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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930
File 004
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 004. October 3, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/185.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 3, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/185

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 004, October 3, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/185.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 1, October 3, 1930
Contributor
  • Keach, Maurine
Date October 3, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript THE COUGAR STANT COWLEY WORLD TOUR— (Continued from Page 3.) ing along the coast of Japan. \Ve peet to be In Kobe early Sunday morning and 1 am going to have the whole day free to see everything. It has been thirty-eight days since left New Orleans and we have gone approximately eight thousand miles. The weather was fairly good across the Pacific, but it was awfully erratic and we have had rough seas, smooth seas, fog, sleet, and a lot of cold and wind. Last Sunday we Into a cyclone and we rolled and tossed until Monday morning. The wind blew at about sixty miles an hour full against us and our speed was reduced to tWo knots an hour. Monday morning it started to snow and the snow flakes were positively blowing parallel with the sea. It was awfully good excitement while it lasted and I weathered it just like an old "salt." "It is now five o'cock on Sunday morning and I have just finished scrubbing the mess hall. We are now- going along the coast of Japan and we won't get to Kobe until noon as we were greatly delayed Friday night by rain and fog. I have seen very litle ot Japan ao far—only the coast and a lot of fishing boats—and so I can't tell you anything about it as yet. Yesterday, however, we saw the great Fuji Yama and it was a very pretty sight. Fuji Yama means "Sacred Mountain" and the Japanese have a great respect for this peak, In fact almost worship it. It is 12,365 feet high and is shaped just like a perfect cone, the top of it being capped with snow throughout the year. We also passed O Shima Island where there Is a active volcano with smoke coming out of the top of it. The Captain told me that there are quite a few islands with active volcanoes on them around here and we shall see more of them on the way down to Celebes. EDITOR'S NOTE. Mr. Cowley continue his story In succeedini sues of the Cougar. We desire to express tbe sympathy of the entire student body to Miss Susan M. Pattlllo at this time of her bereavement In the loss of her father. Within the past nineteen months the tarn- I ily has suffered the loss of five of its members. Miss Pattillo has made her home with her father, Mr. George F. Pattillo, at 1540 Waverly. For many years their home had been in Houston. Mr. Pattillo was in his 90th year. Sickness came upon him while traveling in Colorado and he was HI only four days while they were In Denver. Interment was In Hous- Though not officially connected with tbe college yet we feel Miss Pattillo is a part of us because of her great assistance to the students in the library who are permitted to use the I hooks of the San Jacinto High school. ALUMNI AT RICE— (Continued from Page 1.) May Louise Thomsen, one of our A.A.s of 1929 Is making a good record at Rice and will get her sheep-skin this June. Dorotha B. Green, one of the 1929 A. A.s was at Rice last year and took a course at our college this summer. She has chosen to go to the University of Texas this year where she is a senior. William A. Pollard, with us in 1927- S, was working in the oil business the year following. Last year he made a good record at Rice. Marguerite Kennedy, 1929 A.A., attended Rice last year but now is working in town. She hopes to return to Rice next September after having saved up some "bucks." Stella M. Schulda entered Rice last September but during the winter was taken ill and hence was able to complete only part of the course. She is improved in health and back with the usual determination to do good work. We of the first days of H. J. C. will remember with a warm feeling deep down in our hearts Annie Ray Qualtrough with that sweet smile and winning ways, etc to make the boy heart ache. Well, she has not let all these outside things interfere with her studies. Louise E. Frerichs will "make good as she always has. We will hear of her among the celebrities! Come one, come all for a rousing cheer for good scholarship! ROMELDA SASS GRID TEAM— (Continued from page 1) seems to have the edge in the choice of quarterback because of his experience and blocking ability. This quick-starting back has shown Improvement over last year's form and expected to see much service for the Cougars. At halves there is a wide choice. Bill Cox and Johnson, a formidable man from Palestine High, are scheduled for the starting positions, bow- French is blessed with two powerful men, Black and McKibben, at the fullback position. Black, who weighs 200 pounds and is a splendid kicker and passer as well as line plunger of merit, Is considered to have an edge McKibben. This other candidate. who tips the scales at 18f «e fast and a more than capable reserve for the husky Black. The squad of 26 men left Houston this morning in cars and expected to arrive at Waco in time to rest up a bit and later attend the Reagan High- Waco game to be played at night under the lights of the Cotton Palace Stadium. FIRST GRADUATE OF HJC WINS BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE FACULTY CHANGES— (Continued from page 1) the Spanish Department. Miss Stock- ard received her Bachelor of Arts de- [ gree at the University of Texas and j Master of Arts degree