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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 002. December 1929. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 17, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 1929). The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/193

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929 - File 002, December 1929, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 17, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/196/show/193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 3, No. 2, December 1929
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. III, No. 2, December 1929
Contributor
  • Shepperd, Louise
Date December 1929
Language English
Description From masthead: "A monthly newspaper devoted to the interests of Houston Junior College. Published by the Journalism Department, Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR A monthlv newspaper devoted to th< Interests of Houston Junior College. Pub- lished by the Journalism Depart ment Houston Junior College. EDITORIAL STAFF Louise Sbeoperd Editor-in-Chief Margaret Boyel i Assistant Kdltur Denis Snelgl Make-ui> Helen Cheney Activity Doris Hart man Humor Robert Tr.i. ej Sport F. R. Birney Advisor FEATPRE WRITERS George Lanaux Kram-rs K"*t* Mrs. P. B Nagel j m Oormai Frances Wlllaid Celia Leaky REPORTERS Ivaliie Mi. ■ Margaret Tabany Kflilit Am h I...in ii Grant Mary Adele Cobb Jane Wllhersiioon R. E. Neil Harold Summerlln Mauiee Anderson Uyce spilman Fred Mills Maurlne Edmlnslet BUSINESS Harold Wood Assistant Mnnagcr WUma T.eman Typist ADVERTISING Celia Leaky Manager W. H. Miner. Virginia Rainbolt Assistant Managers This Thing of Good Manners To talk of good manners to people of college age ought to be unnecessary—that kind or thing should have been learned back in kindergarten days. But the rudeness qf a few students during the last few weeks seems to indicate that at least some of them seed to be taught a few manners. Perhaps these students are just thoughtless. Maybe they really know better. We hope so. Hut, often so, for their own good they should have these things called to their attention; they should be brought to realize that both teacher and other students will judge them by these discourtesies, and not only they, but their families, will be censured. Especially discourteous are those ■students who come in to the cafeteria at the end of a long line, cut In ahead of others, and take p'aces near the head of the line. Of course, not a great deal of harm Is done those who have been displaced—a few more ahead don't make such a lot of difference in time—but it is irritating to have waited some ten or fifteen minutes at the end of a long line only to have others rush in late and take places near the front as if they were the only ones to be considered. Such selfishness is disgusting. Then there are the students who congregate in the halls near the open doors of busy classrooms. They fill the air with such shouting and laughing that it is often impossible to hear what is going on in the c'assroom. Just another exhibition of thoughtlessness, or ill-breeding, or whatever you want to call it. And last, but not, least are those students who seem to want to drown out every word spoken by the teacher during the class period. No matter how interesting or important the lecture or discussion may be, these students insist on carrying on their own petty conversations whenever they so desire. All that childishness ought to be put away now. You're not babies. You're of college age. Act it. You'll soon be out in the world on your own (if you're not already) and if you ever want to get anywhere you'd better learn to consider other folks sometimes. You'll be a grand flop if you don't. And they you'll whine about somebody else getting all the breaks. It's up to you, brother (or sister). Take your choice! LeCs Have Some Pep By DORIS HORTMAN What's the matter? Dead and don't know It! that's the trouble. Listen, you students of Junior College! We've got to have P. E. P. to keep this school going and where is it coming from? It's got to come from the Btudent body. This peplessneas on your part la caused by lack of interest. You not interested in the Cougar—you aren't interested In Junior College football; you aren't interested in Junior College dances—you aren't Interested in any of the clubs—in fact, you aren't interested In Junior College. This is a plea for enthusiasm, pep —anything that remotely resembles life Exchange The Abilene High Battery of Abilene, Texas, sends us a nice newsy paper. It is also well organized. The paper