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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 9, March 22, 1933
File 001
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 9, March 22, 1933 - File 001. March 22, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 18, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/226/show/222.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 22, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 9, March 22, 1933 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/226/show/222

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 9, March 22, 1933 - File 001, March 22, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 18, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/226/show/222.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 9, March 22, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 9, March 22, 1933
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date March 22, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR PUBLISHED.BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE HOUSTON, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22, 19S3 MOVING PICTURE SHOWS BENEFITS OFKRAFT CHEESE Shades of Beethoven; slices of Kraft. So went the Wednesday night general assembly program, the first held in three weeks. Not to be outdone by the masters of music, the H.J.C. Quartet waxed eloquent, even to the verge of tears, in its rendition of "Sweet Ado-line," and "Girl of My Dreams." The bass tuba played no mean part as assistant to the quarteters. The program was opened very earnestly to the martial strains of the "American March" played by the San Jacinto high school band. Three H. J. C. students book part in this performance. Beethoven's "Minuet in G No. 2" came next, followed by selections from Victor Herbert's capricious comedy operetta, "Mile. Modiste." Thunderous applause marked the close of this impressive part of the program, and the second half was begun amidst the whirring of machines, the shrieks of a heterogenous mob, and the violet darkness of the auditorium. A curtain was raised from the bottom of the platform, ceilingward, and the show was on that is, the movie began. Our interpreter, who sat just in back of us, very dramatically enlightened that part of the audience near him. "That's the Illinois Central," "That's Michigan Boulavard," "That's " and "That's ....," he crisply announced. The picture was shown as an introduction to the World's Fair which will be held at Chicago this year. The information most vividly portrayed, however, was that Mr Kraft, to keep merchants from eating stray bits of cheese after serving a customer, erected his factory on the site of the old Dearbon Fort so that cheese might be wrapped in sanitary packages. Quite colorful were the scenes depicting life in the old fort All in all, the World's Fair will probably be interesting if it found located as it is, somewhere back of the Kraft Cheese factory. It was during the showing of the film that the aformentioned quartet exhibited its talents . . . o say noth- of the tuba. MEN'S CLUB HOLDS TREASURE PARTY Orlo McGeath, Jim Fowler Win Novel Treasure Hunt The Guild Savant, newly organized men's club at H. J. C, opened a series of spring social functions by sponsoring a novel treasure hunt Sunday evening, March 19. Approximately twenty members of the club met at the school and were given clues to the hidden articles, two hours being allowed for finding the various treasures. The party then assembled at the home of Orlo McGeath where refreshments were served. The club has laid plans for several bay parties to be held as soon as the weather becomes warmer, expected that these parties w ate much enthusiasm among the members. At the last meeting of the club, Jimmy Fowler was accepted membership and a change in the constitution was made concerning finances. The Guild Savant meets every other Monday in Mr, Harris' room. SOPH DANCE IS SUCCESS; HELD ATCOLLEGEINN SUMMER SESSION WILL EMPLOY 14 H. J. C. TEACHERS Fourteen Junior College instructors are included in the faculty for the 1933 summer session, as announced by Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, president. These teachers will be in charge class work, provided that enrollments justify offering the courses which they offer. le following instructors are assignees to summer work: H. W. Harris, English; Warren A. Rees, mathematics; Archie W. French, government and education; Fred R. Birney, journalism; E. W. Schuman, man and physics; Mrs. Floy P. Soule, French, Spanish; L. T. Hook- biology; M. A. Miller, sociology and history; A. L, Kerbow, education; S. W. Henderson, education; S. L. Bishkin, chemistry; Miss