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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930 - File 002. December 17, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/206/show/203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 17, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/206/show/203

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930 - File 002, December 17, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/206/show/203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 6, December 17, 1930
Contributor
  • Keach, Maurine
Date December 17, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR The Cougar Of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscription, $1.00 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. Edltorli Issue Editor Literary Editor .... Feature Writer Sports Reporter .... Alumni Editor Humor Editor ... Intercollegiate and Editor Faculty Advisor Staff Maurine Keach Dorothy McGraw Zelda Osborne Martin Lowe Margaret Boyett Genevieve Weldon Exchange Ferae Sweeney . . . Fred R. Birney Business Staff Managing Editor....Everett H. Kendall Circulation Manager. Harry Seaman Circulation Assistants: Jane Wither- spoon and Derward McConuell. Advertising Representatives: Kenneth C. Phillips, Maxwell Ludtke and Maurine Ed minster. Faculty Managing Editor...- „ Wallace H. Miner Chapell Freeman Beatrice Hamilton Lois Harrison Montford Inman A. C. Irwin Fay Laurence Ethel Mercer Rub ye Tunnel I Llewellyn Ross Reporters Pauline Ault Frances Baty Opal Beane Lucille Cafcalas Evelyn Cochran Wilton Cohen Gordon Davis Ruth Dermody Lois Duff Our Student Body Houston Junior College students should appreciate the excellent quality of their college. Mr, S. W. Henderson, H. J. C. professor of Education, remarked to one of his classes recently that if he were to be asked for advice by a Junior College graduate regarding an institution lor higher education, he would recomend that college which he knew to have thr best student body. "The students,' he said, "have more influence on each other than anyone else or anything else at the college can hare on them. A college known for its extremely strict discipline will draw all the boys and girls whose parents feel that they can not trust them." Of all the colleges at which Mr, Henderson has worked and of thos'i with which he has associated, H. J. C„ according to him, has the mos* exemplary student body. More than 50 per cent of our students work a:i well as go to college, and their attitude toward their college work and activities is excellent. It might be well for our students to realize that H. J. C. is the second largest public supervised junior college in the world. We should Indeed i proud of our college, and of ourselves who make the college. Former Students mlation staff has to see that the ^each former student ' Houston Junior Col- i keep in touch with are always glad to • from them at any time. The circulation department sends this message to former students who receive the paper: "The paper is supported by the students and the advertisements of our local friends among Houston business firms. We are sure you will want to bear your share of the expense. The subscription rate is (1 for The Cougar, which is issued semi-monthly. Send us your subscription; let's co-operate for a bigger and better Houston Junior College." Freshman Class Boasts of Attractive Sets of Twins Three sets of twins is the distinction the 1930 freshman class has brought to Junior College. Ola Lee and Allie Bess Collier are the two brunettes who like to ride horseback. Both graduated from Sam Houston High School in '27. Indabell and Maudiebell Smith, from the Sam Houston class of '29, are interested in athletics. Maudiebell plays on the Junior College basketball team. They attend all the college football games. The blonde twins who wear green ties on Wednesdays, are Ed and Tom Gill, who live at Goose Creek OrCott (Editor's note: Our Cutie had her picture taken. Guess who the boy is.) Hello there—How're ya? Me? Feeling no pain, thanks. Having a good time? Am I? This is one blonde boy that can certainly aance. Don't ask me who he is. You guess. He might be any of the popular boys around H. J. C. In fact, he might be the most popular boy in school, who Is, by the way, Harold Woods. But don't get me wrong, I didn't say he is. It might be Warren Lemmon. He's a blonde that can dance and how! Talk about crazy, Joe Cain is "it". Of course, it is spoken of in society as personality. Petite Coloma Powers, with that gorgeous hair, just passed me In the hall. You won't find one sweeter. Oh, palpitating heart be still! Here Is Jim Bertrand! Wouldn't you be tickled pink It you received a few words and a great big smile from Bill Jeter? I am! Well, you can't get away from it. Lucille Cafcalas is certainly a cute and peppy IT ole gal. Seems to run In the family. Phi* has a .sister, Irene, you 'member. Don't you like Boiling E. Buschardt? Golly! Hello Harvey. Oh, there goes Harvey Richards. I like him too. You don't know of nobody who don't want to hire nobody to do nothin', don't you? Vincent Artale says, "Yes, I