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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930 - File 001. December 17, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 10, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/206/show/202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 17, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/206/show/202

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930 - File 001, December 17, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 10, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/206/show/202.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 6, December 17, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 6, December 17, 1930
Contributor
  • Keach, Maurine
Date December 17, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students ot the Houston Junior College HOUSTON. TEXAST"WEDNESDAY7DECEMBER 17, 1930 COUGAR ORATORS CHOSEN TO DEBATE TEXAS UNIVERSITY Elimination Meet Held in the College Auditorium On Monday Night TEN DEBATERS TRY OUT Harris and Johnson Serve as Judges for the Team In the Meet Budding Cougar orators tried out Monday night, December 13, for tbe honor of representing Houston Junior College in a debate with the Texa3 University team after the holidays. The following debaters were selected: First team, Milfot'd Smith, Harvey Richards and Jo Ed Winfree; second team, Aaron Tapick and Albert Gordon Jones. Coach Harvey W. Harris of H. 3. C. and Coach Lyndon B. Johnson of (Continued on Page 3) BE ON TIME SAYS M^CALLA OF PRESS Tells H. J. C. Journalists That Make-up of Newspaper Is Important Kenneth McCalla, news editor for the Houston Press, addressed the 6 o'clock journalism class of Houston Junior College Friday evening. According to Mr. McCalla, one. of the most important things that ni paper work teaches one is to be on time. There is no time for delay. When a reporter is told to do a certain task immediately, be soon learns that it was not meant to be done few minutes later. He said that newspaper work is very hard, work being started at 6:30 a.m. with no definite lime to quit. Mr. McKalla said that newspaper work is very fast and that if people in other professions worked as fast, they would have three days a week for work and three for play. The general impres- son that once a newspaper man, always one, is false according to Mr. McCalla, although he said it is one of tho most fascinating professions of life, and that one has a chance of coming in contact with people from every walk of life, more so than in any other way. He said that much thought must be given to the writing and making up of the paper, as these things attract the public's attention. Aa people do not have a half day to spend reading the stories, they must be in short, concise and condensed form. From his observation in this work, people prefer current events to history, and the average reader will subconsciously buy a 'paper that is attractive. A good picture is worth three times that amount of space given over to a story, and pictures tell the stories much more effectively. Sure-Footed? Sure Fly-walking has become a new feature between classes at H. J. C. as illustrated by the human fly, Fay Jean Lawrence, here last week. Harold Lloyd may be good when it comes to fly-walking, but Fay Jean has it all over him, because she dared to climb out of a window in a class room onto a narrow ledge that runs along the front of the school building. This acrobatic stunt took place at the beginning of a 6 o'clock class, when Fay Jean entered the room where several other students were. The daring young miss was suddenly seized by some wild idea because before the class was assembled she had climbed out of the window onto a narrow part of the building, two stories above the ground. This was a fly in a glass cage, because as soon as she had left the room, a member of the class immediately pulled the window down, and this left her clinging onto the glass with plenty of space to fall behind her. The excitement of the class by this time had reached a hilarious point and was even greater when Mr. Birney, the instructor, entered the room, and requested that the window be kept closed. Miss Lawrence has not definitely decided on her next publicity stunt, but she is positive that it will not include fly- walking. GOOD WORK SHOWN IN TEQKLASSES J. A. Herrington Exhibits the Work of Star Pupils at College Even mechanical drawing and kinematics classes have their star pupils, according to Professor J. A. Herring- ton, instructor in those subjects at Houston Junior College. When questioned as to whether or not he had any star pupils, Professor Herrington enthusiastically replied: "Star pupils? Why, sure, lots of 'em!" To verify his statement, he consulted the familiar "little black book," and read a list of ten or more names, foremost of which were those of w. T. Richard and J.Workman, mechanical drawing, and Messrs. Booker