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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 3, December 23, 1931
File 002
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 3, December 23, 1931 - File 002. December 23, 1931. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 20, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/171/show/168.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(December 23, 1931). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 3, December 23, 1931 - File 002. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/171/show/168

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 3, December 23, 1931 - File 002, December 23, 1931, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 20, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/171/show/168.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 3, December 23, 1931
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 3, December 23, 1931
Contributor
  • Conroe, Oscar
Date December 23, 1931
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript TWO THE COUGAR^ THE COUGAR Of The Houston Junior College Houston, Texas Established 1928 Published semi-monthly during the college year. Subscriptions, $1 per year. Single copies, 10 cents. EDITORIAL BOARD Editor-in-Chief Oscar Gonroe Managing Editor A. Marks Assistant Editors . Lucy Tailey, Betty Covington Faculty Advisor.. Fred R. Birney Department Editors Sports Editor V. F. (Rip) Harrison Feature Editor L. Ray Pell Literary Editor James Julian Humor Editor Ruth Depperman Reporters Hairy Phillips, Gladys Jacobs, Mary Jane Fly, James Page, Eugene Heard, Margaret Macey, L. P. Marshall, Eugene Heard, Wenona Phelps, Helen Higgins, Wilma Lindsay, Flossie White, Gladys Howard, Walter Garrett. EXCHANGE By James L. Julian Class Distinction Interest in class distinction seems to be dwindling. Is it that the sophomores have finally decided that the freshman group is larger and more distinguished than they are, or to what do we owe the slack? The contents of a recent letter from Jimmie Brough, who is now attending college in Fort Collins, Colo., might serve to remind them—I mean the mighty sophs—that the lowly frosh are still classed as "insigs" in Colorado. Jimmie tells us that the sophomores at Fort Collins enforce the freshman rules. The penalty for any frosh who disobeys the rules is a "tubbing." After assembly each Monday afternoon they read the names of delinquent freshmen, run them through a belt lne, and then duck them. Hope I'm not putting ideas into the already crowded heads of the sophs. According to the letter, Jimmie is having a grand and glorious time. He thinks it's a privilege to live in Colorado, but he says to remind the fellows that it's a pleasure to live in Texas. We agree with you, Jimmie. Our Barney Oldiields According to the law of averages, there should have been several fatal accidents among Junior College speeders. Let us glance for a moment at the facts concerning recklss driving at this institution. Approximatly one-third of the students who are at school come in their automobiles. Out of this number there are numerous ones who take it upon themselves to display their driving ability to their fellow students- These are the ones who drive "hell bound" around the curves the driveways, disregarding other cars and people. There are several possible results of this carelessness. The driver may crash into another car, into one unlucky pedestrian, or into both. He is therefore endangering both life and property when he drives too fast around school. It may seem to the speeder as though his display of speed is entertaining to his associates, but he should realize that it takes no particular talent to drive a car and that his efforts do not bring any admiration whatsoever. The time has come for this speeding to stop. Let every one act as a factor in halting such nonsense. It is your duty to help secure safety around your school. The past week has brought us exchange papers from all corners ot the United Slates. The paper that comes the fartherest is the PACIFIC STAR from St. Benedict, Oregon. A nice paper that handles -the school problems in a straight-frorn- the -shoulder manner. The CAMPUS CUB published here our front yard in contrast to the PACIFIC STAR, is a well-edited and a 11 composed journal. It might be said that it contains lots of local From Amarillo comes the RANGER, published in a convenient size. The size will enable one to read it in a classroom, crowded street car, in a telephone booth or under the bed Darn clever, I'd say. The PILOT from Port Arthur must have several talented columnists on its staff as it always "runs7' several clever columns. From Dallas comes the ACORN, a paper which seems to carry out the school and class spirit. Each of the four classes have a column concerning activities and functions of the respective class. It contains good material, good leads, goods, good cartoons and cuts, in short it is generally good. The COLLEGE STAR from San Marcos is a nifty paper. After reading it one hag the impression that the whole school is just one big family. The front page is very "newsy" and 11 written, but more jokes should carried on the other pages. THE NUTSHELL Remember that knowledge of one's faults is power. —Austin Parker. Love is one of the few diseases of the liver which can not be cured by temperance or an apple a day. —Michael Ar' :n. Many a girl has been rudely awakened by the man of her dreams. 