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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931 - File 002. May 6, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/176/show/173.

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(May 6, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/176/show/173

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931 - File 002, May 6, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/176/show/173.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 4, No. 11, May 6, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. IV, No. 11, May 6, 1931
Contributor
  • Kendall, Everett
Date May 6, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript THE COUGAR The Cougar Of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscription, $1.00 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Editor-in-Chief Everett Kendall Associate Editor Walter Garrett Associate Editor Kenneth Phillips Associate Editor Margaret Shell Associate Editor _ ..Rubye Tunnell Faculty Advisor F. R. Birney Department Editors Literary Genevieve Pledge Society Maurine Edminster Sports—Men Milton Moffitt Humor Jane Witherspoon Activity Frances Baty Exchange Llewelyn Ross Feature Ethel Mercer Reporters Cbapell Freeman Pauline Ault Beatrice Hamilton Frances Baty Lois Harrison Opal Beane Montford Inman Lucille Cafcalas A. C. Irwin Evelyn Cochran Fay Laurence Welton Cohen Ethel Mercer Gordon Davis Rubye Tunnell Ruth Dermody Llewellyn Ross Lois Duff AN APPRECIATION Before it is too late The Cougar wishes to express appreciation for all the H. J. C. athletes who have struggled to bring the school recognition in this phase of collegiate life. During the past year our school has had few victories and made few startling records; but its teams have won the admiration of all their opponents by their good sportsmanship. All through the year a few students have done their best in this field of Work for the honor of the school. Due to the fact that many of our students work during the daylight hours the games have not been well attended. But this fact did not dampen the wonderful school spirit of our athletes. There is talk of letters for the boys who have done their best against odds in athletics. At any rate we say, "Hats off to Coach French and his boys who have played the game.' Just Talk BOOK ROOM TECHNIQUE How many H. J. C. students know the method by which they are enabled to purchase their textbooks at a very nominal cost? Probably about one in fifty. They all know that Proefssor A. L. Kerbow and his wife, and Bursar H. W. South, occupy a den on the second floor several hours each day. Most of them have visited the room to pay tuition fees, or to buy books. But few have learned any more. They are annoyed by delays when the orders are not shipped promptly form the publishing companies. Or perhaps the publishers ship the books promptly on receipt of the orders; yet the students can not realize that the book room is not at fault. Occasionally one bears a complaint about "the high prices of books." Only the select few know that our Junior College book room sells textbooks on aji average of from 10 to 20 per cent cheaper than the average book store. Mr. Kerbow orders books at the- publisher's wholesale price. He sells them at a very small margin of profit. This "margin" is fictitious, for the book room incurs losses all its own. Most notable among these losses is the purchase of second-hand books from students, only to discover later that they are out of date. Then, of course, Mr. and Mrs. Kerbow must b- paid for their services. That is the "Book Room Technique." A few more weeks and then the long vacation. Let's all pull together to make a fine windup for the year's work . Smiles and a glad hand for your fellow-students! That' s the way to make school life enjoyable and our school a "regular" institution. Nora L. Calhoun: T think it's so silly to throw kisses. Don't you? Johnny Reagan: "Rather. I prefer to deliver mine in person. BRAVE GIRL! Can you picture a cute li'l co-ed going right up to a wild animal, looking him in the eye, and getting an interview from him, so's to write a "piece for the paper?" Well, sir, that's just what Genevieve Pledge has done, not once but twice. And the things that wild animal does tell Genevieve, tsk, tsk: Dear Editor: I was wary about visiting The Cougar this week, as I didn't think he could have cooled off in this short time, but I mustered enough courage for facing him anyway, and as usual, a big surprise! He seemed to be expecting me, but couldn't stop grin- :g long enough to greet me, so I took a lot for granted and settled down to hear his story. You must be wondering what the old chap was so tickled over—well, so was I. Finally, between giggles, it came out. He had just read the last edition of his namesake and just couldn't suppress his delight! "That was the best we've had yet," he declared, and gave a roar of laughter. "B-but I was just wondering—" here he exploded again and laughed until tears railed down his face and dripped off his whiskers," wondering where Boyd Pegory would place Mr. South on that faculty team! Seems