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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
File 004
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The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 004. May 25, 1932. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/163.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 25, 1932). The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 004. Daily Cougar. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/163

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932 - File 004, May 25, 1932, Daily Cougar, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/10270243/item/166/show/163.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Cougar, Vol. 5, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Alternative Title The Cougar, Vol. V, No. 13, May 25, 1932
Contributor
  • Jones, A. Gordon
Date May 25, 1932
Language English
Description From masthead: "The Cougar of The Houston Junior College, Houston, Texas. Established 1928."
Subject
  • College student newspapers and periodicals
  • University of Houston
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier LH1.H6 C6; OCLC: 10270243
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • University of Houston Archives
Rights In Copyright - Copyright Owner Unlocatable or Unidentifiable
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript This Season's Book-Worms By Zelda Osborne MURRAY A. MILLER IBHB^fMfr J9H1 ■iwtpiii1 ii zmmr shmbwb5 By ZELDA OSBORNE Allyne Allen, forgetting to feign illness during working hours, and altogether lacking that glassy stare she wore a certain Thursday, declares she could love "Scarface" (Paul Muni) even though he mangled grandmothers and choked babies. lone Brown, that "sweet, pure, and sensible" blonde whom we falsely judged when Mr. Dupre referred to "a little girl in the library" who was caught smoking, has gone home to Orange. Despite Mr. Miller's teaching, she writes that she prefers carnival hobby horses to American Government. "To be or not to be," that's what is worrying Marian Banta who is quite "Frank" about Ernest. Ernest's intentions are both honorable and noble, so we're told. For a while we were worred about Bernice Branum and a certain curly haired San Jacinto boy, but it seems that she has transferred her affections to a tall dark haired man. What a consolation!! A well-built somebody with a low, deep, drawl, that Hulon Crawford, whose brotherly affection we just couldn't do without. t Our little brunette, Jeanette Will- man, is rating a rush from that nice be-mustached young man who up until now has been interested only in horses and blondes. Ora Louise Morgan is our idea of a nice girl and a lady (though a co-ed) .1 She is a genuine blonde, has a "steady" iola, (Haitai), who were seen by Co- —just her type, and is an all-round lumbus amusing themselves with rub- girl in all ways. ber balls. The French synonym for Here's our contribution to Ripley: ' the term "India-rubber" is caoutchouc. Isabella Ventresca, who knows Span- Cao, measing wood and o-chu, to run ish, French, and Mr. Miner, is a col- or weep, obviously refers to a tree lege sophomore and uses neither rouge showing some abnormal form of exu- nor lipstick. dation. Lewis Rueckert, with that nice, nice Chemically, rubber is a hydrocarbon voice, has been offered an unexpurgated having the approximate formula (CIO copy of Balzac's Droll Stories for $1.98 | H16) and is extremely resistant. It Is plus postage. Maybe he'll rent it to us not the product of a single species of ioJ to draw naughty* trees, but is obtained commercially I costam other higher boiling alcohols. But the bootleggers haven't time for I that. In Louisiana they think that leather ages whiskey, so shoes, mule collars, etc., are often found in the vats. j Electric agers are more up to date. " | Prune juice, iodine, or cavomal color- , mg helps to carry out the illusion. The alcoholic content of most moos- 1 shine is form 25 to 50 per cent, while beer is from 3 to 7 per cent. Still, beer is the more injurious, for , whiskey is at least distilled. Recently 1 there has been reports of limber neck , and beer faces swollen like a case of mumphs from west Texas. Innocent looking yeast cakes that have gone bad causes the above effects. People who make beer do not have the correct information or equipment to make beer so that it is not injurious. Many of them are unable to understasd why one cannot spike near | beer when it is really about as simple as breaking an egg and putting it back in the shell. It can be done but that is one of Uncle Sam's laboratory secrets. There are numerous other little details that when found out will maybe make you think before you continue your drinking habit, ^rg Emotional Tempewmonts BY H. TRISTRAM ENGLEHARDT Rubber By Sylvia Wilkenfeld It is interesting to note that a crude form of the material, rubber, which we use so extensively today, was employed by the inhabitants of Hispan- 55 ! pictures on the margins. This arid That SCD3NCE NEWS LETTER from the stems of trees, from climbers, from the roots, and from the stems and leaves of a dozes different plants which thrive in tropical climates only, but under widely varying conditions. Rubber also occurs in the solid state as a deposit in the woody fiber of the shrub Parthenium Argen- Mexico asd Texas, from Either consciously or unconsciously men