Lula M. Stevens, public school music: Miss Pearl Rucker, public school art; and Miss Helen Steele, industrial ed ucation. Dancing for three and a half hours to the rhythmic strains of the Birmingham Blue Blowers the Coug- ophomores last Friday night staged their annual dance at Ye Olde Collge Inn and came through sporting fashion. The hall was neatly decorated in St. Patrick's Day style. Figures of Shamrocks, clay pipes, and hats hung upon the walls and windows. Green was the keynote in decoration, but every color of the rainbow was the keynote in dress. The dance brought forth a barrage of bright colors and spring apparel. Aitken, president of the Soph omore class, seemed very pleased with the result of the dance. "The dance wa3 a success," he stated, "And I hope that everyone there had an enjoyable time." The dance started promptly at ten o'clock and lasted through until about 1:00 a. m. As a whole the crowd arrived early and remained until the Blue Blowers struck the last chord of "Home Sweet Home." This dance may set a precedent for the sophomores of Houston Junior College. Heretofore the Sophomore Prom has been a formal or semi- formal affair. This Prom, a sport dance, may usher in an era of varied proms. FRENCH ISSUES BASEBALL CALL First Practice to Be Held Wednesday, March 22 Coach Archie W. French calls for the first baseball practice to be held Wednesday, March 22, with a large squad having already been signed and available for play. French states that practice will be conducted in the mornings, and due to the fact that a few of the players on the squad are working, a seasoned team can be entered in one of the local baseball leagues. Humble Park to be obtained for all practice games and equipment will be issued to candidates next week. Some of the players of proven ability out for the team include Starks Green, star catcher formerly of Tarleton College, Yates, recent Missouri Pacific shortstop, Raymond Dupree, sensational outfielder of the championship IGA Grocers of last season, Adolph Marks, pitcher for the Post team, Paul Sparks, former outfielder from Reagan High and numerous other candidates. Players may have to use their own uniforms but will be provided all other equipment necessary. All boys interested in playing baseball are urged to get in touch with Coach French as soon as possible. Women's Faculty Club Hold St. Patrick's Day Bridge Entertainment H. J. C. GIRLS WIN OVER OIL CAGERS n one of their hardest battles of the season Junior College defeated the Texas Company Girls by a score of 43 to 34. In the opening minutes the Texas team took a 5 point lead was soon passed during the second quarter. Jenny Wait was ex- imely right in all her shots scoring 14 field goals for a high score of 28 points. Avis Parks and Doris Mc- Vickers missed numerous easy shots and had they been right the score would have been much more decisive. The Junior College defense showed bsence of Cisco Kellog, flashy little grad who was unable to play. Moers and Green of the Texas Company divided scoring honors for their team with 15 points each. St. Patrick's bridge was joyed Saturday afternoon by the Woman's Faculty Club at the home f Mrs. F. L. Duggan with Mrs. N i. Dupre assisting hostess. The rooms were artistically deco' rated with Irish green and bright spring flowers. Five tables of bridge were arranged for the enjoyment of the guests. Several mem- i dropped in during the late afternoon for the social hour. An ice course was served on bridge trays. The color scheme was also carried out in the refreshments. The kes were in the shape of shamrocks. High score was a beautiful basket of flowers. Low score was small pot plant. The primary function of the club is Continued on page 2 SUMMER SCHOOL PLANS ARE MADE BYH.J.C. FACULTY Many requests for information concerning summer school classes have already been received in the office of Mrs. Pearl C. Bender, reg- strar. Classes will be offered in both sophomore and freshman courses, but all courses scheduled as announced elsewhere in this issue of Cougar will be given only in case sufficient students register for each course to justify the expense of offering the work. Classes scheduled include English, math me tics, government, physics, French, Spanish, biology, sociology, journalism, history, education, chemistry, and special courses for teachers or art, music, and industrial edu- "A total of 39 courses are scheduled at present, and will be offered if enrollments justify," N. K. Dupree, dean, said in discussing plans for the summer session. Students wishing information con- ming summer session or any of the courses to be offered should consult Mr. Bender or Mr. Dupre