Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931
File 004
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 004. October 21, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 16, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/190.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 21, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/190

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 004, October 21, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 16, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/190.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 1, October 21, 1931
Contributor
  • Conroe, Oscar
Date October 21, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript FOUR THE COUGAR FORMER HJC STUDENT GIVEN POSITION AT TEXAS UNIVERSITY Royal E. Neuman, former student at Junior college, received an appointment as student assistant in the department of physics at Texas university. Neuman attended school here and was student assistant during the semester of 1930-31, under Mr. Schuh- mann, professor of physics. "This is highly complimentary to Junior college to have one of its students go directly from the school as a graduate, having had two years of physics, and be chosen from students all over the state as student assistant at the University of Texas", states Mr. Dupree, when asked by reporter for statement. Neuman wrote to Mr. Schuhmann thanking him for his help in receiving this position, and for his kind encouragement. In his letter he states thar he is now continuing his major in physics, and is taking a course in the "Elementary Electron Theory" under Dr. Kuene, and intends to take "Audio and Radio Frequency Currents" under Dr. Brown next semester. COUGAR COLLEGIANS PLAN H. J. C. DIRECTORY In a meeting of the Cougar Collegians, girls, pep club, Friday, October 7, Marjorie Ashe was chosen vice president; Lula Grace Kellogg, secretary; Lucille Cafcalas, treasurer and Lucy Talley, reporter. Rena Mai Butler is president of the organization. Plans are under way for the publica- lion of the "Cougar Directory," a booklet issued annually by the pep club, giving the names, addresses and telephone number of each member of the student body. NEW STUDES— (Continued from-.F ;1) orado, Oklahoma A. and M., James Millekan university, Southwestern Louisiana institute. Billingham State normal, Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, University of Iowa, and University of Alabama. Students from Gulf Park academy, Western Military academy, and Marot Junior college are now attending H. J- C. From high schools not in this state come 14 members of the student body of this school. These institutions are Balboa high school, Balboa, Canal Zone; Milam and Hallton high schools of Missouri; Savannah and Benedistine high schools of Savannah, Georgia; Central high of Tulsa, Okla.; Huntington, Indiana, high; Ragley and Lees- ville high schools of Louisiana; Sophie B. Wright Girls' school of New Orleans; Canadian, Pekin, and Frankston, high schools; and the Abbey school. Student transfers from colleges in Texas number 64. The University of Texas ranks first in this respect, having 19 ex-students in the H. J. C. Other universities represented are Rice institute, Sam Houston normal, Texas A. and M., Baylor C. I. A., Southwestern, Texas Tech, Kidd-Key, Southwest Texas Teachers' college, St. Edwards, Sul Ross Teachers' college, Westmoreland college, and North Texas State Teachers' college. The various junior colleges of Texas represented in this school are Allen academy, Peacock Military academy, Texas Military academy, San Marcos academy, South Park Junior college, San Angelo Junior college, and Wcs- leyan Junior college. Houston is well represented in the group of new members. Of the five senior high schools in the city, Sam Houston leads with 54 students. Following are San Jacinto with 53, Reagan 28, Davis 10, and Milby four. Other local institutions represented are St. Agnes academy, five; St. Thomas, college, four; business colleges, three, and Houston Law school, one. High schools from every section of the state have contributed new members to the student body of the Junior college. If you are one who dwells on statistics you will notice that for the fall term of 1931 the Houston Junior college has surpassed all of its previous records for enrollment o.f students from distanl points in the United States. WHATAMAN! Junior college has' its own "What aman" in Joseph Taylor. Taylor is { freshman coming to college from all over the world with a reputation as a wonder man. At the age of 14 "Cowboy", as Taylor is called by his friends, ran away to sea, and knocked about the globe until the