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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 003. January 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 17, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/22.

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(January 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/22

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 003, January 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 17, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/22.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 3, January 1930
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date January 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR THE STORY OF A JUNIOR COLLEGE FRESHMAN SWEATERS FORTHCOMING SOMETHING FOR COUGAR GRIDMEM* SOMEWHAT By SLIM BOUKNIGHT KANNERDY When class was over at 7 o'clock Wednesday everybody started runnin' down the hall and up to the third floor. I ast Bob Tracey whur the fahr was t and lie ast me "what for?" Then I ast him, "don't you know what a fahr is? Farli! Farh! You mean to tell me you ain't never been to one?" Well he got kinda smart and wanted to know if I meant "fiah" or something like that. Some people oughta learn to talk decent. Well, I went on up to the third floor like everybody else was doln' and run Into a big room. They was nigh onto a hundred nice, clean, shiny, black top tables with four iron cheers around it. I bet that room was as big as our town hall whur we usta practice our band music. Well, sir, everybody was gittin' in line and agoin' through a door and 1 got in line behind Irene Cafcalas and I ast her what this was. She looked at me like as not I didn't smell so good and all to wunst her nose begin to go up on the end. Hun, maybe she didn't know who I am! A feller named Block was behind me and said as how this here wan a cafatery, a place whur you et cheaper. When I got through the door there It all was. Gosh, I ain't never seen nothin' like this before. Why, this beat the time we had the lawg rollin' and all the folks came over and we cleared them fifteen acres of new ground. I wondered efen I could prop my feet on one of them cheers and lean back like I do at home when we get to the end of the line a lady took my and kinda smiled at me. Boy, I bet she knows who I am. Ooooh, my pore corn! When I had et a lot of other folks was through, too, and they was all agoin down stairs to the second floor for something. We passed a long line of folks waitin' to eat, nut we geat it on down to the second floor. I ast Louise Shepperd where bouts we wa goin' at and she said "to assembly. I ain't takin' assembly this year so I 'lowed as how I wouldn't go, but she said "you better or you'll be absent and get a had mark." Wei I went and it wasn't no class a tall. Now wouldn't that kill you? I met Orpha Harris, a good lookin' gal, agoin' through the door of the assembly and me and her set. together in the middle. That shore is a purty room. And nigh onto five hundred seats or maybe more. They was a great big gold stripe runnin' around the top of the wall and a big platform In front of us set back in the wall. Orpha said as how that was the stage. Well, on top of the stage was a funny lookin' pianner. Aunt Lucy has got a organ, but it ain't nothin' like that there planner. Purty soon a good lookin' girl got up on the stage and played. Boy, she shore could play. Mr. Dupre, the dean, got on the stage then and said a lot to us, but we couldn't hear nothin' fer gum chewin' and whisperin' and gigglin'. Sounded like Alph Tate's bee hives. Well, Mr. Dupre whistled fer everybody to git quiet and told all the sophomores to git over on the west side of the hall, all freshmen in the middle whur me and Orpha was a settin' and all the special students on the east side of the hall. Me and Orpha got up and started to go over to the east side when same smart alec hollered at me "Hey, whur abouts youall agoin'? Come on over here whur you belong at?" Maybe he don't know who I am. Me and Orpha set on the east side. And I ain't, agoin' to set In the middle so long as Orpha sets over here. "I want youall to make good grades thig year so you'll hafta study hard," is what Mr. Dupre 'lowed. I'm afeered he don't exactly know who I am yit. Anyway, he said as how we must study purty hard so's weall would git demoted or somethin' like that. (Ooo- oohhh, boy! Wait'II I git home. I'm agoin' to pull this here shoe off right away.) We are agoin' to electa yell leader, so Mr. Dupre says, and I seen everybody lookin' at me and Orpha, and I 'lowed to her they was agoin' to make me yell leader and started to show her how I could holler .1 was a good yeller on our team. But Mr. Dupre 'lowed as how we ought to make Roy Hoffheinz (or somethin' like that), seein' s how he was already actin' in that capacity. I didn't know he was a actor feller. Anyway, I told Orpha as how it would be better to let