concerning their schedules. Fees for summer session, which will last six weeks, will be as follows: matriculation fee, $5.00; library fee, $2.00; tuition for two courses, $30.00, totaling $37.00. Students who have ever been enrolled in Junior College will not pay the matriculation fee, thus reducing their tuition to $32.00. Labratory fees for the various sciences are as follows: Chemistry, $3.75; biology, $5.00; physics, $2.50; education, $2.50; practice teaching, $7.50. Tuition for one course in the summer session is $18. New students, paying matriculation and library fees, will pay $25.00, while students not paying for matriculation will be able to take one course for $20.00, unless enrolled in courses requiring labratory fees. HUGHES TOOL WINS FROM H. J. C. TEAM The Hughes Tool volleyball team defeated Junior College in 3 out of 5 games in a thrilling contest. Staging a close race for 4 games in which each team won 2, Hughes Tool finally won the deciding game 17 to 15 after Junior College had forged ahead by a score of 15 to 14. Volleyball is steadily gaining in favor among the students and is certainly a game in which team work ia an essential element. Players participating for Junior College were Pat Foley, Bob Stallings, Ed Smart, Jesse Darling, J. J. Ross, Fred Aebi, John Hill, and Edgar Nerkin. Future games will be booked from time to time and everyone is invited and assured of an exciting game. NOTICE If you are planning on being graduated in June see Mrs. Bender or Lucille Black regarding the time of class meetings. Several social functions are being planned by the graduates. %EALL Y, NOW, IS IT LIKE THIS? GO TO HOLLYWOOD AND FIND OUT (Note: This is to give you an idea of what might happen if H. J. C. was suddenly moved to Hollywood and turned into a motion picture studio.) CHARACTERS: Mr. Dupre, president of the company; Mr. French, director (He got this position because of his spats); Harold Renfro, hero (Pfffffftl); Kitty Hurlock, female menance (Scenes in which Miss Hurlock appears must be shot with asbestos film.); James Julian, punch-drunk boxer; and James Coulson, villian. SCENE: Location on a Hollywood set. Mr. Dupree: "Ah, Mr. French, you may now proceed to shoot the first scene." Director French: "Now Miss Hurlock, remember, in this scene you are supposed to be a society girl. Now let's hear you say something in precise English. Go ahead, say something." Kitty: "Hot dog, you tell 'em kid, hot cha cha!" Director French: "Well I'll be a , say, is that what you call precise English?" Kitty: "Gee, I " James Julian: "Say, did I ever tell youse guys about the time I almost licked Dempsey? I led wit me right, and " Director French: "Yes, you've told us. Now, Miss Hurlock, go ahead and say your lines.' Kitty: "What is your name? You have the prettiest hair, and I think Director French: "Ye Gods, what is this? You don't see that in the script." Kitty: "Well, you told me to say my lines. Ask any of those H. J. C. boys if that isn't my line." Director French: "Not that! Read your lines from that paper you have in your hand." Kitty: "Once upon a time a travel ing salesman " Director French: "Oh Lord! You dope! You are reading the wrong paper." Kitty: "All right. 'Ah, alas! Look at yon forest fire approaching. I am doomed!'" James Coulson: "Aha, fair lady. It is only me. My fiery thatch is forest fire. Heh, heh, heh." Kitty: "I am still doomed. Will no one save me?" Harold Heart-throb (Played by Mr. Renfro.): "I will save you, fair maiden!" (Hamp Robinson does a tap dance Continued on page 2 GIRL CAGERS END WINNING SEASON The Junior College Girls' basketball team closed the season with their most successful campaign by winning 20 out of 23 games played. A total of 713 points were amassed by Junior College averaging 31 points per game while 304 points were scored by all opponents or an average of 14 points per game. The following players constituted the squad used in games throughout the season Avis Parks, Doris McVickers, Jenny Wait, Lou Gaines, Cisco Kellog, Evelyn Veach, Ruth Sparks, Bonnie Shelton, Lavern Lathrop, Maize Lyle, Ferguson, M. Hogan Helen Tomlin, and Lucile Waite. Avis Parks was high scorer for the season with 226 points with the other players following with: Doris McVickers 167, Jenny Wait 120, Bonnie Shelton 55, Evelyn Veach 28 and Ferguson 2. A splendid offense built around Avis Parks, Jenny Wait and Doris McVickers enabled Junior College to score almost at will in all their games. Much credit must be given to Cico Kellog, Helen Tomlin and Lou Gaines for their work during the season on the defense. Miss Irene Speiss is to be corn- Continued on page 2
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