and Graham, kinematics. Exhibiting pleasure in the interest shown by the reporter, Professor Her- ington pointed proudly to a number of neat plates on the walls of the drawing room, explaining that each student completed approximately 24 similar plates during the semester. "In addition to that," the professor added, "we have a test and about 25 pages of outside reading every LOUIS GUBBLES LEAVES FUNDS TO COLLEGIANS Because Louis Gabbles requested that his unused tuition fee be given to a worthy cause, The Cougar Col- * legian treasury" was increased ?9.0(L, according to Genevieve Weldon, club treasurer. Mr. Gubbles, formerly of Rosenberg 'High School, attended Houston Junior College until some few weeks ago, when he secured a position with an toil company and left for South \America. T^Be'ng considered the most worthy organization at Hopston Junior Collie, the Pep Club was given the money i'y Mr. J. H. Ledlow, registrar. MANY NEW MEMBERS ADDED TO PEP CLUB Honors in the membership contest between the Blue and White teams o! the girls pep club go to tho Blues who gained the most members. The new members added to the organization are: Mauris Anderson, Gladys Jacobs, Dorothy McGraw, Frances Baty, Bernice Branum, Bessie Robins, Henrietta Sokolsky, Jane Wltherspoon, Mary Owen Black, Mildred Cramer, Mary G. Harris, Madolyn Mc. Graw, Louise Morgan, and Etlene Ross. The White team will entertain the winning team at a party fn the near future. A treasure ship can't come in unless you first send one out. STORY OF PROGRESS OF H. J. C. TOLD BY THE POST-DISPATCH Newspaper Devotes Entire Page to Story of Growth of Junior College MANY ILLUSTRATIONS USED Discusses Advisability of Public Support of These Institutions Progress of Houston Junior College was played up in a special feature story by Miss Bess Whitehead Scott in last Sunday's magazine seclion of the Houston PosMM spatch!. "Junior College is unique in its accomplishments and rating among jun- ior colleges of the South," stated -Miss Scott. "It has accomplished all Its original objectives. Its purpose is to provide means for working people to acquire the first two years of college training at home." "In four years 250[i students have (Continued on Page 3) CHRONICLE WRITERS SPEAK AT COLLEGE Mr. and Mrs. Ed Rider Give Valuable Pointers on Journalism That it is possible for two good newspapermen to be in the same family is proved by Mr. and Mrs. Ed Rider, both of whom write for the Houston Chronicle. Mr. and Mrs. Rider addressed the sophomore journalism class of Junior College on feature, short story, and sports writing Wednesday night. "I have always prided myself on being a good 'newspaper man', and it takes that attitude and plenty of enthusiasm to carry a woman through the newspaper game," stated Mrs. Rider who writes theatre and radio news for the Chronicle. The greatest value in feature writing, according to Mrs. Rider, is the ability to get a story when one is assigned. Never return empty handed. Having sold several short stories, it Is her opinion that most beginners write "over their head". Her advice to would-be writers is to observe situations and study people, and to decide the type of story and the kind of magazine to write for before beginning. In discussing news feature writing, Mr. Rider, staff correspondent for the Chronicle, stated that it is the most Interesting phase of newspaper work and the most popular with readers. "But," he added, "there is danger of becoming warped on the idea of feature writing. A feature article should always deal with action and not in- (Contiuued on Page 3) Jazz Peps Up Class "Public utilities, 10 per cent interest, unearned increment, tum-te-dada—" Mr. Miller's sophomore economics class took their regular six weeks quiz Monday night to an obligato of lively music *by the San Jacinto band which was practicing at the same time. If any of them were trying to use "quiz helps," they hastily concealed them when the band struck up "The Eyes of Texas Aro Upon You." One student, who had trouble keeping his feet still while writing about price levels, suggests that it might be a good Idea to combine economics and dancing lessons, thus killing two birds with one dance tune. 