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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 002. January 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/21.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(January 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/21

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930 - File 002, January 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/24/show/21.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 3, January 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 3, January 1930
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date January 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Hrnist.m .Junior College. Pub- ]ishi.(1 l>v ill.- .hnii-ii:LlLs.ni i >enai-tniL-nt, Houston Junior College. EDITORIAL STAFF Louise Shepperd Editor-in-Chief Margaret Bovett Assistant Editor Denis SnelgT Make-up Helen Cheney Activity Doris Hartman Humor Robert Tracey Sport F. R, Birney Advisor FEATURE "WRITERS George Lanaux Frances Foster Mrs P B. Nagel J. M. Gorman Frances Willard Celia. Lesky REPORTERS Ivalice Horn Margaret Tab-any Zelda Amdur Lamar Grant Mary Adele Cobb Jane Witlni sp<n.n R. E Neil Harold Sninm.-'liii Mauree Anderson Alyce Spilman Fred Mills Maurlne Kdmlnster BUSINESS Myron Schelling Manager Harold Wood Assistant Manager Wilma Tleman Typist ADVERTISING Celia Lesky Manager W. H. Miner. Virginia Rainbolt Assistant Managers The Finals Are Coming The coming finals remind us that students of Junior College, as well as of all other institutions of learning, are too inclined to dread final examinations and to regard them as a punishment imposed by the instructor. As a matter of fact, finals may be made a most valuable part of each college course for the student. They afford a means of checking up on ourselves to see how much we have really gotten from the course. They show just where our weakness lies, for the instructor seldom fails to touch on each important division of his course in the finals. No instructor relies entire'-y on final examination grades and if a student has done passing work all through the course he has little to fear from the finals and may benefit greatly thereby. KLUB KOLUMN Be Boosters Boosters build, knockers tear dow It matters not what the organization may be, this rule always proves true. Many students in Junior College are real boosters. But some do not appear to be so loyal. If a person fully rea'izes what the College offers him, at a minimum charge, and at hours which allow him to work his way while attending school, he surely will have little cause to be a knocker. Many high school students judge the College by the actions and words of their friends who are now enrolled here. Let your words and your actions show that you are attending a real, live co'lege, and that you are proud of your school. If you can not take this attitude, why are you here? Better far that you should get out and try some other institution, where you may find matters even less to your liking. But if you are interested in the future welfare of Houston Junior College, invite your friends to come here ■when they finish high school. And do more than just invite them. Show them the advantages offered. Explain to them that they can work at a full- time occupation, and still attend their classes here. Point out the fact that Houston Junior College is a fully accredited, fu'ly recognized Junior College, with instructors of the highest caliber, and offering training unexcelled in any college or university. Having pointed out these academic advantages, why not mention the athletic side, and the social events which make the college something beside a place for hard work and Intensive study ? Be Boosters for Houston Junior College. THE FORENSIC COUNCIL The Forensic Council is composed of the following students: Howard Branch, president of the Rostrum; Terry Russ, president of the Harri- sonlans; Maxwell Von Ludtke, President of the Speakers; J. W. Newton, president of the Houston Junion College Oratorical Association, and H. W. Harris, coach of Debate at the Houston Junior College. It held Its first meeting January 3, 1930. The purpose of this council is to determine the public speaking policies of the Houston Junior College for the