Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930
File 002
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 002. October 3, 1930. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(October 3, 1930). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/183

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930 - File 002, October 3, 1930, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/186/show/183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 1, October 3, 1930
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 1, October 3, 1930
Contributor
  • Keach, Maurine
Date October 3, 1930
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR The COUGAR Issue Editor Alumni Editor EDITORIAL STAFF .Maurine Keach Intercollegiate and Exchange Editor Feature Writer Faculty Advisor Margaret A Boyett, H. 0435 Ferne Sweeney, T. 4915 ... . Lois Duff, P. 4585 -Fred R. Birney Managing Editor .... Circulation Manager Assistant Circulation Manager .. Assistant Advertising Manager . Business Manager Assistant Business Manager . Faculty Managing Editor . . . BUSINESS STAFF Maxwell Ludtke Wallace H. Miner. L. 4482 ASSEMBLY ILLS Here is something that might be mistaken for an editorial, and you needn't stop up your ears when you read it—it may do you good. Whatever else it may come to, it is headed for a most radical attack upon a terrible, awful barbarian impulse. What old impulse? You know very well! Nevertheless we are going to proceed with the delivery of this descantatien. As one Nellie Revell was wont to say, we feel the urgent need to "get It off our chest." "Why We Behave Lake Human Beings." There, someone raised the question, but we aren't so much concerned with that. What we really want to know is why we human beings behave ■like participants of a "nigger break-down" when in Assembly Maybe it is the hoodlum instinct. At any rate, that was a swell brawl we had In the auditorium Wednesday night. We never before had the pleasure of seeing such riotous merry-making where no drinks were served. We assume we didn't miss anything. Far he it from us to say that Assembly has not its grievous faults. Sure and it has now. There should be changes. Now you expect to read that the faculty is to blame for not making the exercises more interesting, hut we believe the error lies with two other people. We are going to knock you into an eight cylinder stupor by stating that the change should come within the student body. You will never get any more interest from a thing than you put into it. We are laying off the faculty this time, because we believe ti»t they have the benefit of the doubt coming to them. They may have something really good to say. Ever thought of that? Let's give them a chance to be heard and then if we don't like it, we can make suggestions of what we would like. What they did say was "undubitably fus rate" but what we got of ie was nil. We can't say they didn't act up nobly when we didn't hear one word they said. We modest violets who lack the tlpierity to fight our way to the very front row missed out. Another thing about that front row—it won't accommodate all who really wish to hear; it's funny that way. In conclusion, we should like to pin the blue ribbons on the prize winning disturbers. The sophomore class as a whole gets the five gallon freezer of shrimp ice cream. Second place should go to the two young men on the thirteenth row, who curled one another's hair to the distraction of everyone around. They did credit to some cousins of their's who are now with Barnum and another man named Bailey. The rest of the exhibition was fair to middling and seemed to delight everyone. AUTO HORNS VS. INSTRUCTORS The merry battle continues. An instructor stands before a large class, lecturing. Students busily take notes. Everyone is interested, everyone is attentive. Suddenly, the blatant blare of a raucous automobile horn blasts the quiet of the college campus. Someone is coming into the drive. Someone else is already parked in the right-of-way. Hence, the horn. Several more cars enter the drive, and each in turn loosens its siren notes. But in this case, these notes are not welcome, enchanting melodies of the ancient sirens of the sea. Rather, they represent the musical melodies of the Chicago stock yards. Students turn their attention to the melee of sound originating in the drive. Instructors fight valiantly to overcome 'the static, but finally, in exasperation or else from pure exhaustion, give a despairing sigh and give up the futile attempt to be heard above the noise. And then, after five or thirty minutes of the battle of the horns, someone moves his car, and the procession, with a few- exultant toots of horns, proceeds ten or fifteen feet, until someone else stops. And then it all commences with renewed vigor. If students having "dates" would agree upon a meeting place near the campus, and would instruct their friends and parents to refrain from so much horn tooting, the quiet of the campus could be maintained, and class work could be accomplished. It is the earnest desire of the Cougar to co-operate in all worthwhile things. It wishes the friendship of students and faculty alike. But it is also duty-bound to caJl attention to such practices as this, and to fight for more quiet in the drives and more peace and quiet in the classrooms. PEP While "pep" may be the name of a popular breakfast food the type of pep which is being shown at H. J. C. this year is in a different field. Any one who attended the first two assemblies and heard the plans being laid for athletics this year must realize that the student body this year is alive and looking forward to a really successful year. LIBRARY FACILITIES SHOW IMPROVEMENT; MANY NEW VOLUMES Zelda Osborne Library facilities will be greatly improved this year, according to Mrs. Shearer, Junior College librarian. Approximately $1,000 worth of new books, covering every field except fiction, have been added. Among the most interesting books on psychology and sociology is "Five Hundred Criminal Cases" by Gluik. This should appeal to all students interested in criminology. On the history list are three new books on Mussolini and several biographies of historical characters; "Woodrow Wilson. Life and Letters." by Baker, is particularly interesting. Two new books on radio have been received- while