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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929
File 003
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 003. December 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/194

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 003, December 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 2, December 1929
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date December 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript TH E COUGAR <ijr$> Some Efforts From the Literati e^> FOREWORD A recent assignment on "The College Flivver" made by Mr. Birney to his class in feature writing, unearthed a number of literary gems, some of which are printed below. In view of the number of "collegiate flivvers" now in use at Junior College, It is believed that these stories will be of interest to Cougar readers. An Auto-biography of a Collegiate Flivver —Mrs. P. B. Nagel. She knows you should ride In the Old I For he'd bought a big car arid a Span- College Flivver. ish style home, Though instead of payin' up, he'd paid down. So he lorded it over the office Until I got tired of his whim An' told him I was tired—then he said I was fired, X learned about bosses front him. By GEORGE LANAUX Woe i Seven short years ago I made my bow to the public. Seven short years ago I was a sparkling new flivver, but to look at me now, no one would think that I have known better days. It brings joy to my pulsing carburetor to look back upon that summer of '22 when I enjoyed the thrill of carrying no less a personage than his honor, the mayor, on his frequent tours of the city. But my days among the city's great were numbered, and it was a year before the mayor forsook me for a car of much higher price, which, I assure you, did not fill that gentleman's quirements one jot or tittle better than I. My next duty, although the work was devilish hard, was one in which I displayed my great ability in serving the public. The man for whom I slaved operated a filling station, and it was I who brought gas and tires to cars in distress. The causo was a worthy one—I served It faithfully for five thankless years, and then, my sparkle dulled, my frame weakened, my lights dimmed by the ceaseless toil, I was sold: I, exchanged for a paltry handful of glittering silver pieces. My cup indeed is bitter. The one who bought me was—Oh God! he was a college man. My worthy radiator bows in shame—I am an object of pity, but am I pitied? Not in the least, and why: all because this drooling idiot of a college man insists on painting me a dozen different colors, any one of which would madden a bull, and, too, he will affix to me articles long cast away as junk and ranging from cow bells to various young ladies' garters. To top It all, he goes so far as to print signs upon me the very nature of which make me an object of scorn to provoke mirth among those who ogle as I pass— that, my friends, is the deepest cut of all. One sign across my right front, stolen no doubt from some public rest room, reads "LADIES," and on the opposite door has been scrawled "LEAP IN, LIMP OUT," as much as to suggest that the parties I convey do not ride in absolute safety and comfort. Ah me! The day none to soon when for the last time I shall crash my noble self into a nearby pole, from thence onward to rest and rust In the peaceful confines of some happy home for sundry and odd junk. THE COLLEGE FLIVVER By Frances Foster In the year 1900, there was born Henry Ford's domicile, Detroit, Mich., a maiden whose name was Henrietta Elizabeth Ford. Henrietta Elizabeth Ford was a beautiful child. Her complexion was as smooth as satin her features were perfect. But time went on, as time will do, and in about thirty years Henrietta Elizabeth Ford was no longer a beautiful, popular damsel. No longer was she wanted. Men shunned her. Women ridiculed her. Her best friend wouldn't tell her that she was full of creaks. Says Miss Ford, "My dear, I was r. wreck. I mean, I really was. I mean, I was weak and run down; 1 had no pep, no vitality. Then, I read in the paper that some college boys were looking for some cbeap vehicle to push around the football field. "To make a long story short, I went to the home of a great orator, Roy Hoffheinz, and asked him if there waa an opening for me. He talked about two hours and I gathered that he meant if the team pulled for me and I for the team, I would get the place. "How thrilled I was. Mr. James Bute gave me eighty samples of paint and Mr. Kress gave me four umbrel- 1 made a dress of the paint and carried the umbrellas. (By the way, . Bute didn't give me any red pink paint. This reddish and pinkish tint is due to a permanent blush hich I received this summer when four young men clad in pajamas ve me all over town.) Anyway, here I am today. A popular youngster again. After all it isn't the chassis, it's the paint that makes v. woman." Expressing these fine statements of hope for the woman of thirty, Henrietta Elizabeth Ford swayed down the avenue to the tune of "Yo-Yo- Yolng All Day Long." bard-boiled old duf- They flew over their own fair land, They flew with greatest care; O' cautious were these pilots three, For their voyage to prepare. At last, when plans and plane were done And the pilots so gaily clad. They bade farewell to the Fatherland dear, The next ■ fer, Until I had learned all his ways. Then he got mild, an' sweet as a child. An' never said nothin' hut praise. An' because Iworked hard and steady He helped me get in the swim; Showed me the way to promotion and pay An' I learned about bosses from So I've taken my jobs where I've found 'em; The punk ones along with the best; An' the things that I've learned into use I have turned i' they've helped me along with the rest. For the more that you know about all men The easier It is to please one; They are all kin, and under the skin Each wants to be thought the big Leaving their friends quite Their wide country was a Far from the deep blue sea So they soared above the steep O'er many a v iLe