year. Plans were discussed for arranging of debates to be held in the near future. SCHOLIA CLUB At the bi-monthly meeting of the Scholia Club, January 8, Mary Pierce gave an interesting talk on "The Unused Volumes in Our Library." Her statements were based upon a recent survey of the library made by Mr. Henderson, Instructor in education, and his 233 education classes. This survey will enable the librarians and teachers to seleet more useEul books. The members selected and put in their orders for club pins. The Scholia Is an Education Club, sponsored by the Education Classes. Although It has been in existence but two months, it has gained recognition as one of the most active clubs In Junior College. CAMPUS DRAG No matter how much and how severely Mr. Dupre talks, Pete Garrison, John Aleo, Howard Branch and a few others are always decorating the front cf the Junior College building. Mamie Claire Brown had better make a New Year's resolution and attend gym class once in a while. Look! Here comes sheik Oliver Mc- Call. He's one boy who has a smile for everybody. And Max Ludtke and Adele Drenkle —is she the latest. Max? Terry Russ, the "HI" fellow with the big personality. Bill Bauer, Morris Wilson and Joe Cain—they seem to be big buddies. Poor Bill—his girl goes to Central. Mr. Duggan conies for Mrs. Duggan early on Tuesday and Thursday nites —just like a date, Isn't It, Mrs. Duggan? Hugh Manford—and who Is your crush, Hugh? No one seems to know Here comes H. C. Nagel, a Rice sophomore, who comes for Ivalice Horn. Gee, they sure have been going steady a long time. See—it can be done! Mr. Birney, who is trying to en- arge his journalism classes. Jane Wltherspoon surely has a sweet disposition. Don't you think so? Always on the drag—Katherine Meyers and Wayne Phelps—cute couple, huh? Bobbie McCullough—all smiles— d that Freshman Ball was simply grand! And everyone sure had a grand time. SIDEWALKS AT SEVEN OR ON THE WALK OR * * * * NAME 'EM AND TAKE 'EM From the display of vanities, ties, handkerchiefs, and smiles, everyone is sure to have had a very merry Christ- Here comes that nice and tall J. M. Gorman. Wonder what causes the Ruth Kidd looks a little tired after the "strain" of the holidays. Suppose she's glad to get back to work! Such a likeable pair are MAX LUDTKE and TERRY RUSS. Late again is Mr. Birney to his class, but not late enough, thereby shattering the hope of getting a walk—maybe. Tile Harrises seem to flock together, such as in the case ol Joe Harris and Mr. Harris. J. W. Newton (Newtie) is stiil wondering who "spiked'' the punch at the Freshman dance. Do you reckon he's trying to cover his own sins? Coloma Powers has a faithful "shadow" in Lonnie Lyons. An attractive young business woman is Hazel Gindrup. We love her brown eyes. It's funny how some of these small and dainty co-eds have such husky shadows. In no hurry to get to class, Genevieve Weldon with Floyd Galbreath ; Eva Smith, likewise Gus Krell; Maurlne Edminsler versus Terry Russ. With a thoroughly business-like look around him, Dennis Sneigr. If you have hope of being nonchalant, take a look a Margaret Boyett and lose it. Not far UJehind is Mamie Claire Brown with "Bubba" Armstrong. A real blonde is Beatrice Biggs. You've heard that gentlemen prefer blondes. No wonder!! Two inseparables—Wayne Phelps id Soapy McGinty, coming back from supper, laughing, as usual, about something. And there's Catheryn Meyers, that adorable semi-blonde, with one of her many B. F's. Ask Miss Mackey to tell you all about her New Year's Eve party! 'NOT SO BAD" TO BE PRESENTED JANUARY 24 The John R. Bender Dramatic Club is presenting its bnemheiii in a comedy, "Not So Hod,' January 24, at S m., in the Wan Jacinto auditorium. After many serious workouts, the play is almost at perfection and Mrs. Bender, the ciub's sponsor, assures us of its success. Mrs, Lillian Blocker of the Houston Conservatory of Music has graciously offered her help for the benefit of the play and she can never realize how much it is appreciated, ated. The ca3t of the comedy is as fol- ws: Mrs. Markham. Grace McDonald; Mrs. Hobbs, Irene Cafcalas; Kitty Ransom, Alice McCullough; Harriet Wilson, Marie Cappin; Louise Markham, Hazel Taylor; Ethel Gris- , Ce'ia Lesky; Willard Hazard, Robert Moechel, Jimmy