Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930
File 003
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 003. October 3, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 2, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 3, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/184

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 003, October 3, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 2, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/184.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 1, October 3, 1930
Contributor
  • Keach, Maurine
Date October 3, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE TEAM Top picture: Bottom row, left to right—P. G. Speer, C. Myres, Willard Nesmith, C. I. Whitehead and L. Green. Kneeling—Harry Mathews, Bill Cox, "Awful" Close, S. C. Warden, J. Moulden and R. reinert. Standing—Coach A. W. French, J. Oliver, D. A. Tapick, J. Stoddard, A. R. Pease, S. Kal- nans, T. Rhodes and C. Woods. Bottom picture: Mathews, Nesmith, Warden and Holmans, the letter men of the squad. World Tour Made By H. J. C. Student Stant Cowley, First Houston Student to Work Way Around World, Gives Vivid Account of Interesting Travels FACULTYMEMBERS BACK FROM VISITS IN INTERESTING PLACES President E. E. Oberholtzer devoted some weeks this summer to study at Columbia University In the fields of Curriculum Revision and School Admin ist ration. After a long absence due to prolonged sickness, we are greatly pleased to have Dean F. M. Black with us again. After assisting in the opening of the summer session of the college, Assistant Dean N. K. Dtipre went to Camp Eagle, Kerrville, where he was director of the boys' camp. Bursar H. W. South has been never ceasing in his important task in college. Though he had a busy time during the summer session, Mr. South remained in town the entire summer to attend to the correspondence of the college. Vet there arc a new lot of fish stories. Ask him to tell you some of them. Mrs. Kathleen R. Duggan with Mr. Duggan enjoyed a much needed rest this summer which included motor trips in Texas, to the Carshad Caverns in New Mexico and some places In Oklahoma as well as a trip to Monterey, Mexico- Mrs. John R. Render acted as registrar during the summer session and remained in the city during the sum' mer. We are very glad Mrs. Bender is much improved in health after the severe operation which was necessary this summer. Mrs. Hannah Shearer was very busy in the library during summer school. During the remaining weeks she visited trends in Lufkln and elsewhere. Mr. Fred R. Birney and family spent two hot months in cool Colorado having a grand time playing and forgot all the troubles of conducting the school periodicals. Mr. Samuel L. Biskin was engaged this summer in research work with one of the oil companies In Houston- His public speaking reputation took Mr, Harvey W. Harris to the Sul Ross State Teachers College at Alpine after tbe closing of the summer session of our college. Excursions were made lo the Carlsbad Caverns and in company with some seventy teachers and students to Ohihwahua, Mexico where they were entertained by the professors, the mayor and various municipal organizations. Mrs. Harris and the children also spent the weeks of the second summer session at Alpine. Professor S. W. Henderson after the close of our summer session took some courses in Education at the University of Texas. Mr. J. A. Herriiigton spent the summer in experimental work in the laboratory of the Hughes Tool Company. Miss Mildred Hubbard spent part of the summer in Houston and also visited iti several places in East Mr. Alva L. Kerbow and family remained in Houston this summer. Mr. James 11. Ledlow says he spent the summer in Houston trying to keep cool. Why here? In addition to his accounting, he huilt him a fine residence at 2315 Quenby Road. Miss Dorothy Mackey in company with a "lady pal" motored way into Wisconsin to attend the State University. Week-ends were enjoyed in visiting the beautiful lakes and such places of interest as the Wisconsin Dells where is held the spectacular annual Indian ceremony. The return trip included Niagra Pal's, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Louisville, Memphis and the Mammoth Cave, Kentucky. Mr. Smart Mackay reports Mr. Harris to be a bum golfer but a champion watermelon eater and .a crack rifle shot. Mr. Mackay became disgusted with playing golf with Harvey so he played tennis instead. Mr. Mackay while attending Sul Ross Slate Teachers College was elected to membership of the Sul Ross Chapter of the Scholarship Society of the South. Mr. M. A. Miller after a busy time in the summer session, spent the remaining weeks in Houston. Get him to tell his fish stories. Mr. Wallace H. Miner and wife visited in Minnesota at the home of Mrs. Miner's parents and other relatives. Mrs. E. S- Montgomery, after teaching in the summer session of the Junior College, spent a restful summer in Houston. Miss