to me he would make an awfully good guard; they couldn't get over him, and by the time they got around him the ball would be in the basket! Seems real unfair to have left him out just because he doesn't teach. He's sure a great fellow." The Cougar seemed pretty hysterical by that time , so I thought I'd better leave him; but just as I got to the door he controlled himself long enough to call good-bye. And then he added, "By the way, if you see George Perry, tell the old scoundrel that he sure did a good job on that complainer." The last I heard, the Cougar was laughing. Believe me, dear Editor, it's worth the work to get anyone in that humor. Best regards, Reporter Pledge. ENJOYS WISE CRACKS Assembly means much to L. C. Marshall, according to the following contribution from him: "The well known little utterance which closely resembles a duck call is due those comics who are so witty that they are unable to keep their clever remarks to themselves at the assembly periods. Of course, almost everyone realizes that this group is just too funny for words, but at the same time we believe that the student body does not appreciate the value of this bunch of wise-acres. Do they not create laughter among thier cronies when the program becomes dull? Do they not amuse those who are seated about them with their clever wise cracks? Yes! Again we say these clowns are invaluable at our school. But the truth of the matter is that these are two well developed pains in the neck at each assembly and these wcruld-be comics are both of them!" Literary Forum OLD FABLE— (Continued from Page 1) vas homeless, penniless, and brok- in both body and mind. In his former back yard there were diamonds by the hundreds, but alas, he had left to search for them elsewhere. Therefore," said the speaker in his closing statement, "whatever you do, do it your best and I am surp that you too will find a diamond in your own back yard." Preceding the talk several announcements were given the student body by members of the faculty. HE'D DIE LAUGHING Junior College students, with springtime and June coming on, and all that, have turned poets. Here's a sample by that Judd Mortimer Lewis fiend, "G. Pledge." An optimist, cheerful and true, Lost his sweetheart—she died with the flue; But the sadly bereaved, laughing right up his sleeve, Said, "I'll find me another or tue." MOTHER LOVE This is a neat bit of sentiment from Philip Allen, a budding young J. C. A mother's love is like a ship That bucks the strongest storm, And makes us all feel quite as safe As God's protecting arm. This love will follow us through hell Or heaven, if it be, For mother's arms will always be A sweet security. And when the world has cast you out, And left you all alone, Then mother's love is with you still And wants you back at home. A MESSAGE OF SPRING We told you so! Here's a "Message of Spring" from Kenneth Phillips. Glad to hear from our old philosopher: Sweet, gentle, restful spring! Season of awakened hearts! A breath of Heaven thou dost fling Over Nature's utmost parts. Bringing on thy warm caress, Thou hast repulsed the freezing blast. Clothing all in lightsome dress, You breathe to all that Winter's Stirring every plant and seed, To life anew, you blossom forth In freshest green and brightest deed, In budding leaf and living earth. . Amazing how life's faintest breath Can quicken at thy soft behest! Awake from Winter's tomb of death Ye mighty hosts, and join the blest! That's pretty, isn't it? Keep it up, Kenneth. Another jingle from Genevieve. She's quite light-minded this time, eh? PITY THE PROFS The term-is done, Exams will come, Our books are getting busy. The students run, 'Tis teacher's fun To se them getting dizzy. But bide your time, Oh soph and slime, You, bright, or dumb or lazy. Revenge, in time, Is yours and mine- When grading makes them hazy! —G. Pledge. Here's a gem of real poetry by L. Shepperd: PRESAGE A silver seagull poised above The foaming white-caps high; A vivid rainbow sharply etched Against the dulling sky. A shower of blossoms, feathery-white, Flung by some dancing tree Not yet in leaf—through such as these I glimpse Eternity. Stirring and Romantic Book Presented Library "Jeb Stuart," the latest book by Captain W. Thomason has been presented to the H. J. C. by the author's sister, by Miss Sue Thomason. The book is a stirring and romantic biography of the "Sword of the South," full of the drama of Jeb Stuart's life and such exploits as his "ride around McClellan." Not the least interesting feature of the book is a series of sketches with which Captain Thomason has illustrated it. The library also has "Red Pants," and "Fix Bayonets," by Captain Thomason. GRINS and GROANS Mr. Anderson (Y.M.CA. director): Now, Paul, don't tell anybody what your salary is, or you'll lose your job. Paul Gilder: Don't worry, I'm just as much ashamed of it as you are. Dumbell: See that fellow over there? He's the smartest man in Junior College." Cuckoo: Who, him? Why, he's halfwitted. Dumbell: Well? Cougar Editor: "Your poem is so good, I think we'll put it in a box. Reporter (eagerly): You mean a box on the front page? Ed: No! I mean a box on