Roy go on and yell instid of me. Mr. Dupre then says as how he don't want nobody droppin' any eours- May be he don't know me. I an't agoin' to drop no course. But I guess maybe he meant some other feller. He said somethm' about no refunds bein' made after the fifteenth day. Well, so long as they ain't got no money of mine I ain't skeered o' not bein' refunded. Some times you don't git exactly what fs acomin' on these unds. I had one wunst and you should uh seen it. Then, sez he, Mr. Dupre, "Ilu a gonna hold you responsible for all announcements on the Junior College Bulletin Board, and later on we inout have the use o£ the high school bul- etin, but right now youall will be responsible for everything on yore own board." I don't write on boards. I can buy paper and pencil, I reckin'. He said somethin' about not parkin' my cyar in the driveway. I reckon he don't know who I am. I don't need no cyar. I fills 'em up and they drive away. I work at a first-class fillin. station. Anyway, efen I had a cyar I'm supposed to drive in on the left driveway from San Jacinto street, and oh the right driveway from Austin street. Oh, well, I ain't got no cyar. I was gittin' tahrd and 'lowed as how I was agoin' to snuck out and go somewhur, but she wouldn't let me. She says, sez she, "Mr. Smith, the coach is agoin' to say something." And, he did. Boy, it made my blood boil. What he told them there other students was a fright. The ornery, no account, hairless, bull yearlins. Now, ain't that crazy? A blanket tax is somethin' you pay so as to go to all the games and to help pay expenses of the teams and activities. 1 know because SHE said so. They didn't have me fooled none. I knowed all the time. They oughta know who I am now. (Oooh! Gosh! That shoe shore does hurt). Monday night Mr. Smith said, we side hall at 7:10 and all freshmen on are agoin' to elect class officers. Sophomores air to meet on the west (he east side hall. Well, sir, I can pick out the president of us fresh fellers right now. I told her to gave on IT while he had the chanst, as I moughtent be able to give her no time after I'm elected on account of me being so popular. I shore was popular back home. All the gals was jest crazy about me. 1 coulda got a date with all six of them efen I had wanted it. Well sir, Comes Wednesday, October 16, (lessee, this here Is Wednesday, October 9th), we are agoin' to elect the student association officers. Huhn? What did you say, kiddo? Oh, nominate them? Oh. Shore. I knowed all aong. It Is Frida> the 18th we are agoin' to e'ect the ossifers. Mr. Smith them 'lowed as how we was agoin' to play a football game Saturday, the 19th, and ast us all to be there. I done get me a gal to go Seventeen men! Those who reported for practice in rain or shine; those who fought when the play was open over hard green turf or when it a battle of the linesmen down in the muck and water of a cold October evening. Those who tackled as hard when they were fighting a losing battle as they did when the odds were with them; the »ainstays of a deservng team. Seventeen men! Ends: Sherrard "Teb" Warden, Allen Eaton, Harry Mathews; tackles, Farrell Wallace, Aaron Brown, Jack Fleming; guards, Floyd Galbraith, Nick Peel, John Driscoll, John Lehde, center, Weldon Morris; backs, Chas. Jorter, John Aleo, Louis Christiansen, Jake Passante, William Jeter, Willard Nesmith. Manager, Bob Tracy and coach, C. B .Smith. Their sweaters will be presented to them at an early daie. with. Then Miss Kidd got up and 'lowed ns how we was all Cougar Collegiates and we should be proud and stick our chists outen our shirts. They is to he another meetin', too. A important one. Down in room 118, Friday night, October 11th, at nine thirty. Miss Kid wants all us fellers, every one of us, to come down. I know right now she Is agoin' to ast me to say something'. Well, it's about time. They don't know who I am (Ooooooh') "Say," sez Orpha to me, "Do you know Ruth Kidd is president of the Cougar Collegiates and is a takin' six subjects in her sophomore year? No7 Well, she shore is." Oh, baby, Me and her Is agoin' to be swell friends. Just wait till she finds out who I am. "Say, dizzy, are you agoin' out fer football " some smart guy asts me. I give him a dirty look outa my bad ye and he slunk again i.ne wall sbiv- erin. I don't know whur no football Is at to go out fer It, but this guy says "I'm Red Porter"-—well, he must be the captain of the team. Walt 'til I git on that team. You can bet you'll mighty quick find out win agoing to be the captain. "Air you kinda puny?" this captain says to me Hubii-I can lick foah like him. But he says to come and git in unyform and the coach would give me a tryout. You oughta see me in that unyform. Hot, daddy! I shore look scrumptuous. Efen Sally could see me now. The captain Is kinda skeered fer me to go out. I'm thiukin' because he knows mighty well he* won't he captain long. I looked at them shoes we had to