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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930 - File 003. May 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/29/show/27.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/29/show/27

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930 - File 003, May 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/29/show/27.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 6, May 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 6, May 1930
Contributor
  • Neil, R. E., Jr.
Date May 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR EDITOR'S NOTE: It Is customary for class prophecies to be very optimistic in their revelations of the successes of the class members. This prophecy is different—AND HOW! It is assumed that the members of the 1930 graduating class of Houston Junior College will hereby take warning, and that they will strive to prove that this prophet was just having a nightmare, sea horse, or what have1 you. At all events, it is hoped mat when the class holds a re-union twenty years hence, many of Its present members will be among those who have made great and worth-while progress In the various arts and sciences of All day the brazen, boiling sun bad beaten down on our pith helmets our little safari hud threaded Its way through the endless dunes and coulees of the great desert. In the distance. Bhlmmering in the heat waves, lay the blue expanse of the foothills and camp —camp and a few hours' respite before the sun came hurtling across the heavens to bring another endless day of weary plodding. Three hours later we sat around the little campfire. attempting to draw from the smouldering coals a little heat to take the chill of the cold night breeze from our tired, aching bodies. Fitful gusts or the wind sweeping down out of clear skies, bringing with It a breath of the stars' brilliance, cast a tender glow upon the faces of we three, easing and smoothing the h lines of care and worry and the sharp features into something Infinitely tender and soothing. Four months in the desert country had left its mark on my own features and those of Mars- ters, my companion and secretary. The search for material, color, and setting for my new novel had carried us through countless dangers and adventures. Tagari. my trusted guide and leader of the natives, huddled lighted as the day. There is a great throng of people In the streets, and all seem to be going In the same direction. It is a time of great activity and anticipation. I see now their destination, a group of buildings set apart In beautiful lawns and hedges. Over the entrance are the words. College of Houston.' " Tagarls' words brought a flash to my miud of old associations. I knew from his description that it was graduation and commencement night. My mind slipped back twenty years to the night when 1 stood on the platform of the Houston Junior College nad received my diploma, just as this class of graduates would tonight. 1 had not then conceived of Ihe history UnM 1 was helping to make. Our meager beginnings had developed into the establishment of a great institution. Memories of that old class held me in retrospect for some time, and without further encouragement Tagari resumed his meditative mysticisms. My mind went back to the last reports that I had received rrom members or the class of 1930. John Aleo has become a Knight of the Croaa-Uea and has to his credit tbe transcontinental record for his order. Grace McDonald and Llssabelle Crittenden are engaged In a shady business—they are proprietors of blind and window shade shop. ifuih Kidd has become a mission- | ary to the China area since Howard Branch refused to marry her. Dots Dawson Is In the talkies—she does historical sequences. Helen Allnoch started out on a i-muni the world tour but was stranded at the South Pole and Is now running a hot-dog stand in an attempt to get euuugh money to get home. Ellen Cleveland started out with her, but found a great opportunity in the Sandwich Islands—she is selling heal i owner to the natives. Anna Ray Gomperts has starteiL the literary world with her latest melodrama, "Love Letters of an Egyptian Hod-Carrier." Lamar Gram Is selling ladles' ready, to-wear at a Houston store. Mary Alice Graves has established the Samaritans' Sanctuary for Friendless Felines. Donald Lang Is selling Fords he got his start by selling a twenty-five passenger Job to the King of the Fiji Islands. Roy Hill is posing for Arrow Col lar ads. Margaret Boyett and Weldon Med- dera hold the non-stop record for the United States and surrounding territories in non-stop talking. Russell Angell saved the world from a shortage of Ivory by becoming bald- headed. Another martyr to science. Grace Campbell and Frances Foster are miners. They are gold-diggers. Ida Mehr has her ups and downs— an elevator in the new home of the Houston Dally Mirror. Mrs. Floyd Curtslnger is all out of joint. She tried to learn to speak Yiddish. Reverts Eaves is getting new ideas out or her head all the time. She Is doing wood carvings. Francis Harris, who always had starched for her Ideal—"Breathes there a man so dead—" has found It MRS. KATHLEEN DUGGAN With the Jokesmiths W. H. MINER ■ of H. J. C. and Spanish Instructor K. Foreman: "Are you fond of moving pictures?" "Yes, yes," answered Mauree Anderson, hopefully. Kenneth F.: "Then help me move some from the library. "Dear Lord." prnyed Irene Cafcalas, "I don't ask anything for myself— just give mother a son-in-law." limb Leggett: "Don't you dare to kiss me or I'll yell for my father." J. W. Newton: "Where is he?" Ruth 1-.: "In South America." ill Jeter: I'll bet that's Jasmine lipi-iick you're wearing." Mildred Smith: "You're wrong, big boy. kiss again-' ice for the Port city toe Company. gumma Moore and Matlle Neel are living pretty high on their royalties received from their patented muffler for soup inhalers. MrB. Ruth Newsom. inlernational prima donna, has given up her position as official menu-caller In the Harvey Mouse ut Goose Creek to go back to her old position as night floorwalker at (he orphans' home. Lucille Seeley has entered Hie field >l a en >u a ii lies. S'.ie Is selling balloons al the corner of Main and Mils llllleV. Mrs W, s. Baty'a bualneaa is looking up. She has a position in a reference library. 