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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 001. October 21, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 11, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/187.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 21, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/187

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931 - File 001, October 21, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 11, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/191/show/187.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 1, October 21, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 1, October 21, 1931
Contributor
  • Conroe, Oscar
Date October 21, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript DEDICATED THE COUGAR PUBLISHED BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF THE HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE WELCOME TO HOUSTON, TEXAS. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1931 TOURTH ANNUAL - RECEPTION FOR FRESHMEN HELD Five Hundred Novices Initiated Into Mysteries of Junior * College Society Amid the yells, boos, cheers, jeers, hoots, hurrahs and whoopees of 500 freshman boys and girls, the fourth annual freshman reception of the Houston Junior college was held Friday, October 9, at 9:30 p.m. in the gymna- "sium of San Jacinto high school. "Hail,, Hail, the Gang's All Here," opened Ihe program- The Rice Cavaliers furnished the music while the freshmen sang. The "fish" class assembled on the " second floor of the main building and marched in a column of fours, surrounded by a bodyguard of sopho- w mores, into the gym. The slimes then were seated on one whole side the gym as the affair began. The orchestra played "Home, Sweet Home," and Eugenia Stevenson, "Cisco" Kellogg, Pat Foley, and Lee Stone sang a mournful quartet. Pat sang soprano. .At the conclusion of Berlin's famous ballad, (or was it De Sylva, Brown, and Henderson?) the "fish" filed out of ther places and danced fervently to *.he lulling strains df "Lazy River." Following a brief period of dancing, all freshman boys were ordered to lake off their shoes, tie them together, and throw them into the middle of the floor. After the shoes had been deposited, the slimes were lined up . «£ when given the word, div ed in for their zapatos. It was a merry scramble. After numerous other "slime agi- "tating" stunts of this type, the sophs and "fish" settled down to the task of the evening and danced into the early hours of the morning. Cy Shaw, Jim Bertrand, Christine j Fitzegerald, Bob Branham, and Rena Mae Butler composed the committee, which, with the assistance of Prof. *Harvey W. Harris, completed plans for the reception. Birney Puts One Over "I can't compete with a donkey!" Fred Birney, instructor of journalism at th* Houston Junior college, announced to one of his classes last Wednesday night. The confession was accompanied by blushes on the part of Mr. Birney, and giggles from the class. The innocent cause of this remark was an old grey donkey ridden across the college campus while Birney was discussing the advantages of the next text. The scene aroused so much interest among the students near the window that Birneys lecture was passing unnoticed-. ' A slight mistake was made as to the nature of the animal, but the remark brought back the attention of the class, which was, after all, what he wanted. NEW STUDES COME FROM MANY PARTS Thirteen States and Canal Zone Represented by New Enrollments JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENTS HEAR DR. OBERHOLTZER President of Institution Addresses Record Gathering at Formal Assembly Dr. E. E. Oberholtzer, president of Houston Junior College, spoke to one of the largest assemblies in Ihe history of the school at the formal assembly Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium. "We can't have a college without sludent;\" stated Dr. Oberholtzer. "We can get along without the building, but it is necessary that we have students to have a college. You are part of this college as a student, and the kind of college we have depends on the kind of student you are. There are two kinds of students, and tivo kinds of teachers. One group always does, End the other group always claims they Approximately 325 new students, representing schools in 13 states and the Canal Zone, enrolled in the Houston Junior college for the current school year. Heading the list of states with students in H. J. C.'s is Texas with 295 representatives. Following Texas, in order named, are Louisiana, California, Oklahoma, Missouri, Georgia, Colorado, Mississippi, Alabama, Ohio, New Mexico, Iowa, Indiana, and Canal Zone. Colleges outside of this state represented in the Junior college are University of California, University of Col- (Continued on Page 4) FRESHMAN CLASSlfAS Doctor Oberholtzer stated that he worked his way through college, but before going there, had lived in a small country town. Village boys were always considered as "bullies." "I was always higi;-tempered, and never liked to take a licking. I later found that in order to be a good fighter, I had to get licked occasionally. I was never licked until I thought I was, but I soon learned how to take a licking," related Doctor Oberholtzer. "There isn't a student in Houston Junior college