Tweed, Roy Hofheinz; Morris Hunter, S. Cowley; Mr. Markham, H. K. Foreman; Mr. Betts, Francis Hinton; Edward, John Hinton; Sophy, Zelda Amdur; Nora, Genevieve Weldon. PUBLIC SPEAKING AND * * # # JOURNALISM ARE VERY * ■* * # NECESSARY TO STUDENTS Far he it from me, ever so far, to try to tell you what subjects to sign up during the next semester. But if you want to make your college years count for something, if you want to make some definite achievement of which you can say "I did that my year at college," you will hiimediate- ly sign up for Public Speaking and Journalism. You think that because I am a member of the Journalism class, and a "member to be" of the Public Spending class, that I am a fanatic on both subjects. You are right, I am. There is nothing that I desire so much as to be able to express what I feel," said Mr. Harris. If Mr. Harris thinks that he lias a lot to learn about self-expression, how about you? Journalism will teach you how to "put yourself on paper." Public speaking will teach you how to express youprself effectively. Come on, from January 25 to January 28, you can sign up for these courses when you come to sign up for your regulars. HISTORY OF H. J. C— (Continued from Page 1) that the work done at the Houston Junior College is transferable at face value to all other Texas colleges, and that students from Houston and this section of Texas can do two full years of standard college work at home, which can be transferred without loss to all the colleges having membership in the Texas Association of Colleges. In view of the fact that no building was available for the college, it has had to hold Its classes in the San Jacinto High School building in the afternoon and evening hours from 4 to 9:30 o'clock. The Jacksonville College Mirror, published by the Jacksonville College, is a neat paper, showing careful editing. Good news, excellent editorials, and some rare humor put the paper above the average. The paper has several personal columns that add attraction to the already attractiveness of its wit and hhumor. W. Phelps: Your daughter, sir, has consented and made me the hasplest man in the world. Mr. Bullard (with a sigh of relief): Pardon me, the second happiest. Oliver McCall (pretty well perfumed, picked up the telephone): -Hello! Hie! Hello!!" "Hello!" returned the operator. "Hello!" "Hello!" "My gosh!" said he; "how this thing echoes!"—Exchange. The Mountaineer, edited by the Schreiner Institute of Kerrville, Tex., is an excellent paper. The front page is arranged very attractively with pictures to break the monotony of the regularity. It has some very good humor under the head of "Jots in Jest," besides a number of good jokes scattered throughout the whole paper. There is one column that deserves special note. The Here and There column has special mention of a number of miscellaneous subjects, including sports, short stories, and art. Firs'. Student: "I wish I could be like the river." Second Stupdent: "Like the river? In what way?" Firt Student: "Stay in my bed and yet follow my course." Fred Mills: "I could half-sole my shoes with that steak. Faculty: "Well, why didn't you?" Fred Mills: "I couldn't get the nails through."—Exchange. The Pacific Star, published by the Mount Angel College at St, Benedict, Oregon, ranks as more than just a college paper. It contains universal news as well as the college news. The paper has one column under the title of Echoes from Europe, that has news from various places such as France and Bunderland. Benedictine Notes, another column, gives information about the different church incidents. The humor, under the head of Stardust, is unusually good, having not too much to take up space but enough to make the paper Interesting. Harry L.: Doesn't that girl look like Helen Brown? Robert McG.: Yes, but she looks worse in black. Mother (indolently): "Willie, you've been a bad boy. Go to the vibrator and give yourself a good shaking." "Then there is the fastidious man, who puts on riding breeches to pitch horseshoes." Housewife (to garbage man): "Am I too late for the garbage?" Garbage Man: "No, ma'am; jump right in."