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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
File 005
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 005. May 25, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/164.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 25, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 005. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/164

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 005, May 25, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/164.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Contributor
  • Jones, A. Gordon
Date May 25, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 005
Transcript Prophecy of Classfof '32 OF THE rl. J. d. We enter the long, arched entry- Stewed, and in a few moments were met by that celebrated mystic, himself After a formal exchange of greetings, this slender Oriental seer led us into hi; private den and motioned us to seats. The room was small and richly furnished with many rare treasures from eastern lands. A single light was burning at one end and the air was heavy with the vapors of incense which burned before a jeweled figure of the great Buddha. We chatted for a few moments atid then made known the purpose of our visit. After listening in silence until we had finished speaking, Ali Time paused for a moment and then offered to let us look into'the depths of the magic crystal and see for ourselves what the future holds twenty years hence. We were seated before a small table with the lone light at our backs; upon the silken-cove red top of this table, Ali Time placed a beautiful, irridescent hell of purest crystal. After muttering various mystical incantations to the deities, he bade us to remain in absolute silence and to gaze fixedly into the depths of the crystal for a revelation of the facts we sought, jj After gazing steadily for five or ten minutes, our eyes filled with tears and then the ball grew misty. Then it turned black and after a moment seemed to disappear altogether; in its stead, we looked upon a moving panorama— we had been transported into the life of the year 1952. The Junior College of yester-year has now become the University of Houston, one of the finest universities in the world, with a broad and well-kept campus and many beautiful and stately buildings. Its faculty and equipment are matched by few and surpassed by none. Many of the graduates of H. J. C. now have sons and daughters in this magnificent institution. Among the many scenes that passed in review before our startled eyes we saw many familiar faces, those of our class-mates back in '32: Harold Bell Renfro, that ladies' man, could not be content with one woman so he left the United States to become the Sultan of Persia. He has been there for fifteen years, but is still looking for the second member of his harem; the first one married him for his money, but when she found out how really small the in- \ ducement was, she threatened to leave him s^jj £tope with the ice-man. Another popular figure from the campus of H. J. C, Christine Fitzgerald, gave up a promising career in the Follies (whose folly?) and returned to the Mighty Metropolis of Teague to become the sweetheart of the town and the mother of a family of five. lone Brown, after a gay and giddy youth, has finally settled down to become head librarian in the obscure city of New York. Many of the love-sick couples so often seen strolling through the corridors of dear old Alma Mater have ended their affairs at the altar; Johnny Heaner, after ten years of high pressure courtship, finally persuaded Beatrice Loock to say those sweet little words that sentenced him to a life of labor and now they'll soon have a freshman in the University of Houston. Edgar Nirken, Finklestein to you, has recently become the sole owner of a flourishing haberdashery establishment. The feature of Mr. Nirken's business in his big selling-out sale which lias been in progress for ten years. The stock is still intact. Mrs. Lavada Harris Wood has been very successful in her management of: *he Wildwood Retreat, a convalescent home. She has a very select clientele at present, composed chiefly of ovrworkd studnts of the snap courses taught by1 Mr. Miner and Mr. Miller. The rush has been so great that Mrs. Meta Bland, has recently joined the staff. •Among the ranks of those to achieve either . ffti&e oi" Hotoriei;' is Milford Smith. After blowing out of dear old Junior College ,he is still blowing, having become an internationally known lecturer Having been gifted with the power to improve on nature's handiwork, Bernice Blackshere has gained renown as a beauty expert. Her salon is the resort of the most noted beauties. Evelyn Harris has