that can't make the grade if he sets out to do it. Nothing would please Mr. Black or me better than to have the records of this college stand out in the kind of work you do as college students. Of course most of the students work in 1he day ti . and some are perhaps wondering if it ELECTION OF OFFICERS will pay? It all depends on why you MILLER PRINCIPAL SPEAKER AT FIRST ASSEMBLY PROGRAM "Chances are 750 to one against (he non-college man to make a success in life," stated Prof. M. A. Miller in a * speech delivered hefore the student body of Houston Junior college last Wednesday flight in the auditorium. This is the first of a series of assembly programs that have been planned, according to S. W. Henderson, as- - slstant dean, pro tern, for benefit, instruction, and pleasure of H. J. C. students- Mr. Henderson presided over assem- . bly in place of N. K. Dupre, and introduced Professor Miller as the principal speaker of the evening. « In closing his address, Professor Miller said that in order to make a favorable impression on the outsider and also help the student, always keep "striving for a good, cl?an, wholesome school atmosphere. Members of the freshman class of Houston Junior college elected officers at a mass meeting held in the school assembly hall Monday, October 5, at 7:30 p.m. ' Mack douglas, former San Jacinto student, was elected president. Other officers chosen were B. W. Payne, Jr., vice president; Eugenia Stevenson, secretary; and Donald Aiken, treasurer. Payne was formerly a member of the Sam Houston high school student body, while Miss Stevenson comes from Milby high, and Aiken from San Jacinto. Suggestions for a freshman dance were made by the president, although no definite arranegments were made. The first activity of the class was the reception given by the sophomores, Friday, October 9, honoring the freshman class. War On Sheet Plague! War is declared! General N. K. Dupre and his Flip minute men (20 squirts per minute) have started mobilization and direction of forces against the swamp invaders who wrought destruction and distraction in the be- studentcd battlegrounds last On the first night of the invasion, Admiral Dupre and his flippant, flitting, Flip fly-fighters , went down in glorious defeat as the supply of ammunition dwindled to zero. Cy Shaw then promoted Sergeant Dupre to Rear ■ admiral PROVIDED that the gunner's mate would turn in a requisition for a new supply of mosquito-appetizer. On the second night, Admiral Dupre was demoted to private because of his ineffectiveness in directing such an undertaking. The mosquitoes not only chewed up all the flesh in school, but they proceeded to turn bookworms. Rifle shots echoed in every room. The students, hereafter referred to as mosquito bait, took to fistic violence. The plaguey pests under Colonel Drill-an-arm-or-leg-harder suffered several hundred casualties that night. Both sides went at it harder after an intermission of one day. The Flips sprayed harder and the mosquitoes bored harder, but neither (pronounced nyther) side was able to score a victory or suffer a defeat. The students did most of the suffering, by the way. After all of this dilly dallying, whatnot, "or sump'n", don't be surprised, and please don't laugh if you see some Cougaretes coming to the battlefront armed to the teeth (now we know why Cy Shaw wears boots to school) with a PRIVATE SPRAY "AND A CAN OF FLIP! are heve> The fellow thai, doesn't haye the spunk to sav 'you can't keep me out' will fail," concluded Doctor Ober. holtzer. During the formal procedure, members of the faculty were introduced to the freshmen of the college by Doctor Oberholtzer. Scholarships were awarded Miss Louise Shephard and Mrs. Cora Stratford, who hold the highest scholastic record for the past two years. Both had A records. LUNCHROOM RANKS AS BEST OF ITS KIND SOPHS SPONSOR DANCE AT END-0-MAIN HALL Approximately 125 H. J. C. students were present at a dance sponsored last '* Wednesday night, October 14, at "End O' Main" by the Houston Junior College sophomore class. . Music was furnished by Curtis Smith and his orchestra, and the "affair considered to be more of a success than the opening college dance of Ihe -year. Another dance will be given at the same address on Friday, October 2 for-the students of the Houston Junii college and Houston high schools. SOPHOMORE CLASSMEN NAME YEAR'S LEADERS Election of officers for the sophomore class of '31 was held Friday, October 3. Jimmie Bertrand was elected president. Other officers elected were: Harry D. Matthews, vice president; Christine Fitzgerald, secretary, and Gordon Jones, treasurer. Oct 23 H. J. C. Night at Westmoreland Farm Inn Friday night, October 23, has been designated as "Junior College Night" at Westmoreland Farm Inn, according to an announcement by the management of this popular night club. The club will be decorated in the school colors and all Junior college students will be given special privileges for the night. The management aso stated that if it has the co-operation of the students of t his institution, a regular dance night will be set aside for Junior college students once every two weeks- Music for this special dance will be furnished by "Lee's Owls", one of the outstanding college orchestras in the South. Admission will be Sl.00. In the lunch room of the Housti Junior college 175 