lacks humor, which is rather essential to any school paper. It has many writeups of interest and importance in it. The news is not only of [he school but outside factors too. We've enjoyed it lots. Let us hear i'rom you again soon. Here's a little verse found in the paper—don't mind that, Freshmen!! Disillusion f stood upen a mountain, And looked out on the pain, I saw a lot of green stuff, That, looked like growing grain, So I took another look at it, I thought it must be grass. But goodness to my horror, It was only "The Freshman Class!" —Exchange. The Bay Window of the Muskegon Junior College Is an excellent paper put out semi-monthly. The front page is rather monotonous in its regularity of the topic placement. There is one column under the head of "Library" which gives a literary criticism with each publication. This should prove very beneficial and would be a good thing if more papers had something of the same nature included in them. There is some rare humor In this little paper, some real humor. Here are just a few of them: Hay: "Do you file your nails?" Stalk: "No, I just cut them and throw them away." Then there is the Scotchman who boiled his potatoes iu sea water *o save salt. Mr. Harris: "I see that there are some book-worms in school this year." Catheryn Meyers: "Why don't they spray the place with Flit?"—(Adv.) —Exchange. The Viking hails from a school way elf in Long Beach. Calif. Long Beach Junior College. It is an interesting little paper In spite of the lack of humor. One page entirely is de- ted to athletics, with numerous cartoons included in it. The arrange- ient of the first page Is, though not unusual, a little hit different from that of the usual school paper. We like it as well as the news contained in it. Here is a sample of some of the humor: Teacher: "Robert, your essay on 'My Mother' was just the same as your brother's." Robert: "Yes, sir, we have the same [other." "They call him Luke because he is ot so hot!" The Mountaineer is a nice paper printed by the Schrelner Institute at Kerrvllle, Texas. It has a very attractive front page arrangement. The paper, however, may be improved with the addition of some humor. It would keep it from being quite dry. Try using a little of the space occupied with ads for jokes. A few of the local quotations of the paper that might prove useful to us as well as being clever are: "Let's not be asses; let's not e be mules." Don't kid about safety. You may be the goat.—Exchange. The Purple Pup is a well-edited paper put out by the Sidney Lanier Junior High School, Houston, Texas The paper has quite a varied selection of writeups concerning the news ot the school. It has a lot of good humor. Just a few instances are: "McTab is a resourceful old Scotch- "What has he done now?" "The doctor told him he had sugar in his tears so he cries over his corn flakes every morning." OH, FIREMAN! FIREMAN! SPREAD YOUR NET OR * * * * LIFE IN THE BIG CITY By GEORGE LANAUX Rain! Thunder! Lightning! The rth wind shrieking its path through city's streets! The elements were their worst as the tower clock tolled out the hour—2 a. m. Within .1 dimly lighted room of a massive old red brick building, four >n figures sat hudrLed about a crude oaken table. Their features :ould not be discerned, save for an iccasional glimpse as the llgntning flared through the dripping window- pane. They spoke no word. Aside from the rear of the fire in the old stove, no noise was heard within room save an occasional clicking upon the table top. What were these doing? Did they plot the destiny of others? No! They were playing dominoes! u spite of the hazards of the storm, spite of everything, the city was safe. Jack, Joe, Jim, and Jack were on the job. The city's protectors were at their post. Firemen! Their's was a fierce task—the eternal saving of ladies' children, the eternal pumping of hooded cellars, the eternal playing if dominoes—a man'3 task—but they did it, and did it well. Jack, Joe, Jim and Jake were on the job! 2:15 a. m., and conditions were no better, but just one minute later and, though the storm raged on as before, everything was changed. The crashing of a gong and the four became stantly alive. No longer inert, they jumped about as so many bundles of nerves—arcs flared—another gong— the roar of a monster motor—a huge door pushed open against the gale— the blood-curdling shriek of a siren— Jack, Joe, Jim and Jake were on the job! Rain! Thunder! Lightning! And through it all the engine crashed its way, reeling from side to side, skid ding around paved corners, churning through muddy lanes. Jack, driving the monster muttered under