilitate the transportation problem. Yours for a hot-cha time, The School Board. Professor Miner, inior College. 1 must warn you, professor, that I have received complaints stating you have lessoned the amount of work required of history students. The rumors are that-you are so lax in your re- Girls Organize to Aid u Junior College Activities Members of the Play-Girls club held meeting last Monday afternoon primarily to elect officers. The following were elected to hold office for the ensuing term; president, Mary Lou Gaines; vice president, Nelda Smith; secretary, Ruth Depperman; treasurer, Lula Grace Kellogg. It was decided that the next meeting would be held a week from the following Tuesday morning, at the home of Lula Grace Kellogg. The club plans to promote dances, and social affairs in the near future for the students of Junior College. COUGAR SCIENTIST STAFF Editor-in-Chief Evelyn Cochran Chemistry Editor __ Blanche Dekle Biology Editor Mollie Schimmel Humor Editor Lillian Schwartz Class Representatives Jack Blackburn, Joe Bandera. Sponsor S. L. Bishkin Cougar Scientist This ticket selling business is no all its cracked up to be. You, perhaps, have already learned as much! The other day we dropped in on a prominent lumber man, prepared to impress him with our proposition, and collect our dollar. We were graciously received and shown to his office. He made a very aloof impression sitting behind his mahogany desk, and we were almost afraid to speak, but we remembered Mr. Harris' speech, and gave our little spiel. The business man was impressed. He looked as if he was weakening. "And just think," we continued, "the Houston Junior College gets 25 per cent for the loan fund, and if you come on the first night, it will get 50 per cent." "I will be very glad to help H. J. C," he replied. "I am an Elk myself." Fine and dandy, we thought, that's one dollar. "I am going to sell you my tickets for $6.00," he finished, "and your loan fund can make 50 per cent anyway." We thanked him and left quickly. ADOLPH MARKS. Scientific Humor Johnnie Mangum (in his charming soprano): They say there's microbes in a kiss, This rumor is most rife, Come, Greta dear, and make of me An invalid for life. Lillian Schwartz: I can't see why you fall asleep when Mr. Bishkin made the lecture so realistic. Evelyn Cochran: That's just it. talked on chloroform and ether aesthetics. Professor: Johnny, why is it that everything I tell you goes in one « and out the other? "I didn't know it did, sir?" Voice back of room: "That's right; it doesn't. Sound can't pass through a vacuum. Mr. Schumann: What is density? Mack Douglas: Er—it's something like thickness. Mr. Schumann: Yes—when applied to students. quirements that a student might earn grade of C with only a ten-hour daily preparation. I must warn you to become more rigid in your requirements. It was also called to my attention that you passed two students last year. Either the students are getting smarter or you are getting more generous, we have never had anything like that to happen since you have been teaching school. Yours for the good old days, Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer. Mr. N. K. Dupre. Dean H. J. C.: Sadly I pen this epistle to you. I am totally unable to find any diversion in the Junior College and I appeal to you to add more activities. Personally, I think a pie-eating contest would increase student interest. Pie-eating is a vigorous and manly sport and I entreat you to add it to the athletic curricula. Having long and vainly been passionately addicted to ping-pong, I heartily recommend this sport to stimulate courage among the students. Hoping for more sports, Allen Marshall. Costly Nuisances Yield Riches By BLANCHE DEKEL Not so long ago copper refineries were considered a nuisance. The sulphur dioxide fumes from the refineries killed all vegetation for miles around. Something had to be done so equipment was installed to make sulphuric acid from the gas. However the acid became so plentiful that it was no longer profitable. The chemical engineers used phosphate rock with the acid and made acid phosphate, which is a very necessary ingredient of agricultural fertilizers. As a result the same fumes which not long ago destroyed crops are now used make them grow. In past years many wells were dug for brine, to make salt. Men were annoyed when the appearance of oil spoiled these nice salt wells! They drained it off and threw it away. Today wells are still being spoiled. Now they are oil wells, spoiled by salt water. During this stage of the oil industry refiners had trouble in converting the petroleum into kerosene. An explosive fluid was extracted for which there was no use. It was poured on the ground and into the rivers. It often caught fire and at one time the Delaware river was aflame for three miles. Today this liquid is sold to motorists as gasoline. Platinum also has gone through an amazing range of values. When it was cheap people sold it in place of gold. Today students at Columbia University are shown a china tea set, plated with platinum which was made in Russia. A czar had given a man some silver bullion with which to make a silver plated tea set. The