Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931
File 002
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 002. October 21, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/188.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 21, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/188

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 002, October 21, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/188.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 1, October 21, 1931
Contributor
  • Conroe, Oscar
Date October 21, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE CO U G A It THE COUCAR Of The Houston Junior College Houston, Texas Published semimonthly during the college year. Subscriptio Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Editor-in-Chief Assistant Editor . News Editors Faculty Advisor .... Established 1928 ., $1.00 per year. ..Oscar Con roe Betty Covington, Adolph Marks F. R. Birney Department Editors .. V. F. Harrison Lucille Cafcalas Gladys Jacobs Verna German Sports Feature .... . Humor Literary .. Reporters Ruth Depperman, Harry Phillips, Myrta Ann Mersner, Mary Jane Fly, Patsy Inman, Wilma Lindsey, L. P. Marshall, Margaret Macey, Eugene Heard, Winona Phelps, Helen Higgins, James Julian. HOW 'BOUT IT? Listen, fellow students, pals, friends, etc., I don't wancha ta think I'm tryin' ta go soft or anythin' like that, but the way we acted in assembly Wednesday night is a cryin' shame. Ya know that act we pulled with the alarm clock, the ringin' just when Dupre got up to make his speech an' all? Well after that thing started ringin', I kinda felt sorry for Ole "Dupe." Now layin' all jokes aside, that was his big moment havin' to get up before all the big bugs an' all. An' say, didja notice how he let it slide, just laughed it off. He ain't such a bad scout after all. He didn't try to stop the whole cahoots ta find out who it was thet wuz ringin' the thing. The whole bunch of 'em laughed. Notice 'em. Ya know I thought it would be cute, about the clock an' all, but didn't so many of the kids laugh, and that's what we was doin' it for. Oh, they kinda smiled sorta, but we didn't get the laughs I expected us to. In fact, I believe the big bugs laughed more'n the rest of 'em. I've kinda come to the conclusion that stuff like we pulled don't go over so big in a college. Why, if we'd a pulled that in Junior High, boy, they'd a never quit Laughin' an' we'd a been heroes for a month. Ya know when I first started out here, I thought mebbe we'd stand in good with the upper "classies" if we'd kinda cut up a little and show 'em we had some fun in us, but I haven't found 'em payin' so much 'tention to us, do ya think? Looks like they would, but they just kinda give us one of those descending looks an' go on. Wonder who that wuz that started that bell down stairs, right in the middle of "Obie's" speech? Gosh, how I'd a hated to been in his shoes. He didn't act like he even knew it wuz ringin', just kept right on talkin', and I bet there wuzn't a soul there that heard a word he said. Boy, I don't know whether I'm a piker or not, or whether I'm just turnin' yellow, anyway, we can't keep this up. I'm kinda 'fraid they'll oust us. No kid- din', if our stunt had gone over a little bit funnier, I'd a been thinkin' up sompin bigger 'n better, but listen, fellows, I believe they'll think we're smarter, and the girls '11 like us better, if we see how little disturbance we can make. An' boy, is there some pippin' babies out here! How 'bout it? THE NUTSHELL wants is to want something.—Robert Nathan. Learn as if to live forever; Live as if to die tomorrow. —Ansalus de insulis. Experience brings with it pain as well as pleasure.—Brice O. Taylor. Eveiy cloud has its silver lining, hut it is sometimes a little difficult to go! it to the mint.— —Don Marquis. Hearts are like loaves of bread, —you must break them to get anything out of them at all. Flirtation is attention without i n tention.—Burde tte. Prohibition makes you want to cry into your beer and deny you the beer to cry into.—Don Marquis. Heres' to you, my dear, be gay, This is no time for sorrow. For I love you, my dean, today, Who'eer I may love tomorrow. OUR WANDERING COLYUMIST INTRAMURAL SPORTS Prof. Archie French, physical training instructor, is planning an extensive intramural system of athletics at Junior College_ this year. This should prove very popular with the students, because while receiving gymnastic training, the collegians will at the same time be afforded the opportunity of participating in competitive sports. But there is food for thought. In addition to the intramural idea, why not sponsor interclass competition, fostering rivalry on the athletic field between the freshmen and sophomore classes. This scheme has been in existence in many of the leading colleges over the country for some time, and the freshmen- sophomore or junior-senior grid and cage battles always prove to be interesting events, which draw the undivided support of the student bodies. School officials have put the ban on football at Junior college this year and the thought of a possible grid battle between the classes is out of the question, but if the executives would sanction such a plan in the other sports, such as basketball, baseball and track, the frays between the first year men and the upperclassmen should prove to be spectacles. Then too, these contests, if given the right sort of backing by the school enmasse, may become annual affairs and mark the beginning of a tradition that undoubtedly would continue perpetually. It is to be hoped that this plan proves favorable with Mr. French, and other members of the faculty, as well as Mr. Oberholtzer and that they will do all in their power to support it to the fullest extent. THE NEED