mentioning science, we must not forget math books. Some of them are anything but "cut and dry" texts. Von discouraged math students should try those on the philosophy and tory of mathematics. The new literature books are so numerous, but they include poetry, the short story, and the social life of various periods. Sophomore Eng lish students should remember that Ihe "Travels of Sir John Mandeville" is now in the library. Since no fiction has been received, it is certain ahat all coutrbutions of good fiction (by students will be appreciated by the whole student body. Those who come to the library regularly seem to be using the newspapers and magazines more than formerly. The United States Daily is considered one of the best newspapers published and should be useful to government and history students. The New York Times, Including the magazine and book review sections, comes once a week and can be found on the newspaper rack. Likewise, a daily issue of the Post- Dispatch, which has been sent to the school complimentary for the past three years, can be found on the rack. Various interesting and useful magazines are to be found in the magazine rack at the left of the first entrance to the library. A typewritten list of the ones to be had is attached to tbe bookcase directly in front of the rack. In order that the library he properly organized and shall operate efficiently, co-operation on the part of students is necessary. Many who come to the library to study unmolested are greatly annoyed by the unnecessary noise made by fellow students. Co-operation and assistance in Improving this condition will be appreciated by all. A Well-Liked Pro/. We see him as he is seated there at his desk chatting with several students. One very seldom finds him alone. Those of us who know him will understand why. He Is not really busy for he is never too busy to spare a few minutes of his time listening to one of us. He is always willing to help us and enjoys having young people In his office. He is low in stature but he has an understanding heart filled with kindness and sympathy for those who choose his council. He is a Jolly fellow, who is fond of sports. Although his face is lined and his hair is gray, the marks 'of the slipping years, his ideas of pleasure are still young. If the path of life has been difficult his speech and manner do not Bhow it. If he feels that the burdens of life are growing heavy he does not weaken beneath the load. He seems to enjoy encouraging and comforting us. He does these little acts with such an easy manner that It is a comfort to be near him. He Is your friend, Mr. H. W. South. "Imagine my embarrass men I," said Frances Willard, "when, according to my custom, I looked under the bed before retiring. I had forgotten that is in an upper berth." Hugh Manford: "Darling, in the moonlight your teeth are like pearls." Minerva Mayfield: "Oh, indeed, and when were you in the moonlight with Pearl?" WILLIAM CLIFFORD HOGG real friend of educatio Conservatory Is Beautified Through Student Effort; Was in Original Plan Ruth Winifred Clapp Have you ever wondered just why San Jacinto High School has the pleasure of enjoying such a delightfully refreshing place as the conservatory? If you have wondered, then here is your answer: The conservatory, itself, was in the original plan of the building. Three years ago, at the persistent urge of the students, it was filled with ferns and palms. . Since then, the plants have been changed several times. Provision for the care of the conservatory was also provided for. In 1925, the Boys' Booster club provided for the erection of the fountain in gratitude and appreciation of Mr. T. A. Rogers' services at the school. Several clubs and the senior classes have contributed to the conservatory fund, but the main expense and upkeep is home by the Girls' Booster club. The i its •e. so pictures(]ui setting of dignified palms, vividly gref-n ferns, and the musical murmur of the little fountain, was bought by the Cirls' Booster club last year. The- court is equally as lovely as the conservatory. Many eiqulslte flowers are growing there this fall. Even poinsettas, the Christmas flower, that reminds one of some brilliant flame, are to be found there, while in the early spring, the girls will be able to "Tiptoe Through the Tulips." Have you noticed the little fountain in the court? It was built by money raised by one of Miss Melton's history classes for the fence around the athletic field. Miss Melton was greatly beloved, so the money was not used at all, but just put a.: inte.'est, Last year it was used to build the fountain In the court. Stop and really look at these things some time. Remember somebody has put forth a great deal of effort so that you and I might enjoy this natural beauty. INSTRUCTIONS FOR FRESHMEN All Freshmen must address upperclassmen as Mr All Freshmen must stand to address upperclassmen. All Freshmen must wear the Freshman cap at all student activities, outside the College building. On Wednesday all Freshmen must wear a green Windsor tie and green suspenders. On Wednesday no Freshmen will be allowed to ascend or descend the front stairways. While in the dining room, the Freshmen must be at the service of the upperclassmen. Freshmen must keep off the lawn. No Freshmen will be allowed lo smoke on the College campus. No Freshmen will be allowed in tbe Conservatory. Al Freshmen must attend all meetings sponsored by the Sophomore class and approved by the Assistant Dean. They must not be seen walking with any boy in the halls or ou the campus. They must voluntarily offer to carry upper class girls books, etc. They must ascend or descend front stairs. They must wear green hair-ribbons. They must wear straight line dresses without belts. They must wear low-heeled shoes. They must wear green bows on their right ankles. They must not use any cosmetics, not even powder. They must address the upper class girls as "ma'am", and must respond to all requests made by Sophomore girls. SING-SONG We are very green FRESHMEN SLIMES Sing, song, kitcliy, kitchy, kimeo. So we'll mind the SOPHOMORES AT ALL TIMES, Sing, song, kitchy, kitchy. kimeo. Kemo, kimo, karoway, make, mahi, ma rum sticks fummy-dlddle. Sunbug, pollywog, nincum, nitcat, Sing, song, kitchy, kitchy, kimeo.
File Name uhlib_10270243_v004_n001_002.jpg