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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 001. March 20, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2018. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/177.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(March 20, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 001. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/177

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931 - File 001, March 20, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2018, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/181/show/177.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 9, March 20, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 9, March 20, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date March 20, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder; however, for this item, either (a) no rights-holder(s) have been identified or (b) one or more rights-holder(s) have been identified but none have been located. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript On April 3 THE COUGAR Published by the Journalism Students of the Houston Junior College Sophomore Dance On April 3 "HOL'STON. TEXAS. FRIDAY. MARCH 20. 19151 LOCAL EDUCATOR INTERVIEWED BY H. J. C. REPORTER Assistant Superintendent Gives His Views Concerning Education PROVE PRACTICAL MERIT Describes Commercial Value of This Training to Students Values in education are difficult to determine. If education were a material thing, visible, measurable, and definitely determinable, it would not be difficult to calculate its worth. But since the amount gained through the various types of educational training differs with each type of training offered and with the individual trained, the question of value becomes very complex and difficult to determine, according to G. T. Cunningham, assistant superintendent of Houston schools. Said Mr. Cunningham: "Measured on a monetary basis in this commercial era education is invaluable. Employers are convinced of the fact that the person who has attended college makes a better employe and will advance faster and to a greater extent than will one who has received less training along educational lines. Oother things being equal, when two applicants appear before an employer, the one having the greater amount of formal educational training is selected. "At first glance it would seem that the army would be the least interested, of all organizations, in college training for prospective aviators It is true that until recently such requirements were not high in this field, however, today the applicant for an appointment to an army primary training field for aviators must prove that he has successfully completed a minimum of two years of college work, or that he has had educational training of equivalent, "Many persons today wish to measure all things by the dollar and cents rule. While education does not adapt itself to such a scale, it is nevertheless, a fact that in any line of industry, those men and women who have the best equipment for their work are the best paid. Outstanding individuals have been highly successful with very little so-called formal education. Yet for one such person who succeeded without academic training, hundreds have been able to add to their yearly salaries because of their advanced educational equipment, which enables them to attain higher positions in all) lines of business and industry. History is filled with the men and women who have achieved great heights. Many of them lacked riches, but most of them were trained intellectually. Culture and education go hand in hand. For this reason, most leaders of men who have gone down in history have acquired, in one way or another, a superior mental training. "Today we place the names of such men as Woodrow Wilson, Pasteur, Richard E. Byrd, Calvin Coolidge, and Oliver Wen del Holmes on the pinnacles of the heights of fame. Comparatively few individuals have achieved such fame as these five. Yet they were not 'born to the purple.' Whatever success they have attained has been the direct result o! their own abilities. "Education is democratic. No rank or title is necessary as a prerequisite to becoming an educated person. Whatever ambition the individual may have can be realized through the acquisition of an educational training and through persistent effort. "Education today, as never before, trains every child for life. It does not set the school child aside, apart from the rush and turmoil of life, rather, it guides and directs the education of that child giving him only such knowledge as will better prepare him for the part he is to play in the business and professional world" STUDENTS SEE DISPLAY OF ORIENTAL RELIC IN JOURNALISM CLASSES Mind pictures of other days and other customs are created by the ancient go Id-embroidered Persian robe owned by Prince Darab Mirza Kadjar who allowed the garment to be exhibited before the journalism class at H. J. C. on Friday, Feburary 27. Weighing five pounds and nine ounces, and made of the finest materials, this ancient garment brings a strange note of contrast to present day matter-of-fact atmosphere. Looking at it, one's mind involuntarily wanders far in the past amid scenes of oriental splendor. There come visions of moonlit Persian gardens, soft eastern music, Persian ladies of strange exotic beauty, dark intrigue, and sudden death. Two of the owners of the robe were assassinated. One wonders if the bright scarlet of the cloth has been mingled with the crimson of freshly shed blood. This regal garment was made in 1794, and it was first worn by Agha Mohammed, who that year conquered Persia. Because of his