1'iLiiline Ault has made her mark as a movie actress. She recently appeared in a Human mob scene. Gerald Babeooh and Leslie James, the great scientists, huve performed the difficult feat of extracting beams From a bottle. Helen Cheney has just finished her greatest piece or literature, in which she has employd a rather airy style It la entitled, "tide to a Worn-Out Inner Tube." Sophie Zlellnskl and Valuta KHiulda have formulated a plan for Irrigating land at the South Pole with water from the Great Dipper. rani Weal das done important work in the airmail field. He has developed a reatherwelght My paper. Patsy Miller has been offered great sums of money for a picture which she snapped Of William Wrigley struggling over a piece of chewing gum which be picked up unwittingly on Main street during a recent visit. Mickey Smith is in Zulu-land teach- ing the natives some new wrinkles. She Is introducing her new dance called the "Couger Creep." I W Newton has a position where he handles lots of money. He is dray- Leola (Jobber: "And what did you y to the minister aTter you told him we were going to play the game of matrimony?" "I said, "Won't you Join us?' " Salesman: "Can you pay ror that typewriter now?" Ruth Wheeler: "Why, you told me thai ii WOUld pay lor itself In a few weeks." Professor of History Margajret Drennan: "Mother, are you the neansi relative I have';" Mrs. Drennan: "Yes, dear, and your father Is the closest." Uarjorle Norral: 'Tin always getting mixed up In some kind of scandal. Why, the Dally Blurb has gone and printed a story that I blew out my brains with a revolver last night." Alice McCullough: "Oh. I'm so sorry. How did you do It" George Dunk: "Now that I'm your hero, let's go to the drugstore and drink to ihe day we marry." Frances K, Smith: "I'm afraid I can't stay that long." Cathryn Meyers: "You may not believe it, hut 1 said 'No' to seven different men during last winter." I.yndcll Parker: "Oh, I don't doubt it. What were they selling?" "Where Quality, Service and Experience Count" BILAO'S SHOE SHOP Special Attention Paid to Ladies' Shoes A TRIAL IS ALL I ASK PHONK PRESTON 7910 1108 Capitol Avenue — Homer Helton, the big Llmhurge closer to the embers and drew the (.hee9e magnate man for tbe U. Kmii Peti rao worm holes In j The embers mint. has a job boring tluue furniture. dead and cold, Josephine Maske is a physical edu- cation expert. She Is delivering a series of lectures on "Coupe Cales- thenlcs." George Fly has at last taken a liking for mathematics. He is weighing ulti-colored blanket about his weather-beaten old body. His eyes had not BltweJ trom Ihe lop Of the on. .anOal bec of ^^ ^^ which stuck out trom the folds of his blanket. He was old—how old, no one seemed to know. It was often said that he possessed the powers of a mystic. For days he had seemed perturbed and he had spoken little, save for his orders and reports. I was determined to awaken him from his reverie and find the cause of it all. I spoke rather sharply: "Tagari, why do you seem so worried?" It was some time before he answered: "Sahib, the full moon brings a whisper from across tshe sea. Something different and foreign to my un- dersiandings." My curiosity was aroused by this unexpected information. His voice held a new note—a monotone, rever- brating and wierd. harmonizing with the sounds of the desert—camel snort- ings. natlve chantings. moans of resistance from the tall date-palms as the wind scudded along. The native spoke again: "I see a group of buildings, massive and tall. It seems to be a elty such as you often speak of as home. There are great lines of trees and streets paved and and Marstern and Tagari had left me from the west. I alone to mv thoughts. However, I Lela Hillyer entered the slxdaykid-. rat there alone In the chill until an- car contest, but had lo withdraw | other cold, gray dawn hushed the sounds of the desert night and Mrs. Faye Ledlow was In charge oft brought me to a new day and hope— a. banana factory, but they ran out' life and despair. of skins and had to shut down. j ^—^^^_^^__^^^^__^^__^^ Paul Le Gros has become an artist of note. He is a stenographer. Compliments of the TEXAS BLUE PRINT & SUPPLY CO. 1013 Capitol Ave. Between Fannin and Main Phone Preston 4907 and 4906 Attend Houston Junior College A FULLY ACCREDITED COLLEGE Offers an opportunity to . . . —Cain a College Education While Working —Live at Home While Attending the College ^SakowitzRro On Main at Rusk SMART CLOTHES FOR WELL-DRESSED BOYS "It Came from Sweeney's". Need more be said of a graduation gift—whether it be a watch or a ring, a piece of jewelry or silverware. Many smaller inexpensive gifts now on display. JJ.Wnq Jewelry (o. •yjoo maid sthsbt count*, capitol *■
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