his breath as the rain blinded his vision. Joe cranked the siren and, muttered under his breath. Jim and Joe muttered under their breaths as they clung desperately upon the rear step. A right-hand swerve that riled everything pell inell into one corner of the truek, and they bolted up to the "sprung" alarm box. A forlorn figure, his wet clothing clinging tight to his body, stood solitary and alone upon the corner. He shouted—his voice was scarcely audible above the shrieking wind: "Oh, I shay, osshiffer, i mean firemen, I losht my key; woudja help me hi my winder?" And Jack, Joe, Jim and Jake were on the job! Moral: If you didn't like it, what the h—1 did you read it for. Also— show some school spirit. College Life— (Continued from Page 1) itself to advantage when, later in ife he is able to throw off his mental burdens and lighten his entire life through nothing more than his education, and his background. I know a rather wealthy gentleman whose family ]jfe j3 a wonderful example il this. He came from nothing, and consequently, since his entire life has been spent in accumulating financial resources, he is uneducated. But he married an educated woman, and he saw to it that his only son graduated from college. Now he is retired and the pity of it Is that he cannot in any way appreciate his position while his wife and son enjoy the environment that their wealth can sustain. His work ended—his life ended. Take an interest in some of our ac- 'ivities. Join the basket ball team; contribute to the Cougar; join a club —sleep Junior Col'ege, think Junior College, talk Junior College. We canrt let Junior College become just a night school—and that's what It's going to do unless you students take some Interest In the school and get some AROUND THE SCHOOL Mr. Ledlow—"It seems to me, dear, that there Is something wrong with this cake." Mrs. Ledlow—"That shows you know nothing about it, darling. The Cookbook says it's perfectly delicious!" fJorman—"My wife's gone to the West Indies." Birney—"Jamaica?" Gorman—"No— she wanted to go. Mr. Duggan—"Dear, will you please turn off the radio?" Mrs. Duggan—"But it isn't on, dear. Now, as I was saying ." Collegians, attention! Here is a corner for the settling of your woes and troubles, heartaches, jealousies, and what-not. Just give your letters, which may be aither asking for advice or giving advice to those in need from your own experience, to Louise Forrest, my solicitor. Do not be surprised if she should attempt to pry such letters from yt>u, for she means to keep supplied with the latest troubles affairs whether you will or not! I, Sally Ann, promise to answer you iously, in the best of intentions, in my very most up-to-date advice. Dear Sally Ann: am in a terrible state of mind. I desperately hi love with four wonderful girls. Two are brunettes and another is a little blonde, just five feet tall, and IS sne cute! I SAY he is. Last, but not least, is the sweetest little red-head in the world. Do you wonder that I am worried? Please help me decide which one I prefer. Yours for advice. DALLAS HOLFORD. Dear Dallas: Why SHOULD you prefer one of these dear and varl-eolored-headed girls above the others, which would be very hard to do, especially in the case of the twins? Really, I do not understand, lor, by your letter, you do not siem to he the stable sort o" person who is satisfied to be a "steady" for some time yet. You have such a charming quadruplet from which to choose your type, but do not choose it now. SALLY ANN. Dear Sally Ann: Friday a young senior at the Dental college, of whom I am very fond and with whom I was to have a date that night, called when I was out and left his number. Later I called and his roommate told me that the young doctor had just stepped out, but he, himself, would deliver the message. After many apologies, he said that the doctor wanted to break his date with me because his girl from Fort Worth had arrived and that of course she was expecting a date with him; that thedoctor was very sorry and would still like to have a date with me, wanted me to come to dance anyway, wanted to see me real soon; he continued to apologize. Now-, my dear Sally Ann, I suspect that I've been lied to nad given up in preference to another Houston girl instead of an out-of-town girl. I van; to Know wLiil position I should take against this young Joctor. "A jouug school teacher." IDA MEHR. My Dear Ida: You should not be too harsh to your young doctor. Poor man, between two fires! Such an innocent>souiiding, mopping-his-brow, young man, who was evidently so upset that he could not come to the phone, who had even made his