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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 003. March 20, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 20, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 003. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/179

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 003, March 20, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/179.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 9, March 20, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date March 20, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript THE COUGAR THREE The Cougar Scientist VOL. I. NO. 3 i A psychologist declares that single men are more truthful than married ones. But then they are not asked so many embarrassing questions. Doctor: "H'm. Severe headache, bilious attacks, pains in the neck—h'm!" (Continuing to write) 'What is your age, madam?" Patent (coyly): "Twenty-four, Doctor." "H'm!" (continuing to write): "Memory affected, too?"—Life. The scientists who were unable to account for the dark weather prevailing in Europe seem to overlook the fact that Mr. Einstein is busy explaining his theory.—Boston Transcript. The surgeon had just operated on his barber, removing his appendix. "And now," said the surgeon, alter his patient had regained consciousness, "how about a little liver or thyroid operation? And your tonsils really do need trimming terribly." Fortunately, sustained oratory can't be prolonged by taking on more gas.— Memphis News-Scimitar. In spite of all this agitation against perjury, we notice that a Chicago motorist had the nerve to tell the judge, when arrested for speeding the other day, that he was on his way to the dentist's office.—New York Evening Post. Time to Calcimine.—A minister, In addressing his flock, began: As I gaze about me, I see before me a great many bright and shining faces. (Just then 87 powder puffs came out.) A Scotsman rang up a doctor in a state of great agitation. "Come quick," he said, "ma wee bairn has swallowed a saxpence." "How old is it?" as the Doctor. "1894." The fossilized remains of an extinct ganoid, or armor-plated fish, has been discovered in Southern Illinois. It must have lived in the Chicago River. —Judge. Small boy: I want some medicine to reduce flesh. Shop assistant: Anti-fat? Small boy: No, uncle. THROUGH A CHINESE MATCH FACTORY By C. R. Allen Sung Fat was the proud owner of the Pekin Match Factory—proud in his own peculiar way. So it was no difficult task to gain entrance to the factory, for Sung Fat was a friend of ours — friendship which we had developed while he was in America. The general appearance of the factory was one that only a Chinaman would be proud of, for it was al lutely "old style," following traditions that were handed down from years gone by. We first entered a hallway, dirty, damp, with dust flying everywhere. From this numerous other hallways, branched off; leading to a room for the mixers and dippers, to another where the dry ingredients for the match heads were ground, and to room for filling the boxes. In every case we found the rooms lacking cleanliness, ventilation and light. We were told by Sun Fat that, at the present time, he was doing a rushing business and that there were about 500 people now employed. We asked him how many men had. He replied, in a casual way, that he had about 50 men; 35 of them being used as mixers and dippers. We later found out that the rest of the people employed were young r boys, girls and women. We asked how much he paid his help, and we got one of the biggest surprises of our trip, for, in a most nonchalant manner, he said the average worker received about $5 per month, Sundays included. We v getting thoroughly disgusted with such an environment and left about noon Our last impression of this horril life was a true example of life at that factory. For sitting at their work benches, the workers ate their lunches with hands reeking with phosphorous —lunches which had stood for hours in the poisonous phosphorous fumes before being eaten. War and Chemistry By Mrs. Annie Roberts Wilcox The chemistry of war developed under the stress of the poison gas campaign during the world war. The term "poison gas" is a misnomer. Most of the chemicals which appeared on the battle field as gases were transported and projected as liquids or even as As the poison was developed, a large number of different chemicals became available by the opposing armies. These chemicals may be classified as asphyxiating, toxic, lachrymatory, burning, and sneezing. The first two classes produced a higher percentage oi deaths than the other three classes, but the latter were responsible for more casualties. The asphyxiating gases produced death by suffocation. The best known substances of these types were chlorine and phosgene, both used in the manufacture of dye. Chlorine was first used by the Germans in 1915 at the battle of Ypres. It was released from cylinders and produced a white cloud which slowly enveloped our wholly unprepared troops. Had the Germans had the vision and initiative to follow up this surprise attack of poison chemicals, they might have driven through to the channel ports and gained an immediate and decisive victory while the Allies were still struggling with the problem of respirators and gas helmets, and the production of means of retalia- The toxic compounds chiefly affected the nervous system. It was either kill or cure, for recovery was rapid from any concentration not causing death. Prussic acid is the best example of a toxic poison. Lachrymators were employed on a large scale. They produced temporary blindness by weeping. Ths introduction of vesicant or blistering compounds was the culmination of the use of chemicals in warfare. Mustard gas was the chief of these blistering compounds employed. It produced skin-burning