used her talents to beautify the world, also. She's. an interior decorator. (Not the kind you're thinking of either, smarty.) Even after twenty years there are some of us that would like to know Jo Carraway better. i We had such hopes for Louise Morgan's future, but we find her a leader in the back to the farm movement. Such is life. This concludes our vision except for the part concerning your reporters. But regardless of the requests of our tremendous and ardent public, due to —' our well-known inferiority complexes and overwhelming modesty, we will of the palatial home of Ali Time not unfold the last and by far the most important part. Signed: BOBBY BRANHAM, . __ GORDON JONES. Paul Sparks no longer says "I don't know," when a teacher asks him a question. (He sleeps through his classes and doesn't hear the questions now.) Vernon Smith no longer has to wear his red suspenders and green tie, but they sure did look cute. And Victor Voebel looking perfectly immaculate as usual. Seems to be a Reagan parade. The crowd's thinning now, and we gotta get to class before the next bell. HANNAH SHEARER Alice C. Luckel will attempt the lure of Hollywood and brightlights. She figures that her saucerlike eyes, steamboat build, and husky baritone voice. will eliminate all possible competition1 and put her on Broadway in record time. "Maybe I'll change my name to Maggie Squimp," she states. Ranch life in the ruff and tuff form must appeal to John Hill, who expects to spend his time riding horses and sleeping on a ranch in central Texas, where he will journey immediately. E. B. tells us of several wild parties that will take place on week ends and of many popular students who will stay there wrfh"him. Crab selling will take up all the time of Ruth Depperman and Grace Schoel- man. This popular pair will live a life at sea at Grace's home on the bay and will crab all day long and sell all night long for a living. We hope they do not starve but unless they are mighty good crabbers they are in for: some hard times. A lot of wild Ideas are centered in the head of Hamp Robinson who is undecided as to what he will do. "May- Cure for Carbon Monoxide Deadly carbon monoxide, a constituent of illuminating gas and automobile motor exhaust, takes a constant toll of life from the careless and unfortunate. Since it combines so avidly with human blood, the treatment of victims by ordinary methods of resus- itation is almost futile. Recently, however, a method for the euro of carbon monoxide poisoning was reported by L. Schmidt, of Kiel, Germany. By confining cats, rendered unconscious by carbon dioxide, in a chamber filled with pure oxygen in which the pressure oscillated between 2.3 and 2.5 atmospheres in synchronism with the breathing of the cats, the specimens were revived in two min- utes and were removed from the: chamber in full health with a half hour. I. J. C. LIBRARIAN MAKES ANNOUNCEMENT Mrs. Hannah Shearer, librarian wishes to announce that all library books taken out this week and next eek must be returned by May 27. After that books may be taken oul overnight until June 1. Students holding overdue books or owing library fines will not receive their grades or credits until they have cleared themselves with the library. An order for new library books to be used for reference work in sum- school has recently been made out. The Junior College Library has many books that are particuarly use- English students. Among these WALLACE H. MINER are the four reference books by which of the 'Old Windbag", as he is affectionately called by his few close friends j ^W«S "^ bo traced: (very few) is due to his sweet little wife, nee Miec nAo<n^n. t.gmwuv iwhnEo An inriov tr, T?'„r.trv and Socialism. Most of the success \ Miss Rosemary Lawrence, whose silken gfove shields an iron hand. Tom Studdert, the old gi^lo, has never in all these .years missed a .single dance, for he mixes business wii.li pleasure: be hs'the agent for a nationally advertised brand of corn plasters. 9 Florine Davis has become an expert on the care and feeding of goldfish and as such does a tremendous amount of business among the newly rich >vho manifest the utmost devotion to their finny pets. After a shaky start, Bernice Branum has now blossomed into an accomplished organist and has made the fans forget Ann Leaf and Jessie Crawford. Hugo Lueders staged a whirlwind political campaign and manged to get elected to Congress on quite an original platform, that of a "full dinner pail for the common man." No doubt, the entire credit for his election goes to his astute campaign manager, Vic Voebel, who says that you people al! of the time and the rest of them often By diligent application of the principles learned in Mr. Kerbow's psychology class, shy