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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 7, February 15, 1933
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 7, February 15, 1933 - File 002. February 15, 1933. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/19/show/16.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 15, 1933). The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 7, February 15, 1933 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/19/show/16

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 7, February 15, 1933 - File 002, February 15, 1933, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/19/show/16.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 6, No. 7, February 15, 1933
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. VI, No. 7, February 15, 1933
Contributor
  • Julian, James L.
Date February 15, 1933
Language English
Description From title page: "Published by the journalism students of the Houston Junior College."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR THE COUGAR Gutter Gossip Editor Associate Editor Assistant Editor . Managing Editor Faculty Advisor —James Julian -C. W. Skipper - L. P. Marshall -- A. Marks - -F. R. Birney Departmental Exchange Editor Frances Nesmith Humor Editor —- Bob Stallings News Editors _ John Hill, Jesse Darling Feature Editors Elmer Hamilton, Mary Esther Waggoner, Milton Gregory Business Manager Business .Minnie Topek Advertising Manager . _ __ ..Kitty Hurlock Reporters Elizabeth King, Cortis Lawrence, Flossie White, Hope McCutcheon, Tommie Cooksey, Jill Jenkins, Isabel McDaniel, Mrs. Ruby Brittion, Max Cohen. Why Not? It was really encouraging to hei group of students discussing the nual sophomore prom to be given soon and stating their desires that it be a barn dance. But what can a few boys do if the whole class will not stand behind their suggestions and make some of their own? If we stand aside and do nothing, the ball will be a plain, cut and dried semi-formal affair, which is the only kind of dance we have ever had. What is the matter with everybody' Sophs attend meetings only to hear someone get up and say that a semi- forrnal dance is the only kind we can have, and the matter is dropped. Many have expressed their desire for a barn dance. Not a costume or any kind of elaborate or ridiculous exhibitions, but one where all the boys wear corduroy trousers with slip-over sweaters and the girls wear sport outfits gingham dresses with hair ribbons to natch. H we are to be a college, lets be coDegiate and get out of the habit of ordering plain vanilla. We go to dance to have fun, not to stage fashion parade, so let's have one real good time. Universities and other colleges do it! Why should we be a stick in the mud? Let's go to the next soph meeting and tell the old boys that we have gone hot-cha, and that we are going to make history with a barn dance and a good time. Mud 'N Yer Eye Jess because they call him Darling thinks he's the sweetheart of H.J.C. See we lost quite a few friends when the term ended but we also gained a few new ones. But tell me, have you seen anyone who can fill Lou Gaines' shoes? And what rowdy dowdy couple spends plenty of their, time in that big La Salle parked in front of the school? Fresh from the gutter, Johnny Nicholson will go for anything with a skirt on, and James Coulson, the ravishing redhead, can carry the mail. What's come over Fax Moody. She's so quiet now you would never know she's around the school. Can it be that she is taking her studies seriously after all these years. Who's Smartt? Any girl that stays away from him is. The brute! JACED SQUOINTS <$, And the cold weather brought forth: Potent scarlet socks on Helen Wood. Them thar ridin' boots on Ethel Margaret Falk and Mary Elizabeth Horan. A "Ripley" by Fred Aebi the fervent fermenter of feminine felicity — you know Frederick Augustus Lieck wears them, but what boresome who could suspect our FRED of warm winter woolies? (long). And the new term brought fifth: Jenny Waite, fledgling from San Ja- Evelyn Coffey, also fledges, but a reenters H.J.C. nevertheless. Both are excellent dancers and stimulating as their names of gin and coffee. (Boy, oh, oh — Boy. They should pay us for advertisements like this.) "Chop-House Charlie" has low- priced food and a boom blare radio that lures: (Phillips Cafe—to you). Virginia Cotten, Wilma Lindsey, Evelyn Coffey, and around one table without males. Why? Anne Owen (and is Pat Foley rushing her?) Marjorie Willke, and Kath- Berry with heavy attendance by Sonny Lamar and Charlie Giraud. I want to see Elmer Hamilton dress up in his modest freshman regalia for this Freshman Reception—just to show students an authentic "Frosh" appearance. A bit of opening philosophy: Cupid hits the mark, yet he Mrs. it! Paul Nordling: "Don't you think my mustache