don't." Oh—dear! Jack Thurman's grey eyes nearly get me down, but I put up a brave front and go cheerfully on my way. Fred Collins Is so nice. But not too nice. (To be taken In a nice way!) Here comes Celia Lasky. Excuse me a moment, please. I want to get the latest low-down from her. Oh, Marshall—How In the world are you? Marshall Welborne, of course. You know him. One of our football stars. COUGAR PEP CLUB TO CHOOSE ITS EMBLEMS Cougar Collegians, girls' pep club, have called for samples of club emblems and at the next meeting will select the one agreed on by populai vote as their official pin. So far, the majority of members favor a sample sent out by Sweeney's. The body of the pin is oblong, with a crouching cougar in bas-relief at the top, and the letters at the bottom. Both the pen and the guard are yellow gold plated. In the past, pep club members were identified by their blue* and white blazers. However, since the membership has increased so greatly It Is difficult to obtain enough blazers for everyone. Then, too, some of the members contend that the colors do harmonize with their dresses and since the coats can't be worn often, It is thought the pins would be more suitable. Albert Busch Dies The Cougar extends its sympathy to Fritz A. Busch in the death of his father, Albert Busch. Mr. Busch died in his home at 1901 Noble Sunday night, December 7. For two months he had suffered from heart disease. Fritz is a hard-working freshman at Junior College this year, and we hope that he can continue his studies. DEBATING CLUB HEAD IS SAVED BY PROF HARRIS Fake accusations enabled the Oratorical Associations to gain some practice in' prosecution and defense at the meeting of the association held Monday night, December 1. The "practice" charges were as follows: Mr. Harris, the club's sponsor, directed Joe Ed Winfree and Harvey Richards to accuse Harold Steele, president of the asociation, with an effort ta forfeit a debate to South Park Junior College of Beaumont. According to the accusation, an old friend of Mr. Steele's from Idaho was on the Beaumont team. He had arranged to give Harold $25 if the latter would get two of the judges to give their decisions to South Park. Harold had successfully completed these negotiations when his plot was discovered by Miss Genevieve Weldon. Faced by the threatened disaster of being expelled from Junior College, he arose in protest. In his defensive speech he denied the charges, implicating Miss Weldon in the plot. With that, the storm broke. Howard Graham rose to the defense of Miss Weldon, who, of course, was innocent. The rest of the members sided for and against the two parties to the "crime," and heavy artillery went into action. Pete Garrison and Brooks Davis proved their ability in the defense of the two. After more than an hour of accusations and counter-accusations, with all the students in dead earnest, Mr. Harris called for order and announced the innocence of Mr. Steele and Miss Weldon, explaining that it was all planned in fun. This broke up one of the most exciting club meetings ever held in Junior College. Varied Subjects Covered In Wealth of New Books Lately Added to Library Approximately S1000 worth of new books, covering every field except fiction, have been added to the library. Among the most interesting books on psychology and sociology is "Five Hundred Criminal Cases" by Gluik. This should appeal to all students interested in criminology. On the history list are three new books on Mussolini and several biographies of historical characters; "Woodrow Wilson, Life and Letters," by Baker, is particularly interesting. Two new books on radio have been received—and while mentioning science, we must not forget math books. Some of them are anything but "cut and dry" texts." The new literature books are not so numerous, but they include poetry, the short story, and the social life of various periods. Sophomore English students should remember that the "Travels of Sir John Mandeville" now in the library. Since no fiction has been received, it is certain that all contributions of good fiction by students will he appreciated by the whole student body. STUDENT SUBMITS POEM FOR H. J. C. SCHOOL SONG The following Is a song to be sung to the tune of Betty Co-ed, with words by Philip Allen, who submits his c position to the Cougar as a suggestion for a school song: Cougars fight until the finish. Smash that line with mighty force Take that ball right through their defense— ^^^ Another gain and then we have a score. Win or lose, we're still behind you, But Cougars, fight until that whistle blows Take that ball right on to victory, And then we've won the game from them, you know. —Philip Allen. ANOTHER ONE ON THE SCOTCH A Scotchman who had just received a letter from the postman began to shout with joy. "Did you receive good news in the letter?" he was asked. "I have not opened the letter," he replied. "But the postmaster forgot to cancel the stamp." BARRELS of FUN Jo Ed Winfree: "Did you make the debating team?" Milford Smith: "N-n-no. They s-s- asJd I w-w-wasn't t-t-tall enough." Mr. Bishkin: "What is the most outstanding contribution