latter part of the year 1926, at which time he returned to the U. S. and attended Sam Houston high, in order to acquire credits necessary for college entrance. At school "Cowboy" was on the football squad, trackteam, Athenian debating team, trumpet player in Houston Public School band, and leading player in the class play, "Bachelors Forever." Taylor went to South America instead of college and roamed from one end of that continent to the other until 1928 when he left Buenos Aires for South Africa. During his stay in South Africa, "Cowboy" Taylor took up car racing and drove a Fiat Six for the Shell Petroleum company in Durban. returning to the states in 1929, he drove a Johnson "321' outboard and an OX.5 motor boat in 510 class in many races at Seguin, Houston, Waco, Free- port, San Antonio, Galveston, and Lake Charles. His boat, "Miss Lillian II," won many races in the free-for-all division. . He helped introduce outboard polo in this section of the country and received the nickname of "Cowboy Taylor, Prince of Wales of Outboard Motordom," on account of numerous spills. Taylor went back to autos in 1930 and his Chrysle "75" was a winner in various races at Houston, Waco, and other cities. He took part in the 150- mile road race, Laifedo to Monterrey, Mexico, and experienced a bad crash- up, but on the next day took second money in a race on the Monterrey dirt track. Taylor was ret-uned by Ihe Esason Motor Comjany ot the start of r.">'.'!. i;icing Austins or. the one and- ou.'-half and the cne-half mile track in Hr-uston. He drove nine consecutive races, takin? fo i first, three seconds; and two thirds Taylor drove his faMous Chrysler umil June 15 when he was severely injured in the worst crash-up of his career. Taylor was in the hospital two uio.itns and is still ui'ering from e.le ':< of u»e accident. 'Cowboy" is a w.'r.-i c." tho Gulf Coast Motor Boat association. Mississippi Power Boat association, National Outboard association, and is an official A.A.A. racing driver. At Lake Charles, "Cowboy" has the record of 48.2 m.p.h. for 25 miles and the Monterrey track record of 114 m.p.h. for 30 miles. Dizzy Dean and Pepper Martin should look to their laurels for here is a real "WHATAMAN"! The Cougar Whispers H. J. C. SECRETARY IS SERIOUSLY ILL Mrs. Rowen Hamlin, nee Miss Evelyn Wolfe, is seriously ill at the Scott White clmic at Temple, Texas. Mrs. Hamlin w^s office secretary of the Houston Junior College at the time she became ill, and will resume her duties here when she has sufficiently recovered. The wedding of Miss Evelyn Wolfe to Mr. Rowen Hamilin, which occurred June 10, 1931, at the Heights Baptist church, was a surprise to her numer- friends. FACULTY MEMBERS BOAST NEW JUNIORS New arrivals this past summer in the homes of several members of the faculty have caused some boastful comments to be heard around the campus. James H. Ledlow, auditor and registrar, proudly broadcasts the fact that he is the father of a baby girl, Faye June, born June 19—"The prettiest baby you ever saw," he boasts—"Just like her father". How r»bout that, Mrs. Ledlow? It seems Warren A. Roes, instructor in mathematics, is "trying to figure out why Mr. Ledlow should fee! he is so important, for he, too, has a new daughter, Nancy Jo, whose birthday was July 3. Then there's Mrs. Duggan, former registrar of the college, who doesn't mind telling you that her son, Lee Jr., born August 14, is something to be proud of. Here's luck and happiness to the new juniors and their proud parents. Golly, oh, golly! School's started again and we're all here to try to get some education in our heads. I just saw Myrta Ann Meisner, looking real sweet, as usual, and carrying an armful of books. Who was that I just heard laughing? Oh, of course! it's Gladys Jacobs. There she is way down the hall. Hi, Happy! Wilma and Silas are having quite an interesting conversation over there in the corner. Doesn't Wilma look cute? Cy Shaw has some new glasses. Cy means to look into that sophomore class! He may use them to study with too, but, oh, I don't know. Say,->didn't B. W. Payne, Jr., look cute on that donkey (?) on freshman day? Mack Douglas seemed to be in quite a muddle over his dates the other day; how'd it come out, Mack? There's Ruth Depperman and Anna Sloan. They're plenty cute, eh? Talking about keen girls—there's one, by name, Grace Schoelman. Boys—there goes that good-looking blonde,—Melbadel Wright. Who's your shadow now, Melba? Lucy Talley's in Mr. Birney's journalism class and she's a good writer, what I mean! Harry Phillip's there, too; I don't know whether there's any hopes for him or not. Well—it seems that all good things must end too soon so I'll stop. Editor's