aar. "Say, coach," I told him. "I can't wear them shoes," And be says, Well, they may be a little big but try them today." Big! Huhn! They are only tens and a half. Jump on the ball," says the coach. I did. Gosh, what a funny thing happened. The darned ball turned sideways and I fell on my ear. The coach bragged his hair with both hands and hollered "r-r-r-r-r-r-" through his teeth. He musta had a mighty had head- Say, feller," he says to me, "Fall on that ball." I did. Woof. It knocked the air outen my stomick. Shore did hurt. Well, the coach had another headache and started to go git some medicin. We halked around with his hands on his head mutterin': Say rummy," he says to me, "Can you kick?" Well, I 'lowed as how 1 The last time I kicked that yearlin' fer jumpin' the fence, he ain't jumped it no more. Then that feller ast ME efen I can kick. Ho! ; Boy. I drawed back them twelves mine and lammed her good. You should of seen how funny it acted. It turned right around and shot out lefthanded and hit Martin Lowe li the year so hard he fell over moanin He shore was mad. Up he jumped and run at me with his flstes doubled up like. Then he stuck his face in mine and hollered at me about bein' dumb. He was chewing peppermint gum. I smelt it. You understand, I wasn't afeard of him, but I didn't say nothin' on ac count of maybe havin' to lick him right in front of all them fellers. "Y'oung feller," says Mr. Smith, "I 'low as you oughtn't to be tool: away from your work and studies, so I'm agoin to put 'Country' Brown in yore place." But I told him. thass all rite, I can git away when we have gamej p'ay so the other feller won't hafta come out. Say, kin you tackle?" the Captain ast me. Huhn. I aim a goin' tlsh- No, no," he says, "just run and grab me like I was tryin' to git away. Tackle me, see?" How could I tackle that guy when he run away. But he said as how I was supposed to run after him, but about that time I came up to whur he was a standin' and grabbed him round the ck and throweu him over my shoul- r on the ground. He shore wa3 mad. Oh, well. They dont' seem to know who I am anyway. All right, fellers. Around the field four times then the shower," says the, coach. All the fellers tuck out down the football patch like they was agoin to a fahr. Of course, I didn't want to make nobody sore the first time so I stayed behind a ways, next time I'm agoin to run off leave that bunch like water often a duck's back. Gosh! Havin' to take a bath on Tuesday. Can you beat that? Oh, welt, I mought as well git usen to it. May have to take three a week this away. "What's the matter, boy? How often do you bathe, anyway ?" John Driscoll ast me. "Well, I appeared like I was usen to hathin' so I ups and says, "Well, I always take at least three. Some times foah," and thowed my chlst out kinda. He snickered, but I'm on to him. He can't fool me. He don't know who I am. "Slim," asks Miss Thomason "Whur about was you all at last Wednesday?" Doggone. How did she know me and Orpha cut class bet that low down, tater eyed, melon rlned, bull yearlin' of a Roy went and told her. Jest wait till I git that young shoat out in the dark sommers. "Say, Slim, how about writin' some of yore memwires?" says Mr. Birney to me tother day. I ain't much of a poet, but I mout try. Y'ou shou'd oughta see her eyes. "Eyes of brown, hair of ebon hue, lips of a cupid's bow and hands of a lovely rosey hue." Boy I how's that? But, you should see her. Just like this (on one side and just like this) on tother. She shore is th ecats, I ain't kiddin you. I ain't much of a poet so don't like writin' memwires. Ill git Geo. Lan- now to written them fer me. Oh, he says as how is name air Jag. Lanaux. Looks as If the likes o' him would git a real name. Like FRESHMAN BALL— (Continued from Page 1) Wayne Phelps, Jack Thurman and Howard Graham looked. ■Sweethearts on Parade — Maurine Edminister and Terry Russ dancing by. Blonde "Boots" Horn reluctantly breaking with H. C. Nagle. Someone would lag In just then (?). And Irene Cafcalas getting the grand rush—as usual. Wasn't her red taffeta gown a dream? "Dancer of all dancers"—that's Willie "Dim" Dixon. Lucky girl, Alice MeCullough. Petite Mildred Learned, coyly vamping everyone's fellow. Big things come in small packages. Even the tiny ones are great competition Oh, we can't forget the Collegians. The music was great. We are trying to find out the name a Dallas visitor who completely enamored Harry Faerstein, also of Dallas. She is visiting someone in Woodland Heights. What's the idea of the "Big Parade" in the middle of the floor? Oh, just boys lined up to tag Adele. Someone almost made a "Smash- g" entry to the ballroom at River Oaks. The culprit haa not yet been apprehended who failed gain entrance dance, but succeeded in breaking a window at the River Oaks Country Club. Ikky" Tracy "dot a durl." We saw her, 'n her name 'ith Alyth Thpilman. Hello, Oliver! From the smile of contentment on your face we judge you succeeded in getung her phone number. Feme Sweeney and her attractive sister. Family competition. Speaking of family competition, we wonder where Celia's kid sister was. She has been much in evidence at other Junior College activities. Question Number Five:—Who was the couple that went riding during the long intermission, and failed to return till the dance was almost over? (And not with her date, either). Question Number Six.