and retiring Elizabeth Bastian has built up a gigantic printing busi-;. ngss. Her motto is we print anything that's fit. (But who's to judge what's] Index to Pott1? and Rec£?tio»s. Dictionary of Phrases anu Fables. Familiar Quotations, by Bartlett. Hoyt's New Cyclopedia of Practical Quotations. As Index to Poetry -and Recitations has three indexes. A quotation or the verification of an author may be looked up in the title index, the author index, or the first line index. First, the exact source and author are given; then there are capital let- of the '*crs w*uc'1 represent publications containing these selections. The key to these letters or symbols found at the first or the book. Dictionary or Phrase and Fable fit?) I gives the "derivation, source, or origin Arthur "Killer" Burns, he of the magnificent torso, has become the idol of 0f common phrases, allusions, and the devotees of the squared circle and is a favored contender for the World's ! wort|s that have a tale to tell" All Dress Weight championship. _ ! words and expressioss are arranged Another to venture forth into the world of sports and make a name for himself is R. Louis "Strangler" Higginbotham, who by combining uncanny brain work with superhuman strength, now wears the belt of the World's Heavyweight Wrestling Cmampion. James Page and Jennie Jo Bentley, who used to delight the audiences in various school dramatic performances have continued their way up the tor- i road to stardom and are now rated as the two greatest lovers of the silver screen. Their superb portrayel of romantic roles far surpasses that of Garbo and Gable. i with deepest regret that we narrate the following sad events: Jim Bertrand, our own Jimmy, poor boy! was a famous r3*fio crooner, beloved of fifty million women, but when television became general his popularity suddenly faded. We wonder why. Elizabeth Dickinson and Justine Shapley still say that while a stocking might not hold all that they'd like for Christmas, a pair of socks would. O. D. Brown (the poor boy just didn't have a chance) has become a professor of economics and with the help of Nora Louise, has learned that two cannot live as cheaply as one. "Boys aren't the only ones to distinguish themselve in ports, Avis Cook and Rena Mai Butler, are now the two leading contenders for the women's tennis singles title, the crown once worn by Helen Wills Moody. "Slizabeth Ferguson, and Pauline Katribe, together with Catherine Meyers __• receiving the thrills of their lives acting as chaperons for modern youth. Each of them agrees that boys and girls haven't changed a bit since the time or our grandmothers. Two notable exponents of the dance, Elizabeth Kerbow and James McCar- dell, have become famous the world over and are one of the most sought after dancing teams on the stage. Frank Mills, the teachers' pet. is now called "cork" because he always has his head in the neck of a bottle. Anna Sloane has developed the terrible habit of talking in her sleep. It s,wms that she talks so much and so loud that she has to sleep in the next room to keep from waking herself up. Paul Gilder is still teaching the girls to swim. In a country that practices, homicide, its hard to understand how he has escaped some of these husbands. ,Eleanor Busbey and Violet Herbert, better known as Damon and Pythias, are still putting up with each other and have rented flats in the same apartment building. Hugo Englchardt has become an eminent biologist. He got his start skin- ling cats under the expert tutelage of Mr. Hooker. It is rumored that Cy Shaw, the Humble Oil' Roughneck, is about to leave the University of Houston, climaxing twenty years of labor lost. It is feared that the school will have to close its doors. What would it be without Cy? (We think it would be better off!) It took Addison Woestemeyer seventeen years to pop the question, but now after three years of wedded bliss, he and Myrta Ann Meisner are still sweethearts. What a record!!! Iphabetically. "Famous Quotations by Bartlett is a collection of passages, phrases, and proverbs traced to their sources in ancient and medievial literature. The material is first arranged; chronologically thru the nineteenth century; this is followed by a section' of miscellaneous excerpts, quotations. from classical writers, and excerpts' from the Bible and Book of Common Prayer. There is an author index at the first of the book, and another index at the back which is arranged alphabetically according to the principal word is the sentence. Hoyt's Cyclopedia is the quotation most easily used. The quotations are arranged under topics according to their general meaning, sense, or idea. This book contains' a Biographical Index, a Topical Index, and a Concordance at the