friend upset, surely does not deserve to have a position taken gainst him. But although you should not, I advise that you do! Be, by no other than very cool to him until he has worked hard enough to get back your favor. SALLY ANN. Dear Sally Ann: I'm terribly upset. What would you do if you were in love with a handsome young man (I'm !ure it's love this time), and, just when everything was going good, a Junior College blonde who is really dangerous, appeared on the scene and your boy friend is a gentleman? That's my story. I hope you understand just what it means to me. OPAL BE\N. My Dear Opal: I'm dreadfully sorry your boy frie.'id is e gentleman for they are scarce around these parts, and if the blonde is good enough to get him away even when you had things "going good," I am afraid he Is gone forever. However, if i were you, I would sttirty her technique, see what It is that most appeals to him, add that to my own technique, and strengthen any good points of my own that she happens to lack, then begin again! SALLY ANN. Dear Sally Ann: Is it foolish for a girl to prepare herself for a medical career, spending -CLUBS TENNIS CLUB The Tennis Club held its first meeting Dec. 6 under the sponsorship of Mrs. Bender and Miss Mackey. The club desires to organize this fall so that next spring when tennis season comes all members of the club will be ready to play. Membership is open to everyone ho plays tennis or wishes to learn i play. Instructions in the game will be given to members who do not know how to play by those in the club who are already playing. All students interested in tennis be sure to watch the bulletin board for further information. HONOR SOCIETY The Houston Junior College Honor Society, which is sponsored by Mrs. Soule, asks that all giivs interested in this association get in touch with ihe ponsor as soon as possible so that a delinite program can be arranged for the coming term. All girls are eligible except those taking less than two courses at the college. FENCING CLUB The boys of Houston Junior College are invited to join the Fencing Cub which held its first regular meeting Nov. 2 and are asked to give their names to Mrs. Bender, as soon as possible. Two members of the club gave an exhibition in the art of skilfully using a foil at assembly on Nov. 20. The bulletin board will carry notices of each meeting that the club holds. Frosh Soph Melee— (Continued from Page 1) tily attired in what prisons term "the death house garb." Say Joe, you weren't outfitted by some enterprising undertaker, were you? Aha, now we know the younger Christensou'3 ancestral name—Kelly Duluth. T east that's what his red E amiels showed. Fred Mil's brought along his nut- tens. Someone told him the field would be muOfiy" Aw Fweddy, did you get you- nrec-ous hands soiled? "det that Airdale out," pleaded irate bop'-.s, as "Lulu" Hofheinz pranced nbout the track. Gee, Hey ^ a great game oE football. Se:-. you. 3w's the foot J. W.? Newton would take home a bum liniD for a souvenir, Ikey" Tracy showed up so well in the Sophomore slaughter that his services were enlisted for the Blinn Irene Cafcalas and Celia Lesky did their duty by the teams and furnished ses. of water for the "dreat big football men" during time outs. 'Stop Tamborello," was the Freshman cry. Tarn's 4 hundred pounds a big factor lu the upper classmen victory. For those that are interested, the score was T to 2. Several thousand members of the fairer sex of Junior College braved red noses, and cold footsies to boost their class prides. Many a shrill "Hello' floated over the field as some girl discovered her latest crush in the thick of the battle. No wonder Joe Jacobs couldn't remember how many Hey Heys were to be used in the signal. Virginia Rainbolt lost a few pounds toting the stick around as a lineman. Now she'll let Rosalind's clothes alone. No one knew what everything was about, but just the same the SOPHO- MORE-freshmen battle was a g-eat affair. her father's money and her time, when she plans to marry someone capable of taking care of her for life? RUTH KIDD My Dear Ruth: Everything depends on the girl's own attitude as to whether she wishes to be "taken care of for life," or to follow her own career and be "happy though married." If she does not intend to use her medical training seriously, it would be foolish for her to take it up seriously; but if she likes the study so much that she is wiling to spend the years of work necessary, she should think a long time before giving it up, for a waBte of talent is one of the saddest things in the world.
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