that cbemts- y has gfven to the world?" Mr. Vanzee: "Blondes." Opal Beane: "Don't you think sheep are the most stupid creatures living?" Harwood Stanaker (absent mind- edly): "Yes, my lamb." Mrs. Keach: "What made you stay so late? Have a fiat tire?" Maurine (dreamily): "No, Mother, I'd hardly call him that." Foreman (to applicant) ::"Yes, I'll give you a job sweeping and keeping the place clean." Bill Jeter: "But I'm a college boy. Foreman: "Well, then maybe you better start on something simpler." Maurie Anderson: "Why don't you like girls?" Martin Lowe: "They're too biased. Maurie Anderson: "Biased?" Martin Lowe: "Yes—bias this, and bias that, until I'm broke." O'Dowd: Say, Tom, what would you call a guy who runs an automobile?" Tom Studdert: "Well, it would depend on how near he comes to hitting me, Cora." Mr. Kerbow: "Didn't I tell you not to let me catch you doing that again?" Fred Mosk: "Yes, Prof." Mr. Kerbow: "Then why did you do that?" Fred Mosk: "Because I did not think you would catch me." Harvey Bacon: "That Bobbie McCullough is no tightwad." Buddy Workman: "No?" Harvey Bacon: "No. He just told one of the Siamese Twins he'd take her to lunch—if she could get away." I Mrs . Davis: "How long did that young man stay last night?" Helen Lee: "Oh, Ma, don't bother me with petty matters." Oh, no, dear, I'm sure he's kind. I just heard him say,he put his shirt on a horse which was scratched." Eleanor Stanfield: "Weren't you frightened when the lifeguard took so long in reaching you?" Lucille Cafcalas: "Waa,I? I almost gave up and started swimming." Irwin Urbantke: "Here is a cigar which you can offer to anybody." Jack Sikes: "No, thanks, I want one which I can smoke myself." Baxter Moody: "You didn't expect to see me here tonight, did you?" Ferae Sweeney's little brother: "Naw, Sis didn't put your picture on tho piano till after you rang the doorbell." H. D. Matthews (Sopb): "Come on, take a bath and get cleaned up. I'll get you a date." Charles Warren (Frosh), cautiously: "Yeah, and suppose you don't get the date." Miss Thomason: "Can you use the word 'satiate' in a sentence? Richard Macfee: "I took Lee Fran- to lunch today, and I'll say-she- him I can't see him, I'm sick." AHyne Allen (at ball game): "I don't see how that umpire manages to keep cool." C. (Teh) Warden: "That's easy. There are a thousand fans around him." Gus" Meyers: "I feel like 30 cents." Clifford Whitehead:- "Well, everything is higher than it used to be." And there is the poor fellow who got a shoe shine and then remembered that he had on his roommate's Harold Wood went to school proudly showing a quarter that he said he had found in the street. "Are you sure it was lost?" Phyllis Workman asked. "Yes, I know it was. I saw a man looking for it." JUST LIKE A GIRL Gladys Jacobs: What's Mary George mad about? Gladys Kyrkendall: She showed her diary to a number of girl friends and made them promise not to tell anyone what they read. Gladys J.: Yes. Gladys K.: Well, they all kept their promise. DEAD Sam Kalmans: She was a suicide blonde. Jim Bertrand: "What do you mean? Sam Kalmans: Dyed by her own Mrs. Harris: I want to do some shopping today, dear, if the weather is favorable. What does the paper Rain, hail, thunder, a 'Detour—Toll ate." Scotch Road Sign: Bridge Ahead." Mr. Miner: "When was Rome built?" Fred Aebi: "At night." Mr. Miner: "Who told you that?" Fred Aebi: "You did. Yon said that Rome wasn't built in a day." A Scotchman, In planning his new home, left the roof off one room. A friend asked the reason for this. "Oh, that's the shower," replied the Scotchman. Servant: "The doctor's here, sir." Absent-minded Profesor: "Tell Mr. Harris lightning. ] SHOCKING Adele Drenkle: Mr. Henderson, do you ever get shocked? Mr. Henderson: Yes, but you would be surprised at what causes it. If a hen laid an orange, what would her chickens say? "Se the orange marmalade!" A STICKER A haughty lady had just purchased postage stamp at a substation. "Must I stick it on myself?" she asked. 1'PosItively not, madam,1" replied the postal clerk. "It will accomplish more if you stick it on tbe letter." le men smile in the evening; Some men smile at dawn; But the man worthwhile Is the man who can smile When his two front teeth are gone. SOCKED! Opal Beane: I can get into any entertainment with my face as a ticket. "Peet" Garrison: Yes, but some day they're going to punch tickets, NO SALT H. D. Matthews: Why do you call your girl Dandruff? George Hughes: Because she's always falling on my neck. IN THE RAW Mr. Nigro: Now, Albert, can you give me a sentence using the word "avail?" Albert Kindel: Sure. The cops pinched the stag party because one of the oriental dancers was dancing without a veil. —Service. A BRIGHT FRESHMAN Sophomore: Why does a Scotchman carry bis wife's false teeth around in his pocket all day? Answer me that Freshman: That's easy. So she can't eat between meals. SUFFERING SINGERS Tenor Singer: I noticed many in the < audience weeping while I sang, "MyJ Old Kentucky Home." Are you froai' Kentucky? . . Voice from Audience: No, we'i'e all singers.
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