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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 002. March 20, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/178.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 20, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/178

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 002, March 20, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/178.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 9, March 20, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date March 20, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR The Cougar Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscription, (1.00 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Editor-in-Chief Everett Associate Editor Associate Editor Associate Editor Faculty Advisor verett Kendall Walter Garrett George Perry Margaret Shell . ,F. R. Birney Department Editors Society Maurine Edminster Sports—Men Martin Lowe Humor Jane Witherspoon Activity .Frances Baty Exchange , Rubye Tunnell Feature .Ethel Mercer Literary Forum Reporters Chapell Freeman Pauline Ault Beatrice Hamilton Lois Harrison Montford Inman A. C. Irwin Fay Laurence Ethel Mercer Rubye Tunnell Llewellyn Ross Frances Baty Opal Beane Lucille Cafcalas Evelyn Cochran Welton Cohen Gordon Davis Ruth Dermody Lois Dufl ENROUTE Going through college is more ok less analogious to the process of going through life. And we are not possessed with sufficient boldness to say whether it is better to go through life, or college either, in the manner of an oyster or perhaps in some other way. But we do have our ideas. We believe that a certain amount of awareness to college conditions, an interest in things in general and the ability to respond actively to what one thinks right or wrong, is many times better than being a trained seal and thinking that life is a printed fact and a fact because it is printed. It is not our purpose to create false values. And should we indicate that extra-curricular college life is of more import than the formal element or class room activity we would be doing that. But what we are saying is simply this: a college career like life is not endless, therefore make the most of it. You are embezzeling the time life has allotted to you when you remain inert and refuse to realize any worthwhile experience proffered you by either college or life. SPEEDERS Malcom Campbell is fairly good in his field. But in competition with the curve artists of ihe Houston Junior College we feel that he would simply fail to qualify. The British speed monarch is a sickler for good visibility, track conditions, and what not In fact in the world of dare-devildom his performances are far inferior to those of some of our worthy students. And as this editorial does not set out to attain great length, it will include no accident sl&tistics or phrases couched in the darker shades of crepe. Suffice to say that when Death takes a holiday those holidays must perforce end. And t6r.ce it is he who is a master of cjni elusions, let's not immitate hin, by ending his vacation. I AM THE NEWSPAPER Born of the deep, daily need of a nation, I am the voice of now, the incarnate spirit of the times, monarch of things that are. My "cold type" burns with the fire-blood of human action. I am fed by arteries of wire that girdle the earth. I drink from the cup of every joy and sorrow. I know no death, yet am born again with every morn, with every noon, with every twilight I leap into fresh being with every new world's event. Those who created me cease to be; the brains and heart's blood* that nourish me go the way of human dissolution. Yet I live on and on. I am majestic in my strength, sublime in my power, terrible in my potentialities, yet as democratic as the ragged boy who sells me for a penny. I am the consort of kings, the partner of capital, the brother of toil. The inspiration of the hopeless, the right arm of the needy, the champion of the oppressed, the conscience of the criminal. I am the epitome of the world's comedy and tragedy. My responsibility is infinite. I speak, and the world stops to listen. OUR COUGAR GROWLS It seems that even a nice peaceable kitty will become peeved if it ficiently goaded. Just Talk believes that somebody must have walked The Cougar's paws. Otherwise, how could our Cougar have been growling the other day when our reporter, Genevieve Pledge, Visited him for an interview? Here's how Genevieve explains it: Dear Editor: I dropped in again last night for my customary chat with The Cougar, and believe me, he was belligerent! He met me at the door, mouth foaming and teeth bared. I was tempted to turn and run, but I could see well enough that he had something on his mind, and I knew from the looks of him that it would make a good story. So I gritted my teeth and commandeered my shaking knees long enough to reach a seat. A lack and alas, the lief of a reporter is hard! Well, The Cougar didn't even sit down—much less curl up comfortably he usually does when I visit. He slunk from one side of the room to the other, wiggling the end of his tail like wild animal stalking some prey. Then came the storm! At first I could hardly get what he was saying, he talked so fast, and roared in between words. Finally it dawned on me The Cougar had heard some gossip. Someone has whispered in his ear that his school lacked spirit—my! was he ngry! "And this," he roared, "is the most OB-STRE-PER-OUS part of it; the school has