—Exchange. The Gainesville High School at Gainesville, Texas, edits the Hi-Quest, a newsy paper containing lots of news. We are glad to have them on our exchange list. The paper had a unique way of writing up a weiner roast given by students, describing the treasure hunt that turned out to be suckers. It Is write-ups like these that catch the readers' eye and put more life into a paper. This little edition contains some rare jokes. Here are some: Irene C. went up to Mrs. Soule and said: "Oh look where a mouse bit Mrs. Soule: "Where?" Ireue: "In the staff room!" "Doc, I've just been bit by a dog!" Doc: Well, well; was he a rabid dog?" No, Doc, he was just a plain bird A. Krell—"Do you love me?" F. E. S.—"Why, of course, Freddie." A. K.—"Freddie!—my name's August!" F. E. S.—"Pardon me. I keep thinking this Is Tuesday night." WHEREIN IS UNFOLDED A MYSTERY OF WHY THE DESERTED CORRIDOR I Sighed. Why I sighed is beyond me. Perhaps it had something to do with the spirit of the times. Perhaps I sighed because I realized that, for three hundred and fifty days, I would hear no sanctimonious carolers, read no more "Empty Stocking" tales, see no more maidens, huddled about under quaint Salvation Army bonnets, as they pleaded for one last penny. Perhaps my sigh was merely the echo of the voice of my sadly flattened, greatly overworked wallet. Perhaps .... When my respiration had returned to normal I swung open the main portal of Houston Junior College. I entered the hall, followed by a gust of chill, misty wind. The door slammed with a bang behind me, the noise echoing and re-echoing through the building. Throwing open my great coat, I glanced at my watch—7:10. "Odd," thought I, "is this not usually the noisiest of periods?" Proceeding further, my eyes beheld a long figure imbibing the information posted on the bulletin board. "Howdy Pete!" The president of the sophomore class turned at my greeting. His face was ashen—his pale lips parted with a weak "H'lo." What had befallen my beloved alma mater? Could they—could I—my thoughts settled on nothing plausible. Turning on my heel, I strolled back towards the library and peeped in. Save for the librarian, dozing over a book of poetry, it was empty. If you have ever been into the creepy cold stillness of a cave, you have experienced the same feeling, the same Hl-at- ease sensation that I felt. Trying, almost in vain, to overcome the .sordid, clammy atmosphere by hurrying my step almost into a run, I managed to reach the stairs, and mounted them one by one. Fearsome of what spectacle I might behold, I peered cautiously ahead of me. I saw no one until I passed the fountain; then I noticed three young women, their backs turned towards me, so that, to this day, I cannot know who they were. They spoke in an undertone, but, against the qiuet of the surroundings, I heard one distinctly say: "I danced through two pair of shoes, my dear." The mystery was solved. I ran from that building as if the devil himself was upon my heels, determined that if I did any cutting at all, it would be on the first day after the Christmas vacation. (The above is told not as a story, but merely as a narration of the Incidents that happened to me on the night of January third, nineteen hundred and thirty, at 7:10 p. m.) JOURNALISM CLASS— (Continued from Page 1) This class will meet Monday, Wednesday and Friday, from 4 to 5 p. m. Persons wishing to enroll in either class should arrange their programs so that there will be no conflict, since there is no alternate time for taking journalism. For information concerning the work in ether of these classes see Mr. Birney or Dean Dupre. BOOKLETS- I Continued from Page 1) The book must be left at the registrar's office not later than January 25 and May 25 of each year for posting, in each instance, of the grades of the preceding semester. The book will be ready for return to the student in about two weeks thereafter. A fee of 50c will be charged for making a duplicate of the book. The date of distribution of this term's grades has not been definitely decided but will be announced within a few days, Mr. Duggan said. MARRIAGE LICENSE APPLICATIONS Miss Doris Hortman, 18, and George Lanaux, 22. Miss Zelda Amdur, 18, and Jack Scott, 50. Miss Dorothy Mackey, 22, and Sir- Ettlinger, IS. Miss Celia Lesky, 14, and Mel Davis,, 20. Miss Muriel Payseur 24, and Sher- rard, Warden, 14.
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