and women tend to select mates tatum whose intelligence is about on their which the guayule rubber of own level, says a psychologist of the is derived. There seems t University of California. danger of exhausting the world' Men have been making glass for 5,- 000 years, but it is only in the last 25 years that machinery has been adapted to this ancient craft. Nutrition experts say that sweets made from molasses are rich in iron and calcium. In ancient Egypt, the title "White House" was bestowed not upon the residence of the ruler but upon the treasury. Helium 99.96% pure has been produced in a government laboratory here in Texas, an important advancement, since increased purity in helium gives increased lifting power to air- be no ply, so abundant and widely scattered are its sources; in addition chemists for years have been working on synthetic rubber to take the place of the sa' ural products. Crude rubber is obtained from the milky juice of the rubber tree. This is not the true sap but a secretion which is evidently of no necessity to the life of the plant. In this juice float the globules of rubber which rise to the top like cream. The globules are then submitted to various refining methods which purify and change the rubber to the form for which it is to be used. HUMOR Scientists insist the sun is going to last us another 15,000,000,000 years. What, then, is the idea of all this day light saving..—New York Evening Post. Biology Professor: "Didn't you study this last chapter on the nervous sys- Student: "Sir, I read a page and then it said that the brain should never be forced to work when already tired, and so I followed the rule.' First: "I hear your old man died of hard drink." Second: "Yes, poor fellow, a < ice fell on his head." Foreman: "The load is too heavy for the size fuses you are using." Bonehead Electrician: "But I don't see why the load should be heavy enough to blow the fuses. The blueprint says this is a light circuit." Second Cook: "Did you expect me to scrape those fish you have just dis- embowled?" First Cook: "Sure, they are drawn to scale." An eminent statistician that there are now more chemists this country than there are of any other kind of scientists; we told you prohibition was bringing results.— Ohio State Journal. It probably wasn't until the explorers came that the hyena had anything to laugh at. Left To Its Fate: "I went to the dentist yesterday." "Does the tooth still ache' ft k) Alcoholic Poisoning One reason for the rats usefulness in scientific experiments is that a week in a rats life is about equal to a year in the life cycle of a human being. A new gaseous motor fuel, which wrives a truck and refrigerates it as well, has been developed for commercial cars. On passenger liners now being built, the weather—indoors at least—will be kept regularly "fine" by means of air- conditioning apparatus. Before coffee became the beverage it Is today, the berries were first used as food and later medicine. A German firm making photographic _ __ accessories has produced a filmpack aftereffects "(unless repea'ted too" regu with a locking device, which makes, iariy \ double exposures impossible. Tho newest water-tight "I don't I ; he kept it." Alcohol in any form has a decided effect on people. It may be observed , in the Freshman Chemistry class at | Houston Junior College that even the j discusson of alcohol, its purposes and uses, immediately stimulates even thee: most dormant members of the class- I It is well to mention here the difference in the effect on the body between grain alcohol and wood alcohol. | Grain alcohol or ethyl alcohol is dized to give carbon-dioxide water; this may not have any Professor: "Smith, what is the com- positis of water?" Smith: "Water is composed of two gins; oxygin and hydrogin. Oxygin .: pure gin; hydrogen is gin and water Mr. Bishkin: "Miss Wilkenfeld, what can you tell me about nitrates?" Sylvia Wilkesfeld: (Ex - telephone girl) "Night-rates are less than day- "Ugh! Ugh! B. O." muttered the Indian as the skunk passed by. SCANDAL SHEET Everything's gone screwy this week. First the boys turn pansy-like and start wearing swimming suits in tht- school pool. Then because of final exams, the sophs will not teach classes till later. Finally because nobody falls in love, acts the fool or commits any sins. Portia Garrot gave a nifty party over the week end which featured a treasure hunt. Something was stale in Lithuania cause "Gab-a-lot" found the That "hang dog" expression has been taken off the face of Ed Boyle who was thought to have fallen in love with Bernice B., but Ed gives them all the run-around and likes to "string 'em along." Mosquitos busted up all moon views down at the bay and fickle romance took time out while the couples laid off shooting the bull and spent their time at bug slaughter. Horseback riding the Pi Betas will go this Thursday midnight. Requirements are that every male must bring a femme. We ask, "What knd of party is this going to be?" Quite a few journeyed down to the Richmond Rat affair at the University Club. Ruth Depperman's charms appealed to one lad so much that in his weaker moments he threatened to whip everyone that danced with her and while dancing with her offered everything he had if she would consent to be his spouse. At first it was thought to be ballyhoo but Florins D. really did lure Mr. Miner to the end of the Sylvan pier while his wife vainly