'There are fools who kiss and tell," Wisely has the poet sung; Man may hold all sorts of posts If he'll only hold his tongue. —Kipling. No News Is Bad News Perhaps you are one of the multitude of students who have been anxiously awaiting The Cougar's third appearance. More than likely, you are. Surely you have been wondering the cause of its long delay. If you are, we are more than glad to explain it to you and want you to help us rush up the next issue. The college gives us an appropriation yearly with which to put out a Cougar for you, and we don't have any of the usual financial troubles— but, we do have our troubles. The staff of The Cougar has no front page news. Oodles and oodles of features and short stories and jokes are on hand all the time, but that is not enough to put out a newspaper. What The Cougar needs is news and plenty of !■! We appreciate your interest in send- The secret of success to purpose. 3 constancy -D'Israeli. SEEN AT THE FRESHMAN PROM Never before If you will drink hair restorer, follow every dram with some good standard depilatory as a chaser. —Don Mar qui, The more I learn, the more I am confronted by my damnable ignorance. —Brice O. Taylor. ...Here's to the lying lips we meet, For truthful lips are bores; And lying lips are very sweet When lying close to yours. Basketball Hopes— (Continued from Page 1) be depended on to put a classy team on the floor that will give account of themselves this year. The first day of practice saw the squad get down to real work, with Coach demonstrating and drilling them the rudiments of the game. A good defensive coupled with a fast-breaking passing attack completes the plans of French and from the defensive part of the game have the players seem the most playing. Mixing a fast attack with a tight defense, the first-s I ringers have steadily improved and have all the appearance of a first-class quintet. With a little backing by the student body, this team can be counted on to go places this year. ing us features, jokes and what not, but we want news. The more actual news we get, the oftener we can put out your paper. So if you want it, help us.' Fred Aebi didn't make the football team, but his girl did. "Women are too biased," says Dirk Johnson, "they always say bias this and bias that." Sarah Lucy discovered one of the obstacles to getting an education at the H. J. C. is finding a place to park. "In the future," osseris "Bone- crusher" McKibben, "men will yearn for cigarettes just like mother used to make." Louise Morgan discovered that every year is leap year for the, pedestrian. A scientist says that the earth weighs more in the winter. Meyer Lurie thinks it's because everybody as on an overcoat. John L, McGaughey defines velocity ;, "What a person lets go of a bee with." Have you noticed them? What' Elmer Hamilton's stylish spats. Wilson Hunt declares he is not the least bit conceited. But the other day he bought a book entitled, "What Every Woman Wants," jus! to see if they spelled his name correctly. LeRoy Dailey should shave his cute little mustache before it saps all his strength. Our one and only Bob Branham: "If money talks, I'm speechless." Bernice Branum is so lazy that she only gets mad at mind readers, so she won't have to tell them what she thinks of 'em. O. D. Brown: "My father is working my way through college," James Page, an authority on sports, discovered the last man to box John L. Sullivan was his undertaker. George Snider: "When my wife gets to be 40, I'll trade her for two twenties." Jonah: "You can't keep a good man down." Allen Weed denies basket ball is his favorite game. Quail on toast is. Floyd Stough discovered his hair was full of electricity. It should be, its connected to a dry cell. Public speaking is the art of dilut- : a two-minute idea with a two- hour vocabulary."—Pat Inman. What would we do if we didn'> hnve 'Windy" Smith to keep the i'reshmen straight? S las Junior College displayed such an exhibition of beaus and bells as last Friday at the annual freshman prom. There was the freshman class president, Mac Douglas, of course the dance would not be complete without him. Winsome little Lula Grace Kellogg seemed to be corn- ting what we call the "grand rush." I axe you, didn't you think that "Hamp" Robinson was really the nerts in his "lax." I would be one to say that he was almost kissable. We wonder why Cy Shaw wasn't dancing more, it couldn't be that something has happened to that Den- tyne smile. Wilma Lindsay, closely followed by Silas Fry, enjoyed the dance down to the last note, though she said she enjoyed the intermission from twelve lo twelve-thirty the most. Say, boys, did you see Betty Covington? She was really the beller,—are we right or are we right? Well, everyone was happy and the floor was crowded with thousands of smiling students dancing to the intoxicating music furnished by Ted Clifford and his band. Oh! I almost forgot, according to the freshman class president the enormous sum of $1.25—no more, no less—was the net profit made on the dance. I was also requested to announce that this money will go to buy vaseline hair tonic for Mr. Birney (advertisement or something). Lamentations while tripping th fantastic . . . Marion Adams, God' ft to women . . . Elmer Hamilton' spats (or was it his winter underwear slipping down?) . . . Hulda Alexander an EYEFUL . . . Harvey Richards, H. J. C.'s own Beau Brummel . . . Charles Buse, who is always light on his partner's feet . . . radiant Violet Herbert who dances divinely . . . the girls fell for Murray Hart, one fell twice during one dance . . . Oscar Conroe, professionally a newspaper man and socially a gigolo . . . Pat Foley has his own idea of how to engage in the terpsichorean revels. And no H. J. C. dance is