is becoming?" It may be coming, Paul, but it hasn't showed up yet. News item: Girl gets pearl from oyster. That's nothing, how about that Ji College co-ed who got a diamond from A little scandal: We believe Jack Brown and Janeva Jacobs, biology lab assistants, are in love. This may be news to some of you readers, but notice them sometime and see for yourself. Virginia Cotten claims it's a woman's privilege to change her mind, but her case is doubtful whether would work any better. Nomination for H. J- C-'s most frisky walker—Hamp Robinson. In cidently he is studying medicine. "I'r going to be a sort of dry doc," wise cracks Hamp. Allan Marshall pre-Law student is already on his first case. XXX (marks do not stand for kisses). If there had been several students to take the interest that Eddie Cher- nosky did in ice hockey, H.J.C. would have had an unbeatable team. Con- gratz Eddie! Twenty thousand years in Sing Sing may seem a long time, but if he lives that long Donald Aitken can write about 10,000 years in H.J.C. It will take him that long to finish. After seeing Katherine Munger, swanky platinum, the Junior College boys have gone off the gold standard! Rumor has it that one of our profs is so absent-minded that he addressed his class as "Gentlemen." Dick: "You look just like a million dollars." Kitty: "Yes, and I'm just as hard to The Height of Gall: George Hedrick sitting on the street car attempting flirtation with Mildred Learned who was standing before him! Mr. Miller: (In history class) Cleopatra is one of the most remarkable figures in history. Joe Green; (Wisecracking) Is, or had? Ed (Tarzan) Smartt and Ethel Falk ere walking down the hall when they decided that they were cold. So they tried the cover of darkness! A bit of parting philosophy: Punctuality is the art of guessing how late the other fellow is going to be. PEN POINTS— (Continued from Page 1) lege's most beautiful and most popular girl. Heretofore we have been fortunate in the selection of our girls— and from those seen in our halls today—we should be even prouder. There are some fine examples of beauty here among us — well, start looking around and begin thinking about the most beautiful and most popular girl on the campus. Maybe this can be used as a sug- ^3 tion: Choose a girl who is natural, unassuming and a typical college student, some one we can well be proud of this year. Naturally the girl will have to have beauty—however, if she has the above mentioned qualities, she bound to have beauty. Oscar (Le's rassel) Nolan must be slipping. Looks like he finally met his match. IN MEMORY No more will his kind face be seen about the vicinity where he so often frequented, for he is dead. Yes, Old Bill is dead! We bemoan the loss of this aged figure who was never known to speak an unkind word to anyone. Bill was a tireless worker during his lifetime. He worked from sun-up to sun-down. He was a son of the soil. Bill must have come from that soil in which he worked so faithfully for a lifetime, because little is known about his early life. He served faithfully until the end, and for industrious labor and diligent toil Bill had no peer. Despite Old Bill's industrious application to work once he got started—he had one grave mis-giving—he had to be driven to work. But once at work. Bill was no slacker. In fact he died with the harness on. No wonder! Old Bill was a plow- horse. THE CITY EDITOR By A. MARKS The city editor's job on a thriving daily must surely be fraught with many hardships. How else could the brave men who attempt the job become so fearless in one short lifetime? I know many city eds. I am their good friend. Yet don't feel at home around them. Maybe they have to be that way. Rushing in upon the eternal racket of a daily newspaper, the gushing reporter has a perfect scoop. His self- confidence and pride is unbeatable, and his nerve is unquenchable and unsquelchable before any and everything—except his own city ed. Bursting in that office, with the scoop under his arm, the aforesaid headstrong reporter seats himself un- movable upon the very desk of the king of the office. "Ed," he bellows, "Shell is moving their offices here- The vice-president let it out to me this morning I think his tongue slipped, but I've got it down verbatem. . . ." "What of it, Joe?" Ed says, not even looking up from the game of checkers, ... The staff photographer jumps two kings. ... Ed ain't in such a good humor. "Ed, don't you realize the importance of such a move? Don't you see that Houston will soon be the metropolis of the oil industry. . . . Don't you see what that transfer means to stocks?" Ed nonchalantly answers a phone that has been ringing for fully ten minutes and informs the party that "She will probably be in before eleven." . . . Then he turns again to his checkers. Joe sticks the story on the checker board, and Ed looks up at