men and women a served on Monday, Wednesday and Friday ant! between 50 and 60 on Tuesday and Thursday. Menus are changed every day. Five hot foods are offered with each meal,, and a choice of two salads and two desserts. We consume an average of 90 bottles of milk, nine pounds of bread, and 14 pounds of meat per day. Our lunch room is one of a group of 81 that is operated in Houston under the supervision of the Board of Education. Over 25,000 students are served daily and 3000 pounds of butter are used each week. Only the best products are used in these sanitary kitchens and a wholesome meal can be purchased for the low cost of 15 cents. A government inspection is rendered bi-annually and all employes are required to present health certificates at the beginning of each semester. Meals are scientifically planned and perfectly balanced. Miss Kimble is in charge of the lunch room division of the city and Mrs. George W. Browder of our own lunch GOOD YEAR SEEN FOR DRAMATICS, PUBLIC SPEAKING Plenty of Talent Available in School, Coach Harris Declares Houston Junior college Public Speaking and Dramatic Clubs promise a very successful year of intercollegiate activities. "There is plenty of public speaking and dramatic talent ,'n Houston Junior college," stated Harvey W. Harris, coach of the two classes. "Many old debaters are back, in addition to a number of new students whose records are encouraging." There will be two public speaking clubs, each meeting an hour every two weeks for public speaking contests and programs. And, in addition, a dramatic club is being organized. This club.is composed mostly of the members of the dramatic class which is being 'aught in the Houston Junior college for the first time this year. Another club is being formed, made up of all three clubs, whose membership is about 75 students. the intention of the coach to re-enter the Houston Junior college in the Texas Junior College Public Speaking association, which organization is composed of junior colleges only. Last year was the first time the Houston Junior college participated in the association, making a very fine record in each event—girls' debate, boys' debate, girls' oratorical contest, and boys' oratorical contest. The Dramatic club has chosen a three-act comedy drama, entitled "Why Husbands Go Wrong", to be presented just before Christmas. This play was written by Murray H. Fly. Mr. Harris, while instructing in Sul Ross State Teachers college in the summer of 1930, had the privilege of meeting Mr. Fly and working with him in producing the play; Mr. Harris praised this play very much, stating that it has everything that goes to make a good three-act comedy drama. The cast has not been announced at this time. Villa de Santiago By Harvey B. Richards, Jr. As the early morning mists rise to the peaks of the Sierra Madres, skirting the city of Monterrey, Mexico, they lift above the quaint little village of Village de Santiago. Its hillside setting, its quiet dusty streetsr clean white abode houses, all give the atmosphere of a peaceful and tranquil exist- ance- In passing down the narrow streets, we see some stiring among the natives. They are anxious to complete the morning chores before the sun rises above the peaks of the mountains and heats the day, but are loath to hurry, for hurrying is a waste of time and time is in abundance in Mexico. Heavily laden burros, two wheeled ox carts drawn by slow and awkward oxen, women carrying huge jars of water and small children clutching to their lo^K heavy skirts. lo^g make up the street scene of Villa de Santiago. When we look at this spectacle of quaint houses and strange things, we wonder how a village like this started. There is always a mythical version as to beginnings of such settlements, and after a tiresome search we come in contact with the village story teller, who, proudly and elabo- (Continued on Page 4) FIVE HUNDRED NEW BOOKS ON SHELVES OF COLLEGE LIBRARY Five hundred new books have been placed on the shelves of the Houston Junior college library since the opening of the fall term. Every department has been enriched by the addi- dition. of the latest books in its. field. To name a few—in the economic section there are Hamilton's "Control of Wages;" and Thorpe's "Economic Institutions," both timely questions discussed by economic authorities. In science there are such books as Guggenheimer's "Einstein Theory Explained and Analyzed," Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World," Jean's "Mysterious Universe," all of which would be of interest to the general student as well as the scientist. "Walpole's England," edited by Alfred Bishop Mason, is a distinct addition to the history department. Volumes 11 and 14 have been idded to the set of Cambridge Modern Histories, bringing this set up to date. Those interested in collections of short stories will new find a most complete list in that section, including the well known O. Henry stories, Thomas Nelson Page's "In Ole Vrginia," La- facdia Hearn's "Some Chinese Ghosts," May L. Becker's "Golden Tales of the Old South" and many others. A book of special intevest to every Texan is J. Frank Dobic's "Corr.nado's Children." Mr. Dobie is a native Texan and the story he has written is of the old Southwest, a tale of lost mines and buried treasures.
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