spirit—it just doesn't Everyone leaves it to the other fellow to do the boosting. I am so sick of the word co-operation that I refuse to use it but you get what I me; gave a weak nod of affirmation and rescued my hot from a rather depressed position in the seat of my chair and left. Dear Editor: I may live over it, but I'll never look the same. Personally, I see nothing that will appease our beloved pet but to prove to him that he's right! Best regards, Reporter Pledge. HOW TO USE LIBRARY Have you ever considered studying in our library. Here is an idea or two, on the subject, that Irene Johnson contributes: Do we college students recognize and appreciate the school library and the possibilities it offers us? I am afraid that we do not. The large room with good lighting, the tables, the chairs, and the books all offer a very desirable pis study, but have you noticed the conduct of the majority of the students who use the library? How few use it for study! There are groups who hold lengthy social chats, others who roam from the hall into the library and out again, with no apparent aim in view, but they disturb the students who would like to concentrate on their Just the other day two of our most likeable girls entered the library. They approached one of the social groups. One seated herself upon a corner of one of the tables, opened her compact and, between comments and giggles (which by the way sounded hysterical), re-did her face. The other was chewing gum, and continually popped it so loudly that it could be heard almost the entire length of the room. Did this show disrespect for Mrs. Shearer or for fellow students? I am (Continued on Page 4) A Junior College student who wishes to remain anonymous gave us the fol lowing verse. Each of us could he H. J. C. a great deal if we would adopt these sentiments: H—ere's to the Junior College— O—h, let's work through smiles and tears U—ntil we have it peerless, and S—pread its renown through the years. T—-he name of it should be our pride; O—ur efforts here will its fate decide, N—ot one of us but should say we've J—ust a little loyal pulling U—ntil we've made its fame— N—o less should we expect to do I—n the Junior College .name. 0—n our way then, let us be R—eaching up for H, J. C. C—ome on, you sophs and freshmen, 0—ur school lies in our hands. L—-et's make it bigger and better— L—et it be known through lands. E—ach one of us can do our part, G—ive loyalty and a loving heart E—very day, and make ourselves a OF HOUSTON JUNIOR COLLEGE. GRINS and GROANS Whew! Thank goodness those six eeks exams are finished at last . . . even The Cougar is breathing a sigh of relief. Here's Kenneth Phillips' view of the situation. EXAMS! EXAMS!! When do "sophs" pass up a date To burn the midnight fire? It's when to pass it's rather late, Then comes disaster dire. When do "fish" begin to squirm, And call themselves "Big Hams?" When do leaves begin to turn? The night before EXAMS! —KENNETH PHILLIPS. From one of Texas' own poets, Grace Noll Crowell, we quote this poem: A PRAYER FOR COURAGE God make me brave for life, Oh, braver thp.n this! Let me straighten after pain As a tree straightens after the rain, Shining and lovely again. God make me brave for life, Much braver than this! As the blown grass lifts let me rise From sorrow with quiet eyes Knowing Thy way is wise. God make me brave—Life brings Such blinding things. Help me to keep my sight, Help me to see aright That out of the dark—comes light. I say the word, and the battle flame; the horizon. I counsel peace, and the war-lords obey. I am greater than any individual—more powerful than any public opinion. Rightly directed, I am a creator of confidence, a builder of happiness in living. I am the teacher of patriotism. I am the hands of the clock of time, the clarion voice of Civilization. I am the newspaper. —JOSEPH H. FINN. Fil-o-Sophie By KENNETH PHILLIPS Do ya ever feel kinda blue? Well, somethin's wrong with ya if ya don't. Just wonderin' if you folks needed any bolsterin' or boostin' or whatever the word is, Phil decided to let ya in on a few of his fillosofies. He hasn't got no degree from a universalty yet, but he's seen petty nigh all a pusson needs to see. Phil'e be. Here's a little verse that sorter gets under yer skin—makes yo wonder if you 11 ever be liek it says: "The wounds I might have healed! The human sorrow and smart! And yet it never was in my soul To play so ill a part; But evil is wrought by want of thought As well as want of heart!" Perty good, isn't it? Reminds me of a htle motto I heard once: "Oh, loyal to the royal in thyself!" I guess everybody hez somethin' royal about him. Shakespeare wrote a line or two on that order. If I can think it up, I'll pass it on. Oh, yes, it ran somethin' like this: "This above all: as the night the day, Thou can'st hot then be false to any man." William was a reg'lar feller. You all didn't know I was such a hound fer liter'ture, did ya? My Sunday Schoo) teacher told me another verse one time.. You folks might not go to church an' prayer meetin', but this might help ya', anyway: "There's so much good in the worst of us, And so much bad in the best of us, That it does not behoove any of us To criticize the rest of us." I don't know what "behoove" means, n' I don't suppose you do, but we kin (Continued on Page 3) Bill Smith: You know, I got a bright idea out of a corner of my brain today. John Hill: Huh! Must have been a "stow-a-way." Little Girl: Aunty, why do you put powder on