Note: Oh, yeah? CRACKS— Wise and Otherwise By Harvey B. Richards, Jr. These so-called fresh-men seem to have be^n off cold storage for quite a while. They are becoming spoiled. Wake up, sophs! Cy Shaw certainly has a gift for gab. gab. It will be fine now if he has a gift for Lab. Smoking in the halls is now prohibited. That rule will be a thing of the past ifi many more of these "sweet young things" attend this school. Some well known author wanted to know, "What is this thing called love?" Perhaps he or she has never visited Houston Junior college. It is one thing to be chivalrous, another to be gentlemanly. Which of these, if either, is the average Junior college student, especially in assembly? Mr. Dupre says that he has an eye on smokers in the building, crap- shooters in the front door, sots on the campus Oh, Sister Ann, what can this monster be with so many eyes? The new freshman president has a 'lot of good ideas, BUT be careful, M.- President, you don't seem to have come off cold storage with the rest. We see "Pot" Lowe is back on the campus. Look out, girls, he may get a crush on you, in more ways than one "Everything that goes up is destined to come down."—So the freshmen found out when they rushed the front entrance last Wednesday night. But after all is said and done, let's keep in step, freshmen. Let's stick together, and when we say "stick", we don't mean "clinch". Grins and Groans Louis: I can read your thoughts, Gladys. Gladys: Then what makes you sit so far away? Judge; How did you come to steal the automobile from the cemetery? Prisoner: Well, your honor, the car looked so lonely at the gate that I thought the owner must be dead. VILLA de SANTIAGO— (Continued from Page 1) rately, tells us the story of the first settlers. The early autumn sky was a grayish hue as the sun sank behind the peaks of the Sierra Madre Range. The strands of sunlight, giving a pink, yellow and gold cast to the higher mountains, mingled with the darker blue of the lower swells that rose to obliteration in the haze of clouds, from whose golden linings the sun drifted down in strands of gold and silver, gave a beautiful aspect to this twilight High upon the rocky ledge of a cliff, a lone figure stood, face to this celestial spectacle that only the semi-tropical sky and the rugged peaks of arid mountains can afford. His nostrils seemed flared so that he might inhale the magnificance of the place into his very being, into the very depths of his soul. Tethered close by, his horse stood nibbling at the small patches of grass that were struggling for existence among the rocks and cactus. Finally, he turned away with an effort, as if some great force was pulling him back. After tightening the girth of the saddle, he mounted easily and rode slowly down the mountain path. At a sharp turn in the path he pulled the horse to a momentary halt and turned for a last inhalation of the scene before the rocky cliff blocked it from view. Then rounding the turn slowly, picking its way carefully among the rocks and boulders, the horse bore him down toward the valley that had now grown dim in the coming dusk. Of a sudden he came to a stop. Only the easy and slow breathing of the horse was audible, but it was not at this that he listened. A faint sound came from the direction of the boulders on his right. It was not a sound made by some denizen of the wild,'to which his trained ears were so accustomed, nor the low mourning of the wind as it smoothly found its way among the clifs, but a sound that was foreign to this country of wild things and romantized scenes. ! Dismounting, he quietly and carefully slipped from one huge boulder to another, gradually making his way toward the source of the sound. At last he stopped. The sound was plain now. True, it was foreign to these mountains, out of place in this lonely vastness, but it was familiar. He had heard it once before when he had found a lost child and returned it to its mother. What he heard was the heart throbbing sobs of a human being. Without hesitation he strode forward. Seated on a flat stone sat a slender figure, face in hands, utterly unconscious of the presence of another being. At the slight noise of a disturbed pebble, she turned. She sat there speechless, great blue eyes floating in what were now joyous tears, dark brown hair falling in a disheaveled manner about her shoulders, her well-shaped lips emitting a sigh of relief. With a quick stride, he was by her side. "You are hurt?" She slowly shook her head, unable to trust her voice. •Please, what is it?" She cast a glance into the growing darkness and shrank closer to him. When again her eyes were turned to him they were filled with something