him with fire in his eyes . . . Joe picks up his story, and Ed moves a red king, , The staff photog fights his pipe, "Say, Ed," the reporter finally pleads in entirely different tones. "Take this story. It'll scoop the two evening papers by a whole day, . . . Gimme a break." "Copy boy!!!!!" Ed shouts, above the din. The copy boy strides in quickly, and it looks like Joe's story will finally travel the way of all flesh. "Say, son," Ed brawls to the young kid, "Haven't you bought me thaf darned Liberty yet? I been waiting for it 15 minutes already." "They don't have one across the street," the copy boy apologizes seriously. "Listen you little sonovagun, don't you come back into this office until you bring me a Liberty." "Yessir.". . . and all that time Joe looks on anxiously. "How about this Shell story, now?" he gets up enough courage to politely inquire. "Have you read today's Chronicle?" Ed asks. "Nope," Joe replies, "Been too busy on that scoop." "Well look on page 15 by the mortuary column kid, I think you'll see the same story with a 10 point head." And the staff photographer loses another man. That's just the way it goes. BOYS' CLUB— (Continued trom Page 1) must maintain at least a "C" average in scholastic standing, thus insuring an increased interest in school work. Present membership totals 20. Various smbers will be added until a total of is reached, which is the limit set by the club's constitution. Pledges accepted into the Guild for initiation at the last meeting are: James Coulson, Harry Gray, Ed Boyle, L. P. Marshall, Malcolm Peck, and John Hill. Jinglings of Jill PHARMACY CHARTERED Almeda Pharmacy, Holman avenue at LaBranch street, was incorporated this week with capital stock of $10,- 000. The firm is eight years old. Incorporators were B. J. Thigpen, George M. Garmany and C. D. Ehr- hardt, owners. An election of officers will be held in a few days, Mr. Thigpen said. To Jesse Darling goes the credit of having the loudest mouth at Junior College. This human foghorn can easily be heard from the third story when he is talking modestly on the ground floor. Speaking of large mouths — the statue of Liberty has an oral groove that is three feet wide. She and Jesse should get together sometime. "What's the use of looking up the meaning of words," says Billy Gandy. "I can't understand what the dictionary says anyway." Overheard a( a recent dance: Donald Aitken: "Will you get off my feet." Evelyn Coffee: "How far will I have to walk?" One of Jr. College's blonde lady- killers ended up in the "hoosegow" last week, and had to call on one of his profs to come bail him out so he could come to class.- Better watch those sawdust nickels, Milton! The above incident may result in various and sundry excuses being offered for absences from class. How does this sound? "Gee, Mr. Harris, I just couldn'* make my English class. You know, after all, a man's first obligations is to his jail." Several students have expressed the opinion that Le Roy Melcher's picture (which appearel in the Houston Post recently) somewhat resembles Kay Francis. Le Roy disclaims any similarity, but we think he is secretly pleased. Eh, Le Roy? The cold weather, besides bringing forth its usual quota of red noses, caused Elmer Hamilton to dig up his spats and sport them around the campus. Elmer (accent on first E) has beer, endeavoring to set up spat- wearing as a precedence around H. J. C.'s campus. The only trouble is that spats look like long underwear gone out of control. Lesson in Science: Did you ever see a goldfish when it wasn't moving? Try to sneak up on one and catch it asleep sometime! Further Lessons: Did you ever see Pat Foley when he was moving? Try to sneak up and catch him awake some time. By the way, goldfish is one word, same as poornsh. Get the resemb- And was James Coulson's face red when he had to walk across the stage in assembly the other night! So was his. hair! SHOW BUSINESS " Love Me Tonight," co-starring Alice Clare Luckel, pop-eyed, silver tongued beauty, and Hamp Robinson, God's gift to tho weaker sex. Hamp dishes out love in large quantities, and Alice Clare shows how she can take it The theme of this musical comedy concerns this young couple, who accidentally meet when two airplanes crash. The main love scene takes place while the planes are crashing to the ground. When the planes come to earth, they land upside down, and Hamp bursts into the theme song—"Wasn't It Romantic." "Horse Feathers", Harpo, Donald Aitken; Groucher, Pat Foley; Chico, Leroy Melcher; and Zeppo, Fred Aebi. This picture is truly the season's biggest hit. Groucho Foley turns in an excellent performance as the father of Fred Aebi, handsome college sheik. The plot is thickened with plenty of drama and pathos. No one gets killed though, and they all live happily ever afterwards.
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