complete without Mr. Miner . . . A! K. Hall and Fuller Booze was present . . Nora Louise Calhoun sumptuously gowned . . . naughty stags Irving Weinstein and Billy Stovall . . . Howard Graham a treat for the ladies . . . alluring Gladys Kuykendall and handsome Warren Lemmon . . . Billy Wander suffered a Turkish bath in his tux . . . Donald McKibben, H. J. C. football star . . . Gladys Howard very pretty and red-headed, too . . . Frances Nesmith attracting plenty of stags. You should have seen . . . Margaret Smith, shrouded in valvet and strutting like a peacock . . . Donald Aitken, who deserves plenty of credit for making the dance a success . . . J. C. Crawford in a trance (and cold sober, too) . . . Windy Smith being mistook for a waiter. Impressive happenings . . . Tom Studdert and Rosemary Lawrence (the long and the short of it) . . . Messrs. Harris and Hooker, two boys that enjoyed themselves . . . enticing Bernice Branum . . . gallant Curtis Dunk . . . a ladies' man, H. D. Matthews . . Melbadel Wright, a suicide blonde (died by her own hands) . . . BUI Spitler with a foreign look in his eye . . . Rob't Raiford's complete disregard of his surroundings , . . Allyne Allen an eye-opener . . . Arthur Sweitzer with no regard for conscien- ciousness . . . symmetric Ruth Depperman . . . Alice Clare Luckel flashing a pair of seductive eyes ... the eciprocating motion displayed by C. G. Hall . . . Harold Renfro who dances like the average person can skate hile intoxicated . . . Richard Macfee, m't rush ladies . . . Fred Aebi was mistaken for Rudy Vallee and James Julian was mistaken for Frankenstein's monster. WHO KNOWS— Who the cute little girl wi',\ J. C. S. at the freshman dance was? Why Margaret Comhaire is always so happy? ^And 'why John Goodyear hangs around Junior College so much. If Hulda Alexander knows she looks like Joan Crawford when she wears her hair down? How M. Smith can be in so many ALUMNI NEWS Let's go back in the past a bit and see who we can see. Most 0f our favorites have left us but I guess they had to go somelime, though. Some here! Some there! Some everywhere! Seems as if Texas was their choice, for just oodles of ole H. J. C. studes are there now. F'r instance, GENEVIEVE WELDON, "the fairest of the fair," H. J. C.'s most popular girl, president of The Cougar Collegujns, yell leader, and well, she just held an office in every club she belonged to. And there's that inimitable LEE MEYER up at Texas, too. HAZEL TAYLOR, too, she also was president of the Pep Club, and best all around girl. Some olhers are CHARLES WARREN, FERNE SWEENEY, JOE TORTOR- ICE, TAM TAMBERELLO, MILDRED ALLBRIGHT, LLOYD REMBERT, FRANCIS HARRIS, CECILE IN- GOLD, SON FATJO, JIMMIE RAY PHILLIPS, WAYNE LIVERGOOD, GEORGE DORCHER, MARY SADLER, LONNIE LYONS, THELMA SCALES, PEARL FRIEDMAN, STERLING JACKSON,, and JACK THURMAN. Sterling was treasurer of the sophomore class and Jack was our scholarship winner last year. Let's move our opry glasses over to Chicago, huh? We see WILLARD NESMITH and HAROLD WOOD there just getting along fine and dandy. Willard won Ihe boys' debating contest in '29, was editor of The Cougar, too, president of the Dramatic Club, and a winner of the H. J. C. scholarship. Harold was our most popular boy and was president of last year's graduating class. Why not take a 111' peek up at Baylor? There's PHIL HAMBURGER. Phil's another asset that H. J. C. boasts. He was a member of our boys' debating team. Gordon Jones was his colleague. And I see LUCIEN BUKOWSKI. Gee, but we certainly miss his everlasting smile and wise cracks. Oh, yeh? Not to changing the subject, but I heard that FLOYD GALBREATH was goin' to A. and M. Isn't he the answer to a maiden's prayer? Gee! But was almost forgot Rice, and with ADELE DRINKLE out there, too. Adele was a member of the girls' debating., team last year. While I'm on the subject, I wonder where ELIZABETH SINCLAIR is this year; she was the other half of the team. And some say the better one. Oh, yes, Adele was our most biaut- ful girl in '29, and really and truly she was- beautiful. HAROLD STEELE seems to be farin' pretty well out there, don't you think? He was president of the Oratorical association last year, and did he make a good one ... are you telling me? REVERIS EAVES, HELEN ALLNOCH, and LOIS ROSE DAWSON are still out there, I hear. You know they say Lois Rose is Mr. Miner's one and only successor. Helen won the girls' tennis tournament out here last year, too. BERT FRIEDBERG is also giving Rice a treat. You know he came in on a close second to Bobbie Branum last year in the boys' tennis tournament. And there's MARY GEORGE HARRIS, JAY LEE NORMAN, AMOS BEELER, and WARREN BUTTLEMAN out there, too. All these girls that become nurses, what are we going to do to them? I took a slant over to Galveston just then, and who should I see but LLEWELLYN ROSS, one of the sweetest HI' co-eds we ever possessed. She's up at the John Sealy hospital, in training for a nurse. OPAL BEANE out at the Texas Dental college v. Otherwise she is known as the first president of the Cougar Colleg- We wonder where CLIFFORD WHITEHEAD, GUS MEYERS, BOBBIE MoCOLLOUGH, OLIVER Mc- CALL, AARON KALMANS, and SONNY STANACKER are Bet Howard Graham surely is missing Sonny as well as most of the rest of us. Give start on what you're doing, if anything, how you're getting along 'n' just everything that's writable. places at one time? Who John Smith is? And does he know Pocahontas? How A. Burns learned to read poetry so well? Why Murray Hart limped to school the Monday after the freshman dance? *
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