Margaret Patrick, after teaching in the summer session of the college, spent the summer in travel and study. Mr. Warren A. Rees reports he built a stoiie castle on his forty acre ranch near Kerrville and invites us yto come and make him a visit next summer. Miss Pearl Rucker spent six weeks in Chicago in the study of art and Research work, after which she took a two weeks motor trip through Yellowstone and Glacier Parks. Mr. E. W. Sehuhmanu and family spent the summer in Houston. Mrs. Floy P. Soule spent the summer in Houston. Miss Lulu M. Stevens refuses to tell all she did and where she was this summer. Miss Sue C. Thomason reports all quiet in Huntsville this summer as the plan to "free the prisoners if elected" was not put in effect. Mr. G. W. Vauzee after the summer session made a trip to Illinois for some weeks. The call of the sea came to our fellow student last winter in a splendid opportunity to join tbe S. S. "Slem- mestad" whose captain had been known to the family for many years, and Stant Cowley set out on the voyage of adventure, leaving Port Houston on March 20th, 1930. The first port made was New Orleans where Cowley met many of his former friends and school mates who greatly envied him his fine opportunity. The task assigned him was that of Third Mate, so we can credit him with the accomplishment of keeping the ship off the rocks and keeping it on Its course as though he were an experienced hand. Writing to one of his teachers and school mates he says regarding the passage of the Panama Canal: "I could not hope to be able to fittingly describe this famous passage to you, as it has to be seen to be appreciated, but I will attempt to give you some impressions in the hope that they may be of interest to you and the history class. From the Atlantic you come to the small town of Colon and pass up Colon Channel to the Gatum locks. This lock consists of three chambers in which the ship is raised up for eighty-five feet to the level of Gatun Lake. This is an artificial lake and was formerly a fertile valley. It is 164 miles in area and is dotted with many islands—formerly the tops of hills and mountains. Over this lake you go almost half way across the isthmus to Culebra Cut. This is a channel that has been cut through a mountain. It is nine miles long and has been hewn through solid rock. It Is certainly an amazing sight to see and makes you marvel at the greatness of the work that has been done. You are now on the Pacific side and come to Pedro Miguel lock when you are lowered thirty feet. Two miles further on you are lowered flffy-fi' feet by the Miraflores locks and then you are in the Pacific Ocean. In of the locks, the vessel is handled on both sides by three mighty electric towing locomotives. Everything is done with clock-like precision and ease and a high degree of efficiency. Uncle Sam has the canal well fortified and there are airplanes overhead and warships in the water on either side. In all. It is a magnificent, perfect machine and a wonderful sight San Pedro, California On April 11th they arrived at San Pedro. California, which is the port of Los Angeles. The steamer was In port for eleven hours, taking bunker oil for fuel. The 1500 tons were to last for the voyage of six months or about the entire trip around the world. While In harbor there was a life boat drill. The crew was ordered to lower the life boats and take a brisk row for some time—yes, too long a time for the new ones. But they were glad to have the experience should there come the need in case of danger. This is a routine exercise required every two months. The trip from Panama was made In ten and one half days, and on reaching San Pedro they had completed 4.500 miles of the long voyage. The time did not drag for there was penty of interest happening continually. They kept in touch with the outside world daily by radio and there was printed the dally ship's "News Paper." Approaching Japan Writing on the date of May 4th while still in the Pacific Ocean, Stant Cowley continues to describe the pas- sago. "Well, we have now crossed the Pacific Ocean and tonight we are go- (Continued on Page 4.) 1930 Xmas Cards Now Ready for Selection ORDER EARLY "A PLEASURE TO SHOW ^LSON>!SSJ(b. Ht) ^•loneriPrmlefS.Enirawrs.OffwOiilfllters <)£) Two Stores 508 Fannin 1103 Main WOOD & PURDY SPORTING GOODS COMPANY tie Outfitters :: Felt Emblems and Pennants Made to Order Hunting and Fishing Supplies » Capitol 2613 1317 Capitol Avenue Caonia Powers: "Deceiver, I hate you!" Kendal Eilunan: "But yesterday you said you loved every hair on my head." Calonia Powers: "But not every hair on your shoulder." "Where Quality, Service and Experience Count" BILAO'S SHOE SHOP Special Atention Paid to Ladies' Shoes A TRIAL IS ALL I ASK PHONE PRESTON 7910 1108 Capitol Avenue W. C. Munn Company We're costuming collegiennes—and very smartly! W. C. MUNN COMPANY *A store of youth *A store of fashion #A store of . . . moderate price
File Name uhlib_10270243_v004_n001_003.jpg