called for her A sewerlike drink: Mix sauerkraut juice, honey, buttermilk and milk of magnesia. Boil to 500 d. f. and place in incubator. Providing it will not go blooey take a swallow and get the sur- of your life. (Thankx to butlegger Vernon Smith.) Quotes the poetically inclined man (Ed B.) on his honeymoon while strolling along the beach with his bride (Bernice B.) "Roll on thou deep and dark blue ocean, roll." .... "Oh Eddie," cried the bride, "you're so wonderful! It's doing it." Schopenhauer says that life is just a great mistake, and he proves it. The great philosopher was undoubtedly a temperamental man, and we find that people of emotional temperament are very seldom in good health—the reason for this is biologic in its nature. Emotions represent increased activity of the electric motor mechanism of that machine which is composed of organic cells in the form of a man- when we are very much excited, there is immediately an increase of energy giving substances in the brain cells. The digestive function and functions of nutrition are for the time being almost at a standstill because every bit of energy has been concentrated on that particular emotion. Anyone who allows himself the excitement of a strong emotion of any kind, is doing so at the expense of concentrating his whole physiology upon a special ef- During this time when he is so unstrung, a great many waste products accumulate — these can only be removed through exercise. The liver is kept very busy as it must dispose of acid by-products. Emotional people do not, as a rule, take enough exercise for the simple reason that they become weak through their emotions. It would be a good idea if people could resort to balanced rations of emotions and exercise, very much like our balanced rations of food upon a diet chart: Angry from 2 to 2:45 p.m., brisk walk from 2:45 to 3:30 p.m., et! cetra. Perhaps we would exercise more control over our emotions, be it grief, worry or envy, if we realized that our whole physiology must stand the consequesces. Not only are the nerves over-wrought, but are actual change taken place in all of those organs of the body in which cells are working overtime during the emotion. When these organs do not have time to recuperate, thus very frequently the cell organization is so disturbed that various diseases of the heart lungs, kidneys and other vital organs' . The will can control the emotions but freedom of the will is limited through the influence of microbic toxins. — I -i-L PEARL BENDER ..itBi Mule in the barnyard, lazy and sick, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Boy with a pin in the end of a stick,: The Englishman who said Americans Boy jabbed mule, mule gave a lurch— . have no imagination ought to meet thej Services Monday in the Baptist Church.^ guy who named near beer. J. H. LE Hlow* , [in Wood alcohol, however, has quite different effects within the body, since controlled electrically' it fonm" ^^ ^ ^^ ', and ran hp rlnenri .... | I from the bridge and can be closed throughout the ship in half a minute. In the days of the Roman Empire there were surgeons who specialized n operating on the eye for cataract. As early as the fourteenth century there were street vendors in Europe a sold crude spectacles, both for adornment and as an aid for vision. The word "tuxedo" traces its origin :to the name of an Algonquin _ Indian I subtribe: a town was named for thei 1 tribe, and the dinner jacket got its1 name from the town. The half moon is only one-ninth as : bright as tbe full moon.^^-' . Museum of Crjrfle has been opened in Rome. *^ There are craters on the moon 100 Soviet Russia is planning to establish new weather stations in the Polar region. The United States consumes less :han one-halt its great cotton crop. The tip of the hour hand of a mans I watch travels about eight inches a to us's ■ of dia blindness, insanity or even death, as ' it has done in numberless cases. Youi can read in the newspapers almost| every day where some one has been* the victim of bootleg whiskey. Another cause of posoning is in whiskey that has not been properly aged. The ageing process removes the aldehydes or "fusil oils." In the ageyig process the first change is the form »- tion of acids by the aldehydes. The acids then combine with other substances in the alcohol forming esters, which dissolved in the whiskey give it its characteristic flavour. Without this process the liquor is probably poison. Safer not to take a chance; you may not be lucky. "We all want yo' to pahty tonight, Mandy." "Can't Sam. Ah got ; "Aw come along anyway and bring it wid yo. These folks'U drink most anything." —\ A. L. KERBOW He coddled Violet in his arms. Bob drove her Ford—poor silly, And where he once held Violet, He now holds a lily. —E. B. Hill. If Ethyl gas seen all kinds of sparking, what has kerosene? Sarah Donaldson: You're the sweetest boy I've ever kissed. E. M. Flake: Aw! Tell that to the II Sarah: I have—dozens of them. Some girls won't go out with bank clerks because so many are tellers. James Julian: Who is your fa\ author? Adolph Marks: My dad. J. J.: Baloney, what did he A. M.: Checks. We all laugh at teacher's jokes No matter what they be. Not because they're funny jokes But because it's policy. Mistress: Nora, you were entertain- ig a man in the kitchen last night. rere you not? Nora: That's for him
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