FOR COLLEGE "Rice Institute is a fine institution and has done a magnificent work," says Miss Genevieve Johnson, dean of San Jacinto high school, who was recently honored for serving forty years with the Houston public schools. However, in a plea for a University of Houston, Miss Johnson goes on to say: "But its (Rice's) advantages are limited to those of outstanding scholarship, because of limited finances. My experience has shown me that the great proportion of my students who have 'made good' in Houston and elsewhere and become valuable citizens were not those who made the highest grades in school. Suppose they had been barred from educational advantages simply because they did not reach a certain high standard of scholarship? They had ability, and in those days we did not know how to give them full opportunity to develop, but many developed in spite of that. "Every boy and girl, regardless of whether they make the highest school grades or not, should be given the opportunity to develop the ability that is theirs, and learn to do well the things that are within their reach and interests. Only a city university, with tuition free, will give this opportunity to the boys and girls of Houston who most need it. "My heart aches as day after day a boy or girl sits at my desk at San Jacinto, ready to leave high school, and with head bowed says, 'Miss Genevieve, I wish I could go on to school. I want to, but we haven't the money.' "Houston can afford to build such a university; in fact, she can not afford not to. I do not know who will start the movement, but I believe it will come. It should be endowed by public subscription, every citizen having a part according to his means. We have men who could put thousands of dollars into such an institution, and what a monument that would be! Every year we delay means that hundreds of boys and girls will be forced to go out into life deprived of that training which should have been so much fuller and easier.—Rice Thresher. SOME "POMES" BLUE MONDAY Blue Monday, they say is the time of week When things stack up the most, When the boss is anything but meek, And your mood is of nothing to boast. But why do they pick on Monday, An ordinarily homely day? When peace usually reigns on Sunday, Unless the mother-in-law has come to stay. My blue day is every day That lessons have stacked up, Through procrastination in every way, And laziness having filled my cup. But, Hell! What is a blue day? I don't know, do you? I'm just atalkin' when I say These crazy things I do. We're all just alike. So fickle, so darn incomplete, Know nothing about this fife Let's get agoin' an stop this thinkin' Of life and all its sorrow. Let's start risin' and just athinkin' Of the good times we'll have tomorrow. —Harvey B. Richards, Jr. THE RAID OF THE MOSQUITOES They cam e— biting, buzzing, flying, clinging— Whizzing, whirring, deadly stinging; Demons of the dankest regions, Foulest fiends in infinite legions. They stung—right and left and up and Here, there and yonder; and all around. They sought the nooks and rooms of all, They infested the once peaceful hall. They cling—to high and low, to soph and fresh— The slaps, the claps that they did cause The profs to them are just more flesh. They took in faith as kind applause! They laughed—in highest insect glee, When students tried to fly or flee. The vultures dodged and sneered at Flit; They played one big game, and we were "it." They stay—and, helpless, we can but pray That from ihe North kind Heav'n will spray Ice, snow, and sleet; and freezing rain— It's the torture we mind—not the pain. —Lillian Schwartz. ITS WONDERFUL We have been down the rows of freshman bliss, Through the shadow of a professor's And now, to just think that we can kiss Goodbye to this d— Freshman math, It's wonderful j We have come out the front door On the toes of tiophomore boots; Before Christipas. Appetizer: don't read this! Unsensered. Dear Aluminum Editor; With the aid of. Rand & McNally, the Zodiac, and other hibernatorial hints (not including the sheriff), I migrated successfully from Texas' Largest City to the port of Miss-ing men. During the puny perigrination, it may please you to know, I conjured up all manner of pleasing possibilities: how I'd star in everything from runt golf to writing tooth paste ads; how I'd inveigle the mamas and waylay the daughters; in short, how I'd take this great big, beautiful, blissful, buxom ball labeled the Earth and make it feel like the feminine side of an apache dance. Thus and so, as it were, I tamed the contents of these hooked hemispheres into the essence of a muzzled oyster just as easily as a supple young gir! of eighteen lifts her other face from a compact. Yes, sir, ' old Earthus Mundamus felt about as valuable as restaurant butter when I > got through churning her. All I lacked !wps a Bos 31; and that's the unvarnished truth! Say, Aluminum, did you ever hear the pop of a toy pistol? Well, that was me. My career was stopped like an inflated wave on a craggy rock. I hit here feeling like Fifth Avenue in Arkansas and before I could get up I felt like a pair of stray eyeballs in a sandstorm. I was stunned, suppressed, simply sandbagged. I have been striving, these three weeks, to weave a coup d'etat, but its harder than trying to make beer out of the hops of a frog. Thus you can see why I feel like the "wrung bosom of a dying man," a fractured mountain, and the ape of the flock. Yes indeedy, life has been one long series of common blunders. RAH! RAH! BAH! BAH! HA! HA! The University, where the girls reform; it's in class to be out of class to be in class; where's there's life assurance; where Holly-wood, a peach can, and cow's cud. Well, I tried to join a sorority yesterday, but they insisted that I wasn't in good shape, all this