end. be I'll get married," he laughs, "but who will marry me?" The butchering life at his dad's market will put money in his bank account but will offer little fun. He might live down at the bay or stay on a ranch but his mind is undecided. He probably will gigolo around. If Windy Smith improves his game j enough he plans to challenge Jake ! Hess for the Southwest Conference | tennis title. Months on the eouits should make his game look better and if it does, look out Jake Hess! A majority of the teachers will continue to instruct at the college. Because it is an age of depression and money is hard to get, it is felt that a little dinero will come in handy, and no doubt they are right. Even at that Mr. Miner could not leave his lovable history classes if he had to. And Mr. Birney feels that he may discover a future newspaper man in his ummer school class. SUMMER ACTIVITIES Camp Sterling wil claim the tutorship of two J. C. lads. Malcolm Pech and Adolph Marks, two prominent schoolboys will leave Houston soon after the finish of school and spend the entire summer at camp. Pech acts as instructor of athletics, while Marks coaches baseball and edits the camp paper. Cy Shaw will be shipped away by i the Humble Company and. will con- j tinue his roughneck oil field work in ; some other place. Aside from his work Shaw plans on spending several weeks the wilds where he will hunt and fish nil by his lonesome. REAGAN ALUMNI We were standing in the corridor a few minutes ago, and so many Hites people passed by, we thought for a while that we were back at Reagan. You shoulda seen 'em. There was Jim Bertrand, presdent of the Sophomore class; Christine Fitzgerald, president of the Dramatic Club, vice president of the Student Association, secretary of the Speaker's Club, and what-not. How could one person be so many things at one time? Ah! that sheik approaching— can it be, yes, no, well so it is, Sam Brickey with his hair as curley as ever. Howard Roberts and Henry Ra- denz, side-kicks of high school days. Wonder if they're still the pals they used to be. Wenor;!}h -Phd'pS, Secretary of the Platform Club, talking as usual, and still saying nothing. If it isn't Paul Gilder. Paul's going to be a gym teacher, but he's resting up at Junior College before beginnning his strenuous career. Jennie Dell Dawis decided to come out here and study dramatics. We'll bet it was so she could join the Silver Phantom Players. Wonder how she's making out. Me- thinks Virginia Cotter has another new hair cut. Looks cute, Virginia. Jessie Higganbotham, how'd you ever get out of high school? Oh well, so it's allright. And there's Berta Estes, still as pretty as ever, Margaret Smith couldn't stand the idea of being separated from Laverne Lathrop, so they both came to H. J. C. Leroy Melcher, owns his own car and what-not. Wonder if he's still going with a certain Hites brunette. Leonard Sherrod back in Houston this year. Into the old grind again. Lolita Washburn, petite and blonde, she sings in a church choir too. What a girl. FACTS AND FEATURES A skid-proof road of iron blocks on an asphalt base has been laid in London for exhibition purposes. India has no language common to all its people. The nectar which bees gather from ! flowers contains sucrose, the same sugar which is found in cane and in sugar beets. There is enough water on and in the Earth to cover the entire surface to a depth of three miles. The Sun is not the center of our Solar System! Astronomy has shown that the center swings toward the' planet Jupiter. Contrary to the usual idea, there is more caffein in tea than in coffee. Analysis shows that tea leaves contain 1.5 to 25 percent caffetin, while the coffee bean contains only 1%. Cocoa, if taken in sufficient quantities, may be classed as habit forming due to certain alkaloids present in the cocoa plant. A steel worker's air hammer strikes over sixteen blows per second. If all the gold in the world which 1 being used for money were to be melted together into one solid mass, it would make a cube thirty-one feet in every dimension. This would be worth $11,300,000,000. A snail has 8000 teeth! Camphor balls as sold on the market, are not made of camphor, but consist of naphthalene. According to statistics, 760 eggs are layed every second in the United States. America can fly 818 miles per hour It is about as big as a bumblebee. Due to atmospheric refraction, on a clear horizon the Sun can be seen before it rises, and after it sets! Sixty-eight people die on earth each minute according to statistical estimations. 50,000,000 Frenchmen can't be wrong. Oh yes they can. because the latest census shows that France has a population of less than 42 000 000
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