manner of handling the affairs of his new kingdom, Agha became known far and wide as "Agha the Cruel." No doubt many a trembling wretch now wandering afar in some oriental heaven—remembers thid robe, worn by the monarch, as his last earthly scene before being beheaded. In 1797 Agha the Cruel succumbed to his own evil designs and was assassinated. The throne then descended to his nephew, Fath Ali Shah, who founded the adjar Dynasty which endured until 1929 when it was overthrown by revolution. From the early owners the robe has descended directly to the present owner, Prince Darab Mirza Kadjar, who is an oil man. At the time of the Persian revolution the prince was at school at St. Cyr, France, and the robe was in the hands of his uncle, Ahmed. After the revolution Ahmed fled to Paris, where he died insane. Most of the time since 1849 the robe has been in the state museum at Teheran, Persia. It was recently sold for $500. MISS GUNN HEADS HONORARY SOCIETY Considerable interest is being shown in the newly organized honorary society at H. J. C. This society is composed of students who have made an average grade of B. So far about 20 students have qualified for membership. At a recent meeting of the society Miss Earlene Gunn was elected president. Other officers are to be selected at a meeting to be held at Mrs. Brenders' office on March 27 at 7 p.m. All qualifying students are requested to be present at that time as pins are then to be selected and a nania for the - organization will be chosen. Football Lettermen To Receive Sweaters Football lettermen of Houston Junior College will receive sweaters from the proceeds of a dance to be given by the school, April 20. This dance will also serve to pay several bills that the freshman class owe at the present time. Pete Garrison, president of the Student Council, urged all to come to the dance and make it a big success. He stated that members of the Federated Clubs of Houston will turn out in large numbers for this dance and have pledg-> ed their support. They will also aid the college by selling tickets for this dance. CUTS ENLIVEN COUGAR Through the co-operation of the Texas Engraving Company the Cougar is enabled to enliven its columns with cuts. The art work for these cartoons and feature column cuts was done by Miss Vandalia Mae Necco, who was a student at H. J. C. last semester. MAN LONGS FOR STABILITY SAYS H J. C. SPEAKER Dr. E. P. West Speaks of Reasons For Decay of Former Nations WARNS AGAINST DANGER Speaker Advises Students to Build Lives On Sure Foundations Mankind has always longed for a state of harmony that will endure, according ot Rev. E. P. West, pastor of the Second Baptist Church, who addressed the student body at the regular assembly meeting Wednesday. Mr. West was introduced by Professor Miller who told of the speaker's work among the young people of the In his opening remarks Mr. West said that he is interested in the Junior College and considered it a privilege to be present and address the students. He then proceeded to tell of the many former nations and institutions that have passed away, and he brought up the question as to whether our nation is showing the same signs of decay that were evident before the fall of Rome. "Men have always longed for the "city that hath foundations," something that will last. Examples of this yearning are Thomas Moore's Eutopia, Augustine's City of God, and Milton's Paradise Regained," said the speaker. "Life to be on a firm foundation must have seven pillars," he continued. "These are stability, the dignity of labor, purity in society, exaltation of womanhood, education, freedom in religious worship, and harmonious home life." Mr. West then pointed out the dangerous things to society which are: Concentration of wealth among a few, worship of wealth, corruption of wealth, extravagance of wealth, and ignorance of the common people; while the things that have survived all evil influences are the state, religion, the Sabbath Day, the right of owning personal property, and the family. LIBRARIAN HURT IN CAR ACCIDENT Mrs. Hannah Shearer, well known librarian at Houston Junior College, was injured iast Thursday evening when she was struck by a Ford truck while walking across a street intersection, near ihe school building. She was knocked down and severely bruised. At first complications were feared, but later reports are that Mrs. Shearer is recovering, and will soon be able to resume her work at the library- COLLEGE 'PHONE TELLS VERY SAD TALE OF USE * * * * BY LOCAL STUDENTS (Editor's Note: The following graphic pictorial of the most intimate experiences of the college telephone was received, much to our surprise, only five minutes before The Cougar went to press, therefore we publish it without comment.) Sometimes I wish I had never been invented at all; for after all, I am only a tool—a mistreated instrument and a plaything of mens' vanity. My only enjoyment in life is that little rest I get on Saturdays and Sundays—but, oh my, how I earn that rest. How I pay for every bit of it from seven to seven-thirty on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. That awful half hour. The mere thought of it makes me shudder so that my wary bell tinkles without the usual stimulus. Sometimes I think that it will be impossible to emerge from that hectic thirty-minute period without having a melted mouthpiece; or without having had a cruel amputation of the hook performed by some enraged pre-med student all because a sweet voice at the other end of the wire said something about being dated up. And what language those boys from the Dental College can use. One would think that it is my fault because nobody answers at the other end. I