after I'd rented a perfectly good fire-extinguisher. Egad, eftsoons my anger eked great; I. retorted I was the money, and they'd better put me in circulation. They clipped the conversation by saying I was archaic and had better get changed. To town this last week to hold a conference (very private: Margie, I was really looking for a job). The confer- ence^nding sooner than planned (confound him) I turned toes toward the town's torth tent. (How's that for illit- creation, eh Birney?) You know it's marvelous here how the inhabitants offer their services. In one block only, between Eighth and Ninth streets, I refused thirty-five shines; and was fortunate in escaping so lightly, I thought. While I was thus deeply thinking, and consequently off my guard, the pat and leather laborers of the next block incorporated into a most persistent and perplexing huddle; intending, so it seems, to re-establish the glory of profession which I had so desecrated the block before. It's an art in which they shine, too. Upon discovering their Chicago-like tendencies, I started an end run, tripped over a bale of cotton, and gave up a dime. Getting your shoes shined is like reading a comic: it gives you a certain amount of reflection but doesn't help your soul—which is what I need right 1 now. Up the Principal Stem with a great | flurry of feet, raising thern high, in goosestep-fashion, so that the cuffs of my pants went clear of the top of my shoes with each stride; clicking and scraping again my heels as they struck the pavement. Such are my methods. At length I arrived at the end of the Main Artery, which gushes madly And now, we do that chore To some of these fresh galoots— It's wonderful. • We have for years, held the sack With fingers and hands so sore, All, just "to get it back", Ami just t» be a sophomore— It's wonderful, —Harvey B. Richards, . through the city, over the river, past the business district, until it reached So&So Street where it hurls itself against the State Capitol, and with a last, frantic gurgle splits wide open, part flowing east and part west. Thus it is as if the old granite hut were not satisfied with splitting political parties. It was now about nine o'clock; the morning vapors had not cleared; onlyr a dull, diffused maze of light, hanging in the eastern sky, marked the position of the sun; the trees dripped heavily of moisture; everything had that sol-* emn, somber appearance of desolation. I always like it at this time; such a variety of interesting and mysterious things is happening there. To cull them from among the common places is both delightful and educational. I had crossed but a part of the * grounds, being yet beneath the deep shadows of the west wing, when I saw a blonde. Because of the fog, its necessary obscurity, I could hardly ^classify her, but figuratively speaking, she was a soft, shy, sentimental innocent' abroad. I had advanced only a few yards, however, when I SAW THE FOLLY- OF MY HASTY CONVICTION. It was only a clever politician extracting the dollars from a blind beggar's cup with one hand and putting a pair of lenseless goggles on him with the other: all this at the same time and very fast, too. By the way I notice . where there were three femmes vying 'for honors in the sophomore electoral race helt at your college a short while back. Oh well Knowing that you are hankering for a little purloined news concerning college progeny, I will give you a little idea of the kind of social fabrick they're weaving. STRUGGLING SCIENCE SUCCUMBS SATURDAY TO SUPER-INTELLECT Alice McCullough, published by the Houston Junior College, caused ripples* and wrinkles in scientific circles here Saturday. By her marvelous power of divination and a remarkable stretch of her imagination, she guessed within two minutes of the actual time required by a 100-pound biock of ice to melt in* a display window. A classy computation! She knows what it takes to melt them. The engineers, and other T-square addicts, who compute in terms of Einstein and cosine, looked about us cheerful as a Dallas fog in Dallas when the result was announced. They were • possessed with the polite saucity of trolley-conductor combined with the delicious smile of a convict guard. Augean Anecdotes: * Bob Flemin: Out sleuthing for a liberty belle. J. W. Newton: Absolutely refuses to look at the headlines. Grace McDonald: Like Rockefeller, she believes in the Golden Rule. Howard Brance: "Love's Labours Cost". Aaron Kalmans: In search of a co-ed liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Terry Russ: Thinks in terms ofw Houston and talks in terms of Maurine. Oliver McCall: Spending bis spare time in trying to overthrow Amtiican independence among the girls. — Bill Henderson: Still trying to find out what inning Pope's "Homer" m came in. Homer Helton; "What we need is longer nights." Joe, Joe, and Tarn—the pop-lar three: The mighty Tarn is writing his thesis this year on "Ho2 to Sell Dyed Sparrows for Canaries." Me: Trying to get ahead. Well, I* need one, don't I? There's not a thread of material left so I am forced to stop, spinning con-« versa tion for the nonce and return to the irksome duty of polishing my halo. Please excuse this letter. It's only a feeble effort of mine to be a nutcracker. And the big words—when a writer has nothing to say he inevitably clothes his thoughts with monstrous polysyllables, metaphors, and similies, so, as it seems, to appear intelligent* in the eyes of his reader. Will write you next month, if, by that time, I have not lost my balance and been blown away by the overdraft. With ten thou- » sand synonyms of love, I am, Yo' honey, "Gee" Weldon, ,, Class of 1932 alias 1940. Dessert: You've already had it! Please overlook the tipewriter: I need the praxtice.
File Name uhlib_10270243_v005_n001_002.jpg