man kept the silver and used platinum instead, which he obtained from an old stovepipe! Now great quantities of our jewelry are made from platinum. As it resists corrosion, it is also used as a container for corrosives. Platinum screens are used in forcing ammonia gas to take oxygen from the air. Nitric acid is formed from the resulting gas. All of these uses have caused the price of platinum to soar high. Sawmills now are making use of their scrap. It is reduced to charcoal, wood alcohol, and various acids. Chemistry has triumphed also in the creamery industry. From the casein in the skim milk many useful articles are made such as massage cream, fountain pens, glue and many others. Cottonseed has come into great use within the last few years. The fuzz on the outside of th? seed is used in the production of explosives, artificial silk, rope and other substances. The "greens" on small golf courses are made from cottonseed. Flour for bread, cake, and crackers, is made from the kernel which is taken from the hull. The oil from the kernels is converted into oleomargarine, salad oil and cosmetics. Besides this it is also used for making soap and dye- stuffs. Coke making was formerly a nuisance. Communities were smirched with soot from the smoke belched from the ovens. Today the smoke is kept inside and ammonia is obtained from the ovens. The fumes also yield gas and coal tar. From the coal tar oils are made which are used in making aniline dyes and high explosives such as TNT. Just as these nuisances have been conquered and made useful, research have It.) This latter fact may be verified by the exchange of partners at the end of the first encore. (Miss Hydroxide merely having sung the wrong tune out of time and stepped on his feet ten times out of ten and one-half—oh, these fickle males.) Mr. Hydrogen, sensing the situation, took his new partner, Miss Hydroxide, and* left the hall for parts unknown, (Unknown to what?) At the end of the dance, Mr. Sodium looked and looked for his former partner (Believe il or not, the very original comment is, "Oh, yeaahh?"), but of no avail. It seemed to hm as though Mr. Hydrogen and Miss Hydroxide had evaporated. (Even his best friends wouldn't tell him.) What else could Mr. Sodium do but take Miss Chloride home. (In a Morton's container, of course.) Having reached their destination, they stood silent like pillars of salt (they were not Junior College students), and the only consolation they found was in saying that the eloping couple had no taste." MORAL: It always pours when it rains. Romance a la Freud Pray tell me, my own dainty darling, About your centripetal nerve; Is your cerebral ganglion working In a manner I like to observe? Does the gray matter answer my pleading. And cause vaso-motors to move? Ah, dearest, do let the medulla Oblongotta respond to my love. Your corpora quadrigemini, sweet one, As also the pons varoli, I love with an earnest affection, The result of complex stimuli, And this coordination of atoms My cerebum will still carry on Till cardiac motion be ended And Peripheral feeling be gone. Then relax all your facial muscles, As the nerves of ambition vibrate; Of your heterogeneous feelings Make a dear homogeneous state. When the ganglia growing compounded In the great billoped mass effloresce, Let them send through the thorax sensation To prompt an articulate "Yes." will continue t conquer many more. A Chemical Romance What Does Chemistry Mean to Me? "What does chemistry mean to me?" said Mr. Narrowhead as he looked at this page, printed with ink made by a chemical process, on paper made by chemical process. As he pushed back his cuff, bleached by a chemical process, and laced his shoes, tanned by a chemical process, he glanced through a pane of glass, made by a chemical process, and saw a baker's cart full of bread, leavened by a chemical process, and a draper's wagon delivering a parcel of silk made by a chemical process. He pulled out his pencil, made by a chemical process, and wrote a reminder in his notebook bound by imitation morocco, made by a chemical process. He rang the bell, the energy for which was supplied by a chemical process, and asked the office boy to get him some Texas figs, the quality of which had been improved by a chemical process. Mr. Narrowhead then straightened his tie which was dyed by a chemical process. Finally, upon receiving the figs, he bit ort one of them with disgust and yelled, "Chemistry doesn't mean a thing to me." If more of us really knew the significance of chemistry in our daily life, how packed the chemistry classes would be with eager students. This is a "chemical age." Why not study some chemistry? "Mr. Sodium took Miss Hydroxide i a dance. (Darned if I'd take a dame with a name like that any j place.) At the dance were present i also some acquaintances of the couple—namely, Mr. Hydrogen and Miss i Chloride. (Worse and more of it.) Mr.! Sodium felt a great attraction for Miss ■ Chloride, XOh, well, four out of five | VISIT THE AUSTIN STAND Across from San Jacinto on Austin Try our Sandwiches, Box Lunches, Pies, Etc. FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
File Name uhlib_10270243_v006_n002_003.jpg