the floor. Mr. Bishkin: Fred, can you tell me what sodium stearate is?" Fred Collins: "No sir. It might be soap, for all I know. Genevieve Pledge: At last I've attained success! Mr. Birney: Did some magazine buy one of your poems? Genevieve: Sure! The Houston Gargoyle is going to use it in an advertising campaign. Mr. Harris: Under what conditions did Wordsworth write his poem about the daffodils? Harold Steele: Oh, I guess he had the spring fever. We wish Kenneth Phillips would go on a Crisco diet—because it is short- Did you hear about the two Junior College boys who got hurt at the football game when someone yelled, "Get that quarter back." We wonder why Walter Garrett doesn't come out from behind that brush; we'd like to see his face. Geo. Perry: This vanishing cream is a fake. Druggist: How come? Geo. Perry: I've used it on my feet every night for two weeks and they are as large as they ever were. Teacher: Tommy, tell the class something about Lindbergh's great feat. Tommy: I never saw them, but I can tell them about Charlie Chaplin's. "Robert," said the teacher, to drive home the lesson which was on charity and kindness, "if I saw a man beating a donkey and stopped him from doing so, what virtue would I be showing?" "Brotherly love," said Bobby promptly. A car parked on a lonely road is only two generations removed from the Id parlor sofa. Dresses that button up the back are caid to be returning to fashion and it is expected that husbandfe will be in demand once again. From a Junior College composition book: On A Rainy Day "It began to rain cats and dogs and soon the road was full of poodles.'' No Wonder—Remember Nero? 'When in Rome did you do as the Romans do?" "No—my wife was with me." Ignorance Is Bliss John: I hear you're going to divorce your husband. Joan: Why, how silly, I hardly know him. Mr. Birney: I'd like a nice pair of oxfords. Shoe Clerk: For an oak desk or ahogany? Homer Lowe: How do they judge beauty contest in Hawaii? M. D. Crane: They take a straw I wish I was as religious as Abie. And vy? He clasps his hands so tight in prayer, he can't get them open ven der collection box comes around." 'Red' Delerey: The doctor says I can't play golf. "What-a-man" Green: Didn't you Hugo Leuder: Why are you painting your car black? John Durrenberger: In memory of my dead battery and missing spark. "Don't you know the difference between a horse and a donkey?" "Well, I'd never mistake you for a horse." Poor Pa The minister called at the Jones house on Sunday afternoon and little Willie answered the door. "Pa ain't home," he announced, "He's gone over to the Country Club." The minister's brow darkened and Willie hastened to explain. "Oh, he ain't gonna play any golf. He just went over for a few highballs and a little stud poker." In the Cafeteria Elden Daunoy: "There's a piece of rubber tire in my hash." Waitress: "No doubt, the motor is displacing the horse everywhere." Pity the Fox It seems that Louise Morgan was visiting in Alaska and chanced to visit a fox farm. After admiring a beautiful silver specimen, she is reported to have asked her guide, "Just how many times can the fox be skinned for its fur?" "Three times, Madam," replied the guide gravely, "Any more than that would spoil his temper." POETS— (Continued from Page 1) a quivering sensation when he wrote: "But look, the morn, in russet mantle clad, Walks o'er the dew of yon high eastern hill!" We see the beauty of that r after it has been called to our attention, yet we cannot paint a similar picture of our own accord. Thus we are—dead to the life about us. There'are incidents, it is true, that arouse our feelings, but those incidents are comparatively few. Perhaps some day we shall wake to find "tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything." Until then, we are blind. RECEPTION— (Continued from Page 1) Bender, the dean of women, "have been such successes that it will be necessary this year to take steps to eliminate others than high school seniors and Houston Junior College students from the hall to prevent it from being crowded. We are looking forward to an even larger attendance this year." The reception is to be followed by a one-act play ia the auditorium. The play, "The Immigrant," was written by Mrs. T. H. Mattingly, a Houston Junior College student. The east of characters follows: Mrs. Templeton Jane Witherspoon, Mr. Templeton C. G. Hall Son of Mrs. Templeton Jack Thurman Madame Blanche. Madga Shole Kathleen Colleenan .— _ Nora Louise Calhoun ORATORS— (Continued from Page 1) " C. made a trip to Houston Wednesday, April 15. John Dubois and Granville Walker met Phil Hamberger and Gordon Jones in the music room at 5:30 p.m. Ida Marie Roberson and Aline Fife debated Adele Drenkle and Lucille Cafcalas before the entire student body in a general assembly feature. Both visiting teams won in their respective contests, neither of which was a scheduled meet of the T. J. C. P. S. A. All three debates, including one with Westminster and two with South Park, were on the question, "Resolved, That the Nations of the World Should Adopt a Policy of Free Trade."
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