akin to terror. "Oh, your are frightened," and he smiled, a smile that seemed to warm the nip of chilliness that was in the air. His darker skin was a contrast to her fair complexion and his presence made her feel that her fears of before were fantastic and foolish. "Come, you mustn't be afraid. There is nothing in all these mountains lhat could be induced to hurt you. Tell me, why are you so afraid of my mountains?" She lowered her eyes and spoke for the first time. "f am lost," her voice, though choked with previous sobs sounded silvery in the oncoming darkness. "And now you are found, safe and as lovely as the flowers that grow in that valley. I will fix you some food and you must rest." She laughed with bubbling delight as a child who has found something new and interesting. He rose and walked toward his horse. To her, as he disappeared around a boulder, the place became Cv SHAW WILL LEAD STUDENT ASSOCIATION Cy Shaw, sophomore, was elected by both sophomore and freshman classes to serve as president of the Students' association this year. The Students' association is the governing body of the college and is composed of the entire student body. It functions through its officers and committees, together with the faculty, for student welfare. Offices of vice president, secretary and treasurer will be filled at an early date. Candidates from both sophomore and freshman classes are eligible for these offices. Prof. Harvey W. Harris was chosen as student advisor. A constitution is to be drawn up in regular form, according to President Shaw. cold and foreboding again, and it was a pleasant relief to see his shadowy figure return leading the stoically built animal. After unsadding his horse he set about building a fire and soon the orange and golden flames were lapping around a skillet in which were layers of sizzling bacon. She sat a few feet away, her back against a rock, eyes glistening, shadows from the warm fire playing about her shapely figure. When the meal was cooked they sat and ate hungrily of the simple fare that was before them. Each was alone with his thoughts, there being little talk while they ate. After they had eaten, he unpacked a roll from behind the saddle and spread a blanket beside the fire. "You shall sleep here tonight. It is too hard a trip for you *o make it back to Monterrey tonight. Tomorrow I will take you there." She looked up at him quickly and was relieved at seeing the same warm smile on his lips. "How did you know I was from Monterrey?" she asked in some surprise. "I saw you arrive yesterday.^ You are Miss Chanderler, are you not?" "Yes, but I don't remember having met you." "You haven't, I am Jose de Leon.i' He looked away and finally, "I looked for your name in the register at the hotel. He seemed somewhat abashed at his confession and turned to rekindle the fire. "You had better get some sleep; I will call you early in the morning," he told her over his shoulder. With a parting "good-night," she laid down on the blanket, her arm for a pillow, and was soon lost in a heavy sleep. Jose rose from the fireside and sauntered over to a large rock where he seated himself to smoke and soon feel alseep. The Sierra Madre sunrise found the two slowly making they way through the lonely mountain passes that adorned the long stretch into Monterrey. Jose sat behind the saddle, Rose Chanderler rode in the saddle, the big horse easily picking ifs way among the rocks. As she sat there in the big Mexican saddle, she could feel the presence of Jose behind her. His presence brought a strange feeling creeping into her being. She could not fathom it. For some reason she was happier at that moment than she had ever been in all her life. Was she in love? She knew she was. At that moment the same feeling crept over Jose, and as she turned at his slight touch, their eyes met. In each others* eyes love was written and understood. Late that - evening, as they were entering Monterrey, he was talking to her, speaking low that the passing people might not hear. "——and I shall build our home on the slopes of the valley below where I found you, my Rosita, and our children will settle there. Ah, our village. What will we call it? A villa, yes, ■but a villa of what? I have it—Santiago Villa de Santiago." "What a beautiful name," she breathed. And so was the mythical version of the beginning of the picturesque little village of Villa de Santiago, a place of peace, love and happiness. As we pass out of town we stop and look back, loathe to leave, wishing that our existence could be as care-free and as beautiful as that of the people who live in those adobe houses with the thatched roofs.
File Name uhlib_10270243_v005_n001_004.jpg