your face? Aunt: To make me pretty. Little Girl: Then, why doesn't it? A GOAT GETTER He: Do you pet? She: Sure—animals. He: Go ahead; I'll be the goat Harold Steele calls his fraternity pin "the soldier" because it has been on so many fronts. Fairfax Moody: What ya wating for? Julia Green: A joke. Fairfax: Send him my love. Fond Father: Your studies are suf-" fering. Do you need a coach? Marion Moore: No, dad, a roadster'll do. Fresh: I'm in a terrible fix and have no idea where to get money from. Soph: Good, I was afraid you thought you could get some from me. Mr. Birney: This is the plot of my Story. A midnight scene. Two burglars creep stealthily toward the house. They climb a wall, force open a window and enter the room. The clock strikes one. Gladys Jacobs (breathlessly): Which He wandered into the tennis club tournament and sat down on a bench. Whose game?" he inquired. "I am," murmured the flapper sitting next to him. Joe Ed Winfree; "My good man, you had better take the street car home. Lefty Morris: "Sh'no use. Mother wouldn't let me keep it in the house." Visitor in Lnuchroom (suspiciously): "How is the hash made here?" Attendant: "Made, sir? Hash ain't made—it accumulates." "Not many fellows can do this," said the magician (Herbert Sawyer) as he turned his Ford into a lamp post. Ora D. Brown (who has cornered ? burglar in his living room): "Hands up or I will shoot." Quick-Witted Burglar: "Five for de gat." O. D. B.: "Sold." Kenneth Phillips: "That woman in the box hasn't taken her eyes off me for an hour." Milton Moffitt: "How do you know?" "I'd prefer being a chauffeur to being a jockey," said Albert Kindel, "for a jockey sees only the horse's neck while the chauffeur sees everybody neck." Gordon Davis: "How quickly can you stop your car?" Mac Dougherty: "It all depends on the size of the pedestrian—a big one s me right away, but if he's undersized it slows me down gradually." John Reagan: "That garage man says e're carrying entirely too heavy a Nora Louise Calhoun: "Couldn't you throw out the clutch, dear?" Fred Stark: "Yeah? Thats' where I clean the paint off my brushes." Absent-minded College Professor (after a date): "We'll go on from here next time." Carlton Moore: "What's on the radio?" Marian Moore: "Oh, just a little dust." Old Gentleman (in crowded street car): "Has anyone here lost a roll of bills with an elastic band around Chorus from a Dozen Car Riders: "Yes, I have." Old Gentleman (calmly): "Well, I just found the elastic." CAMPAIGN NOTE "Beatrice," said Mrs. B. to her daughter, "if Harold asks you to be his wife, tell him to speak to me." Beatrice nodded and then said: "And, if he doesn't ask me, mother?" "In that case," said her mother, "tell him I want to speak to him." OUT-O-LUCK A man pinned under his car after an auto accident was being questioned by policeman. "Married?" "No," he replied, "this is the worst fix I've ever been in." Fond Uncle: "You boys of today want too much money. Do you know what I was getting when I married your aunt?" Nephew: "No, and I'll bet you didn't." HIS BIG MOMENT By ABBY GABDAB Snookums University was in a high ' state of frenzy. The blue and gold was behind ofr the first time in a basketball game this year. The maroon and white of Whoopumup College were in the lead and almost half of the game was ov^r. On the substitutes bench slumped down in despair was "Guggles" Moonstone. He was one of the subs and there was a long story about this youuvthat would clutch at the heart srings of a man (or woman, too). When he had first come to Snookums he was a lad who neevr had a worry but since then his marrh/ brow was continually in a frown as he sat alone thinking. Many people and even his class mates wondered as to what was wrong with him as an explanation to them and my dear readers I will telj you the sad story that wrecked "Guggles" poor heart. one of the few boys that had made good on the freshman basketball squad and received their letter. Ah, he was sweet and agile center if there ever was one. Then came his sophomore year and trouble began to pursue him. He was confident that he would win his first varsity letter but it was the same old story, there were too many that were better than he, and he was destined to be a lowly Such was the case in his second year and time passed and then came his junior year. It seemed as though he would, after so long a time, finally have his desire at last fulfilled but Sp,ke-Eye Jackson proved that he was more capable than poor Guggles and back to the subs was again the cry for our hero. he was in his senior year and still he was one of the poor eads that warmed the bench. His poor heart was torn to smithereens bits by bits. Atfer bemg out ofr the squad for three Harvey Richards: this? It is superb, expression." "Ah, and what is What soul. What years he s going to graduate without 1 his one big moment, having lettered i basketball. From the start it was a known fact that the championship of the Crazy Nme conference would be between bnookum and he old rival, Whoopumup College. Neither team had lost a game, and now the story is brought up to the present time. Guggles was sitting on the bench chewing his finger nails off one by one Would the half never end? It seemed as though it would not to our hero Finally his wish was gratified and the shot was fired ending the half. Snook- team left the floor weary and tired. It was the first time this season (Continued on Page 3)
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