at Baylor Uni- j.versity and has had the opportunity I for graduate study in Madrid and ' Barcelonia. For three years Miss ! Stockard has been connected with the Houston Public Schools. , Mr. H. Z. Nigro has joined the j English Department for part time ■ work while at the same time being i principal of Taylor School. Mr. Nigro ! received his B. A. degree at Baylor ! University and M. A. from Columbia j University. He has also graduate work in the departments of English j and Education at the Universities of California and Michigan. Mr. P. K. Rees, brother of the Mr. Rees who came to Junior College last year, has joined the mathematics department. Mr. Rees received his B. A. degree at Southwestern University in 1923 and M. A. degree in 1925 at the University of Texas. He has taught at Texas Technical School and the University of Mlsssissippi at Oxford, Miss. In connection with hia part time teaching at Junior College, Mr. Rees Is taking graduate work at Romelda Sass, '29, Receives Degree at Sam Houston State Teachers' College Miss Romelda Sass. one of the graduates of 1929 of the Houston Junior College, is the first to receive the degree of B.A. Miss Sass graduated from Sam Houston Senior High School in January, 1927, and entered the Houston Junior College in September of that year. During her two years in college, she took a very prominent part in college activities and was among the prime workers of the Girls Pep Club. Miss Sass graduated with a very high record of scholarship in college and has continued the good work started here. During the summers of 1928 and t. 1929, Miss Sass attended college the |™tr.f;,,,at first part being at Houston Junior College, and the latter at Sam Houston State Teachers College, Huntsville. Her high scholarship has permitted her to take extra work at college, entering Sam Houston Sate The following additions have I was at Nacogdoches: Miss Mary [Adele Cobb, a graduate of San I Jacinto Hfgh School, who was in colli ege last year; Miss Mary Ellen Hen- i derson, a graduate of Teachers Col- I lege at Denton and at present also j teaching in the Hamilton Junior jHigh School; Miss Helen Higgins, a. {graduate of San Jacinto High School; ! Miss Zelda Osborn. a graduate of San i Jacinto, who was in college last year: [Miss Isabella Ventresca, a graduate of Sam Houston High School; Miss Merlyne Miller, a graduate of Jefferson Davis High School and a student in college last year. Coach French Is one of these strong, silent men who does not say much, and means it. He was "raised" in the Northern Pacific region; he played football at the University of Idaho, was wounded In action during the World War, and has coached and worked as director of Physical Education in numerous places. He was line coach at Pacific University in 1926 when that institution won the- conferenco championship. He lias a Master's Degree from Columbia University, Miss Stockard is very enthusiastic about Spanish. "Spanish," she said, "is by far the easiest foreign language." Upon inquiry she thought that any ordinarily intelligent student may easily pass the course it he applies himself well, "and especially if he has a gift for languages. made in the department of chemistry: As assistant in Ihe freshman course. Mr. William Hurst comes from Boston, Mass. Mr. Hurst is an honor .graduate with the degrees of B. S. Ch. E, and M. S. Ch. E. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addition to his duties at the Junior College, Mr. Hurst is a chemical engineer for a large oil ooncern in Houston. The other addition to the department is Mr. Tedrow Swaim, a former student of the Houston Junior College. He made the highest grades in chemistry since the opening of the Junior College. He has also done considerable work in industrial cheni- local laboratory. Mr. chemical stock superintendent. At the present time he is also employed at the local 0. S. ,, Bureau. The library will be able to give mueh better service to the student body with the addition of a force TIDBITS Ed Knowles: "Is my pal, Harry, a gentleman?" Lucille Bowden: "Yes, but I think I can break him of it." Mr. Ledlow (to Eco. Class): "Here is a very instructive reference that I want the clnss to look up. I don't remember the name of the magazine, nor do I recall the year nor the month, and the name of the article- has quite slipped my memory, but if you find it I am sure you will find It very interesting." (Exit class in wild disorder to hunt the article.) Teachers College, she was permitted wh,c" wil1 Sive two assistants during to carry six instead of the regular the entire ach°o1 Deriod as contrasted five course and for the term received t° merely one for four hours daily last credit of the grade "A" in each year. Those assisting in the library -re the following: Miss lone Brown ho comes from Orange and last year course. Miss Sass completed the require- lents of the course In August and received the Bachelor of Arts degree Ihe recent commencement at Huntsville. She thus is the first graduate of Houston Junior College -eceive the B.A. degree, iss Sass is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Sass, whose :e is at 1817 Gano Street, Houston. School Supplies Printing—Lithographing Engraving—Embossing Office Supplies STANDARD Printing & Litho. Co. Phone Preston 3648 1207-1211 CAPITOL AVENUE (Opposite Post Office) ^akowitzjfeoj On Main at Rusk Now is the time here is the place To sign up for COUGAR belt buckles, class pins and rings, club jewelry and any special designs or arrangements that may suit your fancy. A Sweeney representative will call at your request. Prices are most reasonable. "IT HWeng jewelry ~*JOO MAIN STREET CORNER CAPITOL «• 'Jewelry (d.
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