wish I worked at a beauty parlor or a florist shop; then life would be worth living. And out of all the places in Houston that they might have put me, they picked out Junior College. Were there only some way I could arrange a transfer; but I suppose there isn't. Or if Junior College would only hurry up and get a permanent building, but— my gosh, there's that seven o'clock class bell. THE TELEPHONE. FORD ROADSTER STOLEN. Automobile thieves heve been active in the vicinity of the Junior College. At the assembly Wednesday evening Mr. Henderson asked all students to watch for the number "F16278" which was on a Ford roadster that was recently stolen from a student who had parked it near the college building. BASEBALL PRACTICE BEGINS The smack of wood against horse- hide can be heard any morning at West End ball park. Coach French has a likely squad out for the Cougar nine. Any one who wishes to try out may report at the park any morning at 10 o'clock. sort of imagination that brings Is one that sees a distant summit, a general route to it, and just where to put the feet for tho next ten steps. CLASSICAL MUSIC ASSEMBLY FEATURE Miss Genevieve Pledge, student violin artist at Houston Junior College, enter-- tained the student body at its weekly assembly Wednesday at 7:30 p|m. "I can just say that it is not jazz. You must judge for yourselves," was al) the introduction Miss Pledge gave to her selections. Miss Vivian Kenney was at the piano. If the hearty applause could be taken for the judgment of the audience, Miss Pledge chose wisely and played well, In response to the demand for an encore. "The World Is Waiting for the Sunrise" was rendered. N. K. Dupre, assistant director of the college, issued an appeal for aid in making the library a quiet room suitable for research and study. Immediately following the adjournment of assembly, a call meeting of the sophomore class was held in the auditorium. STUDENTS PRESENT PLAY AT RICHMOND THURSDAY "Nothing But the Truth," the comedy success presented at H. J. C. by the student players, was presented Thursday ai Richmond under the auspices of (lie Richmond public schools. The members of the cast were accompanied to Richmond by Miss Neil- wyn Turner, Willard Nesmith, and Jack Thurman. Miss Turner played during the entertainment MISS FOWLER ILL Miss Sammie Lane Fowler is reported to be ill in a hospital at Cameron, Texas. Miss Fowler attended H. J. C. last semester, but was obliged to withdraw from the school because of illness. Things are never as eem, which means that s happy or as unhappy bad FAMOUS POET BRINGS JOY TO STUDENT BODY Judd Mortimer Lewis Reads His Own Poems at Assembly TELLS OF~ADVENTURES Gives "The Old Wash Place," A Song of Mother Love and Heroism. Judd Moritmer Lewis, Houston's own poet, spoke before an interested audience of students and patrons of the college in the auditorium Wednesday night, February 25. "Uncle Judd," as he is familiarly known, recited many of his poems, the themes of which were love, home life, and children. Humor also played an important part in his recitations, and he had the audience constantly in an uproar. The titles of some of his poems are, A Texas Boy, Love, Little Children' and The Old Wash Place. He also recounted many incidents of his travels which were especially interesting. Round after round of applause greeted each of his offerings and the regular assembly period was allowed to run 30 minutes over time for the popular "Uncle Judd" is nationally famous. His poems with their genial and inspiring atmosphere have cheered the hearts of multitudes. The sacrifices and heroism of a typical mother are poignantly pictured in the famous potm The OJd Wash Place. The students were interested to know that Mr. Lewis wrote this jwem in a little more than an hour as a result of numerous requests for such a composition. Mr. Lewis was presented by Mr. Harris who lauded the poet in his introductory speech. LEWIS ENJOYS VISIT That Mr. Lewis enjoyed his visit to H. J. S. is indicated by the following taken from his column. Platinum Poitns, in the Houston Post-Dispatch; Recently I visited the Junior College, which functions nights at the San Jacinto High School, and learned much which I had not known about this educational institution, about its faculty and the student body made up of eighj hundred individuals on their way to making educated and useful citizens of themselves. Houston knows very little about the activities, the aims and accomplishments of Junior College, and it would be well for our citizens to avail themselves of the opoprtunity to attend chapel there on Wednesday evenings from seven-thirty to eight o'clock. Such a visit furnishes an experience with 2 thrill to it. H. 3, C. WILL DEBATE WESTMINSTER APRIL 10 "Resolved, That The Nations of the World Should Adopt Free Trade," the first debate subject for the T. F. C. P. S. meet of which H. J. C. is a member for the first time in its history, is scheduled for April 10, between H. J. C. and Westminster Junior College at Houston. April 24 marks the final debates to be held at Temple Junior College at Bryan. These debates will determine the state champions. Oratorial contest for both boys and girls will be held April 3 at Westminster Junior College at Tehuacana. One-act plays are scheduled for the latter part of April at Hillsboro. Dates for two special debates will be announced later by Coach Harris between H. . C. and Temple Junior College at Bryan and H. J. C. and South Park Junior of Beaumont at Houston. Your sole contribution to the sum of things is yourself. I see only one means of knowing how far I can go: that is by going.—Bergson.
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