—Who was the girl who made a hurried trip home to change dresses after ripping the back of her dance frock? And how come? Why, Miss Mackuy, you do look lovely. Quite the only person I know who can look as well in sport togs as in formal attire. Donald Lang and a group playing poker. No money Involved, just a friendly game, Fred Mills, turn around so we can see how you look in a Tux. Rather swanky. And who was the precious blonde? There's Coach Smith—and every girl's eyes glued on him. Have you a crush, too? Her last name is Bowen, and she dances beautifully. White taffeta was certainly becoming to this graceful blonde. Gobs of boys in the stag line, their eyes following the dancers. Probably looking for that certain someone. Howard Branch looking very trim, You can't Kidd me—you've eyes for Ruth only. I don't glame you. Pearl Friedman, very charming orchid of just the right color. "Home, Sweet Home" and the danct was over. Gee, but didn't you have grand time? ABOUT THE STUDENTS * * * * AND EX-RICE0N1ANS Ex-Ricers seem to be very promlhent this year at Junior College. Wonder why ? Perhaps It got too crowded at Rice .for them. Well, anyhow, there is a certain Ex-Ricer that seemi to prefer "a" brunette, or rather did prefer her until the competition from Lonnie Lyons got too hot. Everyone has been wondering why a certain tall brunette by the initials of K. K. holds her nose so high la Hope it can be remedied. It would be terrible to have to hold it that high all the time not only at the college. August Krell certainly seems to have it, bad with Frances Eva Smith. As for It being mutual, you'll have to ask her. We have noticed a young man of Rice by the initials of G. D. over here quite often. Speaking of "lines," gtrli, beware of Wayne Phelps. His lino is substantial enough to hang ruga on. If that is what it takes to get over, he should In a big way. We wonder if those two couples in a certain car parked near thy San Jacinto street entrance ever went to get their "coke" Vierore their 8:30 p. m. class? They said this certain place was on Austin street. Gee, s'tco bad Alyce Spilman had to quit school—and we're all wondering why. Anything in the way of young men? Especially the one by the initials of J. D. B.? "Wonder if Bill will be out here tonight," seems to be Inquired of Maurine Edminster pretty often these days. Oh, yes, it's Bill Brodie the St. Edwards football man. We've noticed that H. C. Nagel, a Rice soph, only comes after Boots Horn two or three times a week. You all know they're supposed to be going steady, but people, you can't fool us, H. C. is having dates those other nites, huh ? We know 'cause we're not blind. Looks like O. McCall is giving Jane Witherspoon the rush. Is it anything , or is it just brotherly and sisterly love? Two blondes, too. Get Roy Hofheinz to tell you about the time he took a certain blonde to Le Blanc's and after having ordered he discovered he had left his dollar at school. too bad Fred Weigman is leaving school. Wonder who Mamie Claire Brown will rush now? Sure is funny how these boys who pretend they're in love will take other girls home, and sit in front of their homes until all hours of the night, especially Alice McCullough and Robert McKinney. Dark Tragedy Two blacky negroes, there were once. One was Ambrose and the other Gus; And now this tale I will relate, Of these, same two who had a fuss. Now Ambrose was a-layin' bricks, And drinkin' bootleg beer, And Gus he just was walkin' by And ambled to him near. "Now look-a-here, you Ambrose, You quit hangin' round my gal, This ain't no kind of treatment To be givin' to your pal." But Ambrose he was mighty quick, And up iie spake and said: "They ain't no use of arguin' Or they'll be one more nigger dairl." And out he yanked a shiny blade And stabbed Gus through the client; Then off he ran a-ye!lin' loud: "Now which one of us is best." And this is how the tale doth end Of Ambrose and of Gus. I ask each one and all of you, How could It end but thus? —Grace McDonald. Slim or Puffy, or somethin' dignified, eryone." Bobby McC. (in restaurant) you serve fish in here?" Waiter: "Certainly, we cater to ev- time, in thy flight—make it C. R. YEAGER'S LAMENT 'Twas the night before pay day, and all through my jeans,I hunted In vain for the price of some beans. Not a I quarter was stirring, not even a jit; Do | the kale was off duty, milled edges had quit. Forward, turn forward, O just for tonight.
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