'Unto the Least—' What is life for a six-year-old chid of ignorant, destitute par- A Cougar reporter knows just such a little girl, and gives his impression of her view of life if she were to tell It: "Hungry? I'm always hungry. And my baby brother and two little sisters cry 'cause they're hungry. "Sometimes mother brings in a little food. It never lasts long, and then we're hungry again. When we cry, mother sometimes just looks at us and doesn't say anything. Daddy. too, just sits and looks at us— especially since he got his hand hurt at the cotton mill. "I'm glad I've got my dolly, Raganna, that the kind.faced lady gave me. The lady told me about a land—way off, I guess—where boys and girls don't cry because they're hUn* gry, and they have clean clothes, and toys and everything. I guess it isn't really true though, 'cause she said they have big yards to play in, that are not muddy and filled up with tin cans and weeds. I guess there isn't any place without weeds, and mud and dirty waier when it rains." A long time ago One lived who told of a remedy for human woe. He said: "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one ot the least of these, my brethren, ye have Hone' it unto me." MODERN EDUCATION IN NEW TREND SAYS DR. GEORGESTRAYER Famous Educator Speaks On Modern Development in Training Youth ABILITY OF IMPORTANCE Success Measured by Amount Of Satisfaction Found In Employment "The world has a fashion of getting out of the road of a man who knows where he is going," said Dr. George '. Strayer of Columbia University in addressing the faculty and student body of Junior College fn the auditorium Wednesday evening, November 26. Three speeches and a duck bunt were on the day's program for Doctor Strayer before he addressed the night school students. He is touring the country, making speeches on his favorite subject, education. Directors >f the institution siezed the opportu- (Continued on Page 3) LIBRARY'S SYSTEM DEFINED IN LECTURE Mrs. Hannah Shearer Lectures On Value of Library to Students In order to familiarize students with the library and aid them in serving themselves, Mrs. Hannah Shearer, Houston Junior College librarian, gave a lecture recently on the arrangement and uses of the library to Freshmen and Sophomore English classes. "The Junior College library uses the Dewey Decimal System. That is, books are arranged numerically ac- cording to subject matter," explained Mrs. Shearer. She then discussed book classifications, their numbers, and where they are found in the tf- brary. The author, subject neading and title cards of every book In the library are alphabetically arranged and catalogued. Students were shown which card drawers to use when (Continued ou Page 3) STUDENTS HEAR RECITAL AT ASSEMBLY MEETING Piano music was an attraciive feature at the regular Wednesday night assembly. The artists were Mrs. Charles A. Hall and Miss Maxine Jeanes, who rendered the following numbers: Weiner Bon Bon, by Mile Rive-King; a Suite for Two Pianos, which consisted of romance and waltz melodies, composed by Arensky; the old popular number, Turkey in the Straw, and two piano numbers written by David Gyon, a native Texan. The recital was well received by the students and Mr. Henderson thanked the artists for their part in the program and Invited them to come again in the- near future to entertain the students. The announcement of note for the evening was the one concerning the address to be given by O'Brien Stevens, criminal district attorney, next Wednesday night at the regular assembly. Other minor announcements concerned college activities, and the graduation of students in June. COUGAR SHOULD USE BOTH NEWS AND WIT Prominent Co-Ed Gives Views Of What Student Paper Should Contain "Wise-cracks" exclusively or a few intelligent constructive news Items scattered in with the jokes? That is the question that has been before the minds of The Cougar staff this year. Interviewing a popular co-ed, who stands high in her classes, a reporter received the following statement of her opinion regarding the content's of The Cougar: "Most college students consider themselves strictly modern. And, of course, being modern, we demand an up-to-date paper. "According to the opinions of some, such a paper should be crammed with 'hot' jokes, and wise-cracks by famous 'wise-crackers.' This group of sophisticates confess a. bored distaste for anything having a trend toward the literary. "I wouldn't call such an attitude modern. It certainly isn't broad. Is just stubbornly narrow, r ber, that when an outsit oping college paper, he base1" sock."— the college, itself, upon and strength reflected in i of the paper. "I, therefore, feel that it is absolutely necessary to print material that will tend to uphold the higher standards of the college, and thus intensify her prestige in the minds of the public." SANTA POPULAR ON H. J. C. CAMPUS Santa Claus came very near being the most popular boy in the H. J. C. "Popular Boy" contest held recently, but Harold Wood managed to nose the good old saint out by a few votes, thereby winning the prize dinner at San Jacinto Cafe. Herbert Hoover also polled a heavy vote for popularity among the students. The other winners, each of whom had the privilege of partaking of the cafe's chili, were Mack Daugherty, Howard Graham, and Pete Garrison. Receiving favorable mention were Albert Ktndel, Martin Lowe, Warren Lemmon, Donald McKibben, Mai Ludke, Soap McGinty, Terry Russell, Jlmmie Bertrand, Willard Nesmith, Dan Foster, Harold Steele, Kenneth Phillips, Fred Collins, Joe Peabody, Roy Teinert, Bob McCullough, and Fred Stark.
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