country. At 1 : they reached the blue Atlan tic, Saw the land fast They went fast toward the seeing sun. Undaunted by any fear. They flew for hours through fog and rain; They flew both high and low- Not once their courage true did fail, They conquered every foe. wide country they THE COLLEGE FLIVVER All over the campus, parked here and parked there Is the Old College Flivver, with never a care That boats that are bigger and sweller and better Are close on the curb, to this little go-getter. THE BOSSES (More than the Usual to Kipling; >e taken my jobs where I've found I've drudged an' I've played in each I've had my pick o' positions An' three o' the lot was great fun. One was a stockbroker's office; One was a place in a bank; An' one was a real estate company, 'Twas there that I found the most swank. Now I wan't a good judge o' bosses When I first started out In the fight, For you never can tell till you've tried An' then you're most likely not right There's times when you think that you know 'em, There's times when you're mighty perplexed. But the things that you learn trom each one in turn In turn They'll help you a lot with the next. The Song of the Zeppelin i. In a Teuton country far over the sea Lived an aged captain bold; This sire conceived a great idea— The story has often been told. II. With eager heart and ready hand He watched by day and hour. The construction of the good Graf Zep-pelin> A plane of greatest power. III. The construction of the great Graf Zeppelin Was wrought with every care; For it was the heart's desire of the captain That it over the world should fare. IV. At last the workman's deed was done And in that far off land, Stood the Zeppelin, gigantic plane! Looking so large and grand. V. O'er many a soared, O'er many a land and clime. They saw grand sights most v drous, In a few swift moments' time. At last the momentous flight In the homeland they came down Great perils they had met and faced Eternal fame they had found. —Mary Louise Pearce. present head of the household, which includes Gran, a formidable old lady of 99, two uncles, an aunt, an elder sister, and four half-brothers, 'they are an alfectlonaie. warring group ot personalities from the old lady down to Wakefield, the youngest, aged nine. Two of tiie boys marry and bring their wives home. The coming of the second b,!le. an American, ailects each one uf the clan for happiness or pain; and onver.Dly, for Alayue, th.3 months at Jains, are crowded with sharp expv.'i -nces of bitterness or delight and wnen she goes, the problem of her love for Ronnie and his for her only par'.'ally ;-oived It is a portrayal of a dozen hardy egotists nagging, fighting, adoring each other. They are extremely live characters and very amusing ones. They are not effective individually or even as a group of individuals, but as family. It is a beautiful and engrossing tory, and singularly rich in background. The faults are those of generosity: too much material, too many characters, and an enioarrassment of incident. ■aptain chose compan- Then the stern ions, Of his countrymen bold and free; Tgoether these three so carefully planned To fly forth over the sta. They tested the plane in many, many For a flaw in any nook; 0, cautious were these pilots three, E're their great flight they took. Use of our best friends, books, will make a happy 1930 MRS. H. H. SHEARER. SOME BOOK REVIEWS "JALNA," By MAZO DE LA ROCHE FRANCES WILLARD "Jalna," by Mazo de la Reche is the book that won the 510,000 prize in the Atlantic Monthly contest for the most interesting novel. Prize-winning novels are usually insipid nd painfully new In style. "Jalna" comes as a surprise for it is unique and intensely interesting. Jalna is the family home of the Whiteoaks. Gathered under its roof are representatives of each generation from the time the grandparents drifted to Canada, via England, from India, and there built their homestead on a lavish scale. Rennie, 37, is COMPLIMENTS OF The Capitol News Stand 1102 Capitol Ave. Charles Pangarakis, Owner Passante's Groceries 2215 WEST DALLAS CLINTON ROAD I first went to ) handsome nplex, we blame its ef- nlsfits and a lot of the t wreck that got that Inferiority col fects For a lot of i wrecka, But she is i way By a happier route that was reckless and gay. Her poise is superb, when she's parked in the back Of a Packard or front of a big Cadil- She knows that it takes her, the goods to deliver And she's ahTiply not bothered, the Old College Flivver. She knows she hasn't missed making the gradi Sho knows her coat lays Josephs' coat In the shade. And if what you need is to wake up the II' vork for a lawyer, and black-eyed and He had quite a way with the ladies An' thought he could capture 'em all. I kne-.v I'd be leavin' there shortly. For I don't like that Rind of film, But I counted it valuable practice For I learned about bosses from him. An' then was a high-hatted banker, Who officed from ten until one. But the work that he gave me the while he was there Kept me busy till set of the sun. He thought that no people were counted Unless they were rich, old and grim; So I gave up the place—he was off o' his base, But L learned about bosses from him. An' one had just come from the country; Thought he was tha chief man in town. Compliments of the TEXAS BLUE PRINT & SUPPLY CO. 1013 Capitol Ave. Between Fannin and Main Phone Preston 4907 and 4908 "gaISe^ Vrrrri ,r-r-rr-! BARRY'S American Shoe Shop Geo. Wilkes, Prop. ALL THE LATEST MAGAZINES CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND CANDY Phone Preston 5931 1120 Capitol Ave. WOOD & PURDY SPORTING GOODS COMPANY Athletic Outfitters :: Felt Emblems and Penants Made to Order Hunting and Fishing Supplies 1317 Capitol Avenue Phone Capitol 2613 POST OFFICE PHARMACY 1124 Capitol Avenue Phones: Fairfax 1480-3820-67S3 Light Lunches —- Special Toasted Sandwiches Chili and Tamales Prompt, Efficient Service to Students Naturally Houston Turns to Munn's lor Christmas Gilts .... The Store with the Christmas Spirit
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