which, though rarely mortal, put a man out of action for many months. The last class produced the familiar and annoying sneezing effect accompanied by intense pain and irritation of the nose, throat, and repiratory membranes. These were mostly arsenic compounds. It is a misconception that gas was only discharged from cylinders in huge clouds or used as artillery shells. A number of special weapons adapted for gas were developed—the Livens projector producing a gas cloud far from the point of discharge, and the Stokes used for rapid fire of large numbers of gas shells. Poison gas was used not only as an effective means of producing deaths and casualties, but it was employed to neutralize batteries, cross-roads, and render whole areas uninhabitable. The ground was often poisoned to a depth of several feet. Germany early abandoned cloud _ attacks because large gains of ground could not be obtained by this me and because of the enormous me and muscular effort required in i paring for a cloud gas attack. The cylinders had to be in position in s cial emplacements in the front lines within certain time limits. Naturally, all the work occurred in the dark. Picture to yourself the amount of mental and physical activity necessary to place 2,000 cylinders on a two-mile front,— the darkness, the possible enemy shell, the need for haste and care, the interference with the busy night-life of the trenches, the lead-like weight of the projectiles, the sudden flaring of shells making the after darkness more tense, the organization of thousand officers and men for this work, the filtering of these special groups into the front trenches without attracting the enemy's suspicion. The English improved both the magnitude and method of cloud-gas attack. They used it as an efficient means of local surprise. The chemical struggle became very intense in the summer and autumn of Our LoWec^eCufreoa^s Dear oh dear. I'm so lonesome— Where's Bobbie McCullough? Never see him anymore. Guess Julia Green will miss Fax Moody. Fax's going to Southwestern. Lookee! There's Louie Godard. The tall good-looking brunette. Wish he'd give me a break. But that's my luck. Strawberries! Two of 'em. I mean strawberry blondes. The two most prominent the school boasts of: Opal Beane and Hazel Taylor. Oh, Bobbie, where art thou going? going? It's Bobbie Branham tagging some lucky lil' femme. Palpitating heart be still. Here's my L. L. L. (long lost love) Cy Shaw. Hey there, Sonny! You know him. His real name is Harwood Staniker. A couple of new comers ambling around in no particular direction are C. E. Boykin and Margaret Moss. There's that cute and attractive Pauline Ault. Have you heard? Magda Sohle has at last turned chorus girl. She always vowed that she would. Hi there, Jim. It's James Morris, the bachelor. Speaking of blondes! Say, the rest of us had better hang together. Have you noticed Marguerite Comhaire? Plenty of reason! Did you know thati Harry D. Mathews plays the fiddle? Not only yes but uh huh! Cheerio, darling, 'till next time. Must toddle along. CUTIE 1917. Propector attacks multiplied, the use of chemical shells increased on both sides, gaa discipline tightened up, officers and men acquired a kind of gas sense—a peculiar alertness toward gas. At this stage mustard was the chief chemical used. Fortunately, its most fatal effects could be prevented by wearing a respirator. Mustard was the war gas par excellence for causing casualties. So much for chemical warfare of the past. The future is our chief concern. What would characterize the early stages of a future war? It would be distinguished by attempts of the v ous belligerents to win instant and decisive victory by various types of ; prises. Chemical surprise will depend upon peace industry, the organic chemical industry. German chemical industry was the vital factor of this : method of warfare employed in World War. The dy industry was i centrated almost exclusively in great firms located favorably to the front line. The only logical conclusion in regard to the outcomes of future wars, is that the country which does not possess z strong dye industry or enormously expensive chemical arsenals, can not hopi to escape serious military results, possible defeat from enemy chemical surprises. Let us then as patriotic, fore- sighted citizens, prepare for war time of peace. Let us not yield again the dye industry to be monopolized by any country. From the point of view of atrocity, gas has a hopeful outlook as compared with other weapons. Chemicals may be found which temporarily influence hu man functions, enabling military objec tives to be attained with a remarkably small amount of pain and death. SIGHT SEEING Whozit: "Do you see the young man standing over there next to the flivver with golf pants on?" Whyzit: "I see the young man right; but where is the flivver with golf pants on?" Society KIDD-SCOTT Reverend and Mrs. J. O. Kidd announce the marriage of their daughter, Ina Ruth, to William Harvey Scott. The wedding will take place at the North Side Methodist church, Sunday evening, March 22, at six-thirty o'clock. The service will be read by Reverend J. O. Kidd, the bride's father. Ruth Kidd was formerly a student of the Houston Junior College, where she was very popular. She held many offices, one of them being president of the Pep Club. The Pep Club will give a party in Miss Kidd's honor in the near future. SOPHOMORE BALL The annual ball to be given by the members of the sophomore class of H. J. C. will be held at the Lamar Hotel ballroom on April 3. Good music has been arranged, and many students are planning to attend. STUDENT ASSOCIATION DANCE April 20 is the date that has been set for the dance to be given by the H. J. C. Students' Association. This dance will be held at the "End of Main" dance hall. This is the third annual dance of the association. TO ENTERTAIN GRADS All graduates of Houston's senior high schools will be invited to attend the ball to be given in their honor by the Houston Junior College on May 8. This dance will be held at the eoIleg< gymnasium, and an attractive entertainment for the graduates is being prepared by the H. J. C. studer.;.; LITERARY FORUM— (Continued from Page 2) all get the gen'ral drift of the conversation. When Rockefeller fust joined the Church, one of the good Deacons re- tnarkvcr-that'he nee. nickle. Wal, you all know what he is today. If I warn't gettin' kinda old myself, I might figger on becomin' a rich feller some day. I guess I might as well not count on that; wouldn't know what to do with four bits if I had it. Maybe I would chew it in two, testin' it to. see if it was all right. Here's a good one to clip an' stick in yer coat pocket: "This is what I'd like to be: Kind and brave and neighborly, Big of heart and broad of mind, Glad with every joy I find, Friendly as I go my way, Generous-handed, day by day. Keeping, though I rise or fall, The love and good esteem of all." Whoever wrote that must have been a fine pusson. It's about time fer me to close. Hope you're efelin' better by now. So just keep pluggin' away, and you're bound to come out right the top. An' just remember: "It's mighty hard a stone to roll Without the help of an earnes.t soul, But the man who wins Is the one who begins Right now to work for his goaL" That's all for the present. So long! THE COUGAR'S CAVE By James Brough Ye old Cougar is receiving many friendly visitors. Since the warm weather has again descended he has been smelling less fried onions and seeing more pleasant sights. For the moral uplift of our profs, and students here is an incinerating truth from the HERALD, the Arkansas State College newspaper. "Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime And by asking foolish questions Take up recitation time." The HERALD is a spirited sheet and it puts its news forward in an interesting manner. It has a Believe It or Not column that makes it a little hard on some of its students. Here is an extract, "Rat Schnee missed a free dance last week-end." It seems to the Cougar that our friend, "Rat" must be getting careless. The GUSHER at Bender High School, Humble, Texas, is a fine little High School paper with excellent humor and a good general appeal. The Cougar notices in the GUSHER'S exchange column that there has been some trouble with the Jay Dee at Jeff Davis High. Be careful GUSHER, Roy Need- ham came from Humble, you know. A neat newspaper with a focused makeup is the FORTY NINER from Yuba County Junior college. Its contents are interesting and almost all- inclusive. A paragraph quotation will give an example. "A man recently sued New York university, claiming that smoke from the university chimneys turned his white poodle dog black in five minutes. The editor of THE NEW YORKER went him one better in claiming that smoke in the same district turned his cream of wheat to grape nuts in four minutes." The Cougar commented on LONE STAR LUTHERAN last week. In the current issue of this paper we find an excellent "snap exam" suggested. Here are a few of the questions. Mr. Minor might try them on some of his brighter students. "What kind of wood is used in making mahogony pianos?'' "Why are green blackberries red?" "What nationality of people belong to the Hebrew church?" "When was the war of 1812?" "Of what is a brick building made?" O-o-h! Mr. Kerbo, for an exam like this. QUIZ BONERS Keats is a poet who wrote on a greasy urn. Name three tragedies by Shakespeare. Mcbeth, King Lear, and Twelve Nights in a Bar Room. When Adam Bede was an old man he entered a convent and became the father of English Literature. A poetic license is a license you get from the Post Office to keep poets. You get one also if you want to keep a dog. It costs two dollars and you call it a dog license. In what order do the Gospels come? One after the other. hat HECTIC JOURNALISM The reporter came idly into the office. "Well," said the editor, did our eminent statesmen have say?" "Nothing." "Well, keep it down to a column." "Didn't I see you eating peas with a ladle last night?" "That wasn't no ladle; that was my knife." HIS BIG MOMENT- (Continued from Page 2) that they had not been in front when the half ended. In the dressing room the coach bellered ano" cussed and made nasty cracks about how the team had played during the first half. Guggles was aroused to a high state of enthusiasm and hoped that the coach would send him in, but when the game was renewed Guggles was still on the bench. The game was almost over now and still he sat on the bench, sad eyed and his shoulders slumped down. Surely the coach would send him in, as Snookums was at last in the lead and the game was almost sewed up. Finally the coach looked at Guggles and the boy snapped erect. He motioned for our hero to come over to his bench. "Guggles, I want you to go—" he began but he was halted by the light in the youth's eyes. "Moonstone, I want you to go out there and take Jackson's place," said the coach in a very queer and forced Guggles ran out on the court and took Jackson's place, thereby playing enough in a major game to at last win his coveted letter. His main ambition had been fulfilled at last. The next morning at breakfast Coach Wilson was talking to his wife about the game last night. "You know that I just could not send that boy down to the dressing room to get my pipe. I started to, but when I saw that look in his eyes, I had to send him in the game." The end. Wife (to husband in bath tub): "Henry, don't start on that song. You know we haven't much soap left" "How old are you, Mary?" "Fifteen